Jack of Fables Vol. 3: The Bad Prince and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 12.26
  • List Price: CDN$ 16.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 4.73 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Jack of Fables Vol. 3: Th... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Jack of Fables Vol. 3: The Bad Prince Paperback – Jul 8 2008


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 12.26
CDN$ 6.52 CDN$ 4.23

2014 Books Gift Guide
Thug Kitchen, adapted from the wildly popular web site beloved by Gwyneth Paltrow ("This might be my favorite thing ever"), is featured in our 2014 Books Gift Guide. More gift ideas

Frequently Bought Together

Jack of Fables Vol. 3: The Bad Prince + Jack of Fables Vol. 2: Jack of Hearts + Jack of Fables Vol. 4: Americana
Price For All Three: CDN$ 39.68


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo (July 8 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401218547
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401218546
  • Product Dimensions: 16.8 x 0.8 x 25.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #186,409 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

By Sverre Svendsen TOP 500 REVIEWER on Sept. 3 2010
Format: Paperback
This time Jack and his sidekick Gary, the Pathetic Fallacy, have left Las Vegas and are headed for Nevada and Arizona. They get intercepted by Pris Page, in the service of Mr Revise and his Bagmen who are out to trap and rid the world of all Fables. Jack meets his erstwhile "twin" Wicked John whom he hates because he is so much like him. They have an accident and fall down into the Grand Canyon where they encounter an ancient oracle who pierces Jack with the sword Excalibur. As an adjunct we are introduced to Kevin Thorne, a Literal (those who under spells compose myths and fairytales), to Young John who apparently was the first to climb the beanstalk grown from the magic beans, and to a normal-sized Paul Bunyan and his pet, the miniaturized sagacious bull, Babe, who ruminates on the puzzles of life's incidental and noteworthy occurrences.

There are conflicts galore and Jack is at his best describing his past heroic'but often less than honourable adventures. A bonus at the end is about Jack as Jack o'Lantern in which he bargains with Old Scratch, a red-suited host of the nether regions, and lives to regret it as he has to outwit numerous legendary and devious pretenders to the hellish realms.

This is a treat for fans of illustrated serialized art that are appreciative of the wry humour. Here we have some of Bill Willinham's best efforts in this genre: contemporary fairytales for adults.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Nicola Mansfield HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Aug. 4 2010
Format: Paperback
Reason for Reading: next in the series.

This entire volume except for the last chapter is devoted to the title story arc "The Bad Prince". Jack has a run in with Excalibur and learns a shocking truth about his existence. All the regulars are here and it was great to see the return of Paul Bunyan and Babe from Vol. 1, though they've been shrunk down in size as punishment for their part in the Great Escape. A new character is introduced and an old character from Fabletown shows up. This is a minor character who pops up now and then, though he has caused trouble in Fabletown, and in this volume we learn his true identity, which is a bit of a shocker and questions are answered in this series "and" ones that have been posed in "Fables" are also being answered.

I really enjoyed this volume. The story arc is a lot of fun. Jack is not able to take advantage of anyone this time around as he is the one getting the short end of the stick through out. But in a twist of events, this time, he's the one who wins in the end. A bit of a turn around on Jack's usual plights. The volume ends with a single Hallowe'en issue where Jack reminisces about the past and tells the story of how he came back from the dead, bargained with the devil and got the name Jack o'Lantern. A fun story. Loved this volume and am on my way to place an order for Vol. 4.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Booky McGee on Feb. 26 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Just the fable of Jack and Ol' Scratch alone is worth the cost on this one. Best of the series to be sure!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 14 reviews
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
A brilliant continuation of the Fables' Universe July 27 2008
By Robert Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Even though Jack is perhaps my least favorite Fable in the wonderful imaginative universe that Bill Willingham has created, I once again have been completely blown away by one of his collections. This addition to the sequence features some truly wonderful twists. There are also a number of additions to the overall Jack narrative that significantly increases the complexity of the tale.

The big surprise is that the revelation that Jack is the not the original of the Jack/John stories, but the copy. If you've read any studies dealing with European folktales, you have undoubtedly encountered the idea of Jack stories (very similar in Native American folklore concerning Coyote stories). There are a host of stories centered on this character, more of a type than a specific individual. Here the idea is introduced that through the Powers that Be, Jack was a copy of John, insted of the other way around. The stories were actually about John, whose memories Jack has been provided.

The real meat of the story, however, lies elsewhere, as we learn a great deal more about Mr. Revise and hints about the particular kind of being that he is, as well as the revelation that there are others like him. I am not buying the individual issues of this series as they come out so I have not checked to verify this, but I suspect that the next group of issues focus on this. Suffice it to say that this book is crucial in introducing essential plot twists to come.

The book also ties in rather nicely with Volume 10 of the FABLES story, in a couple of ways. First, this volume is entitled JACK OF THE FABLES 3: THE BAD PRINCE, while the other is FABLES 10: THE GOOD PRINCE. Second, in the Jack volume a sword is rammed through his chest by someone who appears to be Merlin. In the FABLES volume we learn that the sword may have resulted from more than just that.

All in all, another great addition to one of the best ongoing comics series around. If you love comics, you should definitely add this to your collection, but only after you've added the previous FABLES and JACK releases.
Another fun romp with the amoral Jack Horner/Jack O Lantern/Jack Be Nimble... Dec 9 2008
By Mir - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I always say to myself, "Nah, I'm done with Jack." But another paperback comes out gathering the comics issues, and again, I am drawn to the rascal.

It's hard to describe how likably unlikable he is. I mean, he's selfish, vain, greedy, thoughtless, ill-tempered, yes, but he's also clever, energetic, funny, and outrageous.

In this adventure (we've seen him as a Hollywood mogul, in a concentration camp of sorts for Fables, in Las Vegas with Lady Luck), he's on the road...again. As an escapee from Golden Boughs (where storybook characters go to be forgotten, against their will), he's got a sidekick in the Pathetic Fallacy (this development cheers my English Lit degree heart to no end), who has memory issues. Mr. Revise is making sure the forgetting continues, and that includes erasing the memories of escapees so they forget Golden Boughs.

He and P.F. are captured by the Page sisters, but things go, as they will around Jack, quite wrong.

There are a couple of fabulous plot twists--the one with Excalibur and the one with Wicked John, and be careful of one of the following reviews which has serious spoilers, in case you care about surprises that way--and there is a nice bit of humor.

There is also an inclusion of a flashback tale that's intended as a Halloween season treat. Devilish goings on are both funny and dark. Just right for the holiday.

The whole Fables franchise is a delight. I've read all the ones available in bound-paperback form. And I still await the next adventures of the Fables folks, including wascally wicked Jack.

Just plain fun, and with good dialogue to boot(unlike soem of the comics I read this week.)

Mir
Really good, but not as good as the previous volume. Jack of Fables continues to be a Spin Off worth reading. July 8 2010
By Enrique Treviño and Yuliia Glushchenko - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This volume has two stories. The first one consists of four issues and it is hard to describe. It does a lot in terms of giving the series more depth. It gives us more background on Revise, it shows us a lot of Jack's past by having him cross paths with Wicked John (a very similar guy to Jack in personality and in looks, the only difference seems to be the color of their hair). It introduces the notion of "Literals" which will have repercussions later and it gives a big spotlight on Gary, the pathethic fallacy. Even though this story seemed to not be very plot driven, I think it was very good, mainly because it has a ton of humor. Almost every page has a funny scene in it. In the volume, there are three pages that focus on Paul Bunyan's pet, and this pet is hilarious. Each one of those pages consists of the pet having delusions, such as being the inventor of graham crackers or a kind pirate.

The second story is one issue long. Another fairy tale kind of story. Doesn't have a huge impact on the overall story arc, but it is a nice short story involving Jack. This time it is about his time as Jack O'Lantern. Jack makes a deal with the devil and ends up being in our world without being alive. It is hilarious to see how reckless Jack is. This story is much weaker than the Jack Frost story in my opinion, but it is still worth telling. I really like the side stories that Willinghma gives us. It's been a great joy reading stories from his FABLES universe.
Fun Volume, Best So Far for Jack, imho Aug. 4 2010
By Nicola Mansfield - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Reason for Reading: next in the series.

This entire volume except for the last chapter is devoted to the title story arc "The Bad Prince". Jack has a run in with Excalibur and learns a shocking truth about his existence. All the regulars are here and it was great to see the return of Paul Bunyan and Babe from Vol. 1, though they've been shrunk down in size as punishment for their part in the Great Escape. A new character is introduced and an old character from Fabletown shows up. This is a minor character who pops up now and then, though he has caused trouble in Fabletown, and in this volume we learn his true identity, which is a bit of a shocker and questions are answered in this series "and" ones that have been posed in "Fables" are also being answered.

I really enjoyed this volume. The story arc is a lot of fun. Jack is not able to take advantage of anyone this time around as he is the one getting the short end of the stick through out. But in a twist of events, this time, he's the one who wins in the end. A bit of a turn around on Jack's usual plights. The volume ends with a single Hallowe'en issue where Jack reminisces about the past and tells the story of how he came back from the dead, bargained with the devil and got the name Jack o'Lantern. A fun story. Loved this volume and am on my way to place an order for Vol. 4.
Jack Doesn't Do Jack in Vol. 3... But Still Entertaining Jan. 27 2010
By Paige Turner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
For Fables fans that can't get enough, Bill Willingham hits us right between the eyes with "Jack of Fables!" Jack Horner is a bold Fable that is an outcast from Fabletown. Mr. Revise, who has a plot to make fables disappear by erasing their stories, captures him. This volume details his capture and escape, with the customary flashbacks, which are twisted versions of old fairy tales involving Jack.

Despite being the fact that this set of Jack of Fables is almost devoid of plot, full of exposition and back-story, Willingham still delivers. Jack may already be my favorite character of all the fables. He is a handsome cad, egotistical, and boorish. And he constantly tries to score with the girls - so he's basically a teenage male in an imaginary immortal body.

The art is lively and cool, drawn this time by Tony Akins and Andew Pepoy instead of Willingham's usual collaborators. I guess Willingham creates too much cool material for any one artist to keep up with.

The lack of a plot in this compilation made me pine for the full Fables for the first time during the "Jack" series. The mobius loop of the storyverse makes it all worthwhile. I can't wait to read the next volume; let's hope its not another case in which Jack doesn't do jack.


Feedback