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Java Swing Paperback – Nov 30 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 1280 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 2 edition (Nov. 30 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596004087
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596004088
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 5.1 x 23.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (68 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #340,140 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From Amazon

Java Swing is an excellent introduction to the latest developments in Java-interface technology. The authors explain how (and why) to use Swing components, and meanwhile proceed to document the entire Swing API with the thoroughness and accuracy programmers have come to expect from O'Reilly & Associates.

Eckstein, Loy, and Wood start with an architectural overview of Swing and its relationship to the Abstract Window Toolkit (AWT) and the rest of Java. They talk a little bit about converting programs from the old AWT to the Swing-enhanced AWT, and explain how Swing manages components' "look and feel" characteristics. There's also coverage of actions, which are among Swing's handiest new features.

From that point, they proceed to guide readers through the Swing forest, pointing out all the important stuff along the way. Mostly, this tour takes the form of graphical user interface (GUI) component documentation, with chapters devoted to buttons, lists, tables, panes, and the other thingamajigs you can put on-screen with Swing. All the classes in each category get entries, many of which include good commentary and some examples. The authors give some attention to the Accessibility API and its associated utilities, too.

A detailed chapter that walks the reader through the process of creating a custom look and feel distinguishes Java Swing from its competitors--this potentially confusing process is explained clearly and thoroughly. --David Wall --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

The Swing classes eliminate Java's biggest weakness: its relatively primitive user interface toolkit. Java Swing helps you to take full advantage of the Swing classes, providing detailed descriptions of every class and interface in the key Swing packages. It shows you how to use all of the new components, allowing you to build state-of-the-art user interfaces and giving you the context you need to understand what you're doing. It's more than documentation; Java Swing helps you develop code quickly and effectively. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joe Chong on May 21 2004
Format: Paperback
The book as a whole is pleasant to read and covers wide enough range of topic. One huge glaring omission is the GridBagLayout (only mentions in passing while cover other less pwerful layout managers). What's up with that?
Don't hope to get much on the section on creating a custom editor kit. The book makes no mention about how to actually create alternative document structures. The on-line chapter is no help on this matter either. I wish the book will explain how ElementSpec class is used.
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By A Customer on April 28 2003
Format: Paperback
The Swing classes eliminate Java's biggest weakness: its relatively primitive user interface
toolkit. Swing provides many new components and containers that allow you to build sophisticated
user interfaces, far beyond what was possible with AWT. The old components have been greatly
improved, and there are many new components, like trees, tables, and even text editors. It also
adds several completely new features to Java's user interface capabilities: drag-and-drop, undo,
and the ability to develop your own "look and feel," or the ability to choose between several
standard looks. Written for the experienced Java developer, Java Swing provides an in-depth guide to
getting the most out of Sun's Swing/JFC user interface classes. Mixing
real-world code examples and expert advice on advanced features, this book shows how to make use of this powerful
library effectively within your own projects.
As a general Swing reference, this book is very good; where it excels is at covering the numerous
important aspects of Swing theory and application. I was initially disappointed by the lack
of coverage of layout managers, however the rest of the content has been extremely useful
in helping me understand the key aspects of Swing GUI development.
Java Swing gives you in-depth coverage of everything you need to know to take full advantage of Swing,
providing detailed descriptions of every class and interface in the key Swing packages. It shows you how
to use all of the new components. Whether you're a serious Java Swing Developer or just trying to figure
out what Java can do you will find this book as an indispensable guide.
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By Jason on April 26 2003
Format: Paperback
"Java Swing" is an in-depth look at the features and components of Java's popular Swing API. The much-anticipated second edition of O'Reilly's classic brings the book up-to-date with the changes made in SDKs 1.3 and 1.4. Each Swing component is covered in detail, providing information on constructors, methods, and properties. There is of course a plethora of example code clearly demonstrating how to use the various components and features.
While "Java Swing" is quite a hefty book, it does not cover the Java event model introduced in JDK 1.1, the AWT layout managers, or relevant AWT components such as Component that are subclassed by Swing components. Instead references are given to pdf files containing chapters of O'Reilly's out-of-print AWT book. While this may have been an acceptable omission for the first edition in 1998, where it might be assumed that developers had some experience with AWT, I do not feel this is a valid assumption today.
If you can look past the book's omissions, or if you have a companion reference covering those features, "Java Swing" has much to offer and will serve as a treasured reference. If you are unfamiliar with AWT and looking to learn how to develop user interfaces in Java, you may wish to look elsewhere first.
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By David Cunningham on April 16 2003
Format: Paperback
Java Swing is the definitive reference for the Graphical User Interface (GUI) Swing package that has been included in the standard distribution of the Java SDK since Java 1.2. The book is really more of a tomb, weighing in at 1200 pages, and yet none of it seems irrelevant or overly explained. If anything, one would have to complain that maybe there are details missing, but given the length of the book as is, maybe it's better that some of the details were left out.
Publishers O'Reilly have obviously assembled a group of talented Java GUI designers to write this book, because the commentary is rife with real advice and coherent, practical explanations. The book does take some assumed knowledge for granted, such as basic programming skills, knowledge of Object-Oriented programming practices, and UML-style class and object relationship graphs, but I wouldn't say that this book excludes the beginner programmer in the least. Instead, it walks the fine line of being a useful book for both beginner and expert coders quite well, better than other O'Reilly publications that I've read in the past that I felt were overly explanatory.
The book starts off with a little history on the Swing package, where it came from and what its relationship to the Abstract Windowing Toolkit (AWT) is, but then almost immediately launches into the format that it uses for the next 900 pages of the book, which is to devote an entire chapter to every major section of swing. Topics covered include: buttons, scrollbar-like components, combo-boxes, containers of every shape and size, dialogs, borders, menus, tables, trees, undo facilities, text (about 220 pages on the major text components alone,) and drag and drop.
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