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JavaScript for the World Wide Web: Visual Quickstart Guide [Paperback]

Tom Negrino , Dori Smith
3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (139 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 23.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Book Description

Nov. 28 2005 Visual QuickStart Guides
This book follows up on the enormous success of HTML for the World Wide Web: Visual QuickStart Guide. This revamped edition provides an easy bridge for those who used the HTML Visual QuickStart Guide to conquer HTML and are now ready to tackle JavaScript.While other JavaScript books target experienced programmers, this fully revised second edition is aimed at the large group of less technical Web authors who know HTML but know nothing about programming. With JavaScript, even Web page creators without a programming bone in their body can call up pre-cooked Java animations, add clocks to their Web pages, enable their pages to ask questions and gather information from visitors, and more.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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From Amazon

JavaScript is great, but at best it is a complementary language for Web development. JavaScript for the World Wide Web offers a productive, how-to style that lets you solve a problem or pick up a trick and then move on with the rest of your work.

Consistent with other members of Peachpit's Visual QuickStart Guide series, this title makes wise use of side-by-side explanations and screen shots, as well as code snippets and their analysis. This approach gives readers the feeling that the authors are sitting by their side and showing them how to code scripts. Most subjects are handled with numbered steps, such as "Validating Zip Codes", and useful tips punctuate the text.

The book introduces the whole concept of JavaScript in a fast-moving but readable chapter and then moves into solving real-world challenges. The authors do a good job of covering JavaScript's capabilities, from eye-catching graphics tricks to data-entry form processing and cookie management. Particularly enjoyable is the way the book spells out many of the differences between Netscape and Microsoft dynamic HTML approaches.

The JavaScript object model is laid out in an appendix, along with object compatibility between various browser flavours. To complement the book, the publisher offers a Web site that makes all of the example code easily downloadable for your use. This is a great little guide for both busy coders and JavaScript novices. --Stephen W. Plain --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From Library Journal

Peachpit's "Visual Quickstart Guides" is an excellent series focusing on highly visual software for both Macintosh and Windows. Uses for the software range from 3-D modeling with Ray Dream, to paper-page layout with QuarkXpress, to web design with GoLive and NetObjects. The approach is excellent for both self-learning and classroom work. The editors match great illustrations with total concentration on accomplishing very specific tasks and a minimum of extraneous discussion. My students love this series because the books are much less long-winded than I am.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars SCRIPTS DON'T WORK May 10 2004
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
It seems to me that most of these scripts don't work. I'm in IT and also a web site administrator, and I still can't get them to work as they are written. I give the authors a 3 for being motivated enough to write the book, though. It seems that they have good intentions.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great introduction Jan. 17 2004
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I maintain content for a corporate extranet. I have often implemented JavaScript scripts and made some modifications. However, I had never really understood how the scripts worked. I got this book and "Beginning JavaScript" by Paul Wilton, so I could learn the nuts and bolts. After reading this I started to actually understand the scripts I was implementing. I recommend that beginners start by reading the Visual Quickstart (VQ) book and then move onto something more indepth like Wilton's book. VQ is an excellent concise introduction to the basics of JavaScript. It gives a quick explanation of things such as event handlers, methods, properties, functions and loops. You should be able to finish this book in a couple of weeks and have a solid understanding of the basics of JavaScript. However, you will then need something more indepth to truly learn to program complex JavaScripts.
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By Bobster
Format:Paperback
I have two other Javascript books and have used on-line resources from time to time. I found this fifth edition to be a worthy addition. It isn't intended to be the ultimate comprehensive book, nor does it target the advanced scripter who wants the latest in tips and tricks. As it says in the introduction, the authors "concentrate on showing you how to get useful tasks done with JavaScript without a lot of extraneous information." The "Where to Learn More" section directs you to an excellent sampling of on-line resources that more than adequately addresses what you might find lacking in this book.
There are lots of practical examples and there is a companion site on-line where you can check out the examples and access the code for copy and pasting.
Since there are so many different ways to do things with JavaScript, you may or may not like the choices the authors make in the examples but you can't go far wrong imitating their style.
The language is clear and easy for me to understand, which really helps.
Javascript can be really frustrating compared to some other languages because there is zero tolerance for error and the error messages generated are of such little help in identifying the problem. The tips this book offers on debugging are worth way more than the price of the book!
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By cbcbcb
Format:Paperback
I have to agree with Robert from Philly above -- this book is good for copying code that you need for your site but NOT for teaching you how to use JavaScript, despite the fact that the front cover claims that you can "teach yourself JavaScript the quick and easy way!... You'll be up and running in no time!" Well, you cannot teach yourself JavaScript with any depth of understanding with this book and the only way you can be "up and running" is by copying their code into your HTML document. Right at the beginning of the text there is a brief section (5 pages) describing what objects, properties, methods, event handlers, and variables/values are, but then the text jumps right into complex code for specific functions with general explanations of the details and barely any explanation of the syntax, as if the authors just EXPECT that you will want to copy the code for your own personal use instead of understand it. I was very, very disappointed in this book that was recommended to me by a JavaScript teacher.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Blast From the Past Sept. 11 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
JavaScript for the World Wide Web does not offer anything extraordinary in regards to the JavaScript (ECMAScript) language. This book focuses on simple web tricks that are simply out of season for modern web design and programming. There is hardly, if at all, coverage of programming with modern browsers like IE6, Opera 7, and Mozilla and with web standards from W3C, nor is there mention of non-web programming usages of JavaScript (ECMAScript) like for .NET, Acrobat, Flash.
So if you want to do little web tricks that was popular with Netscape 3 and Netscape 4 from almost a decade ago (frames, forms, images, etc.), then this book is for you. If you want to program for modern applications including modern web browsers, then you'll have to look elsewhere as this book is a waste of time, even it was for free.
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Format:Paperback
Most books on JavaScript are packed with examples of how to do several simple tasks. Kinda like a cookbook; you can make several different individual items, but there's very little or no guidance at all on how to make a nice dinner or meal made up of several items that blend nicely. Or, more importantly, no explanation of *why* certain items should go together and others should not.
An average teacher shows you "how" to do it; a great teacher tells you "why" it's done that way.
"JavaScript For The World Wide Web" tells you "why" JavaScript works the way it does, and points you to several web sites that further clearly explain it's finer points.
The examples are very informative and cover a wide range of situations and techniques.
Each chapter is full of easy to understand examples, and the appendix that covers the JavaScript object table is a gold mine
all by itself.
The best part about this book is that you are shown how to write cross-broswer compliant JavaScript that isn't huge and confusing.
This book is so important to me that I keep it next to my PC, right beside my O'Reilly JavaScript book (the one with the rhino on the cover).
If you have never programmed a line of code in your life, this book will help get you started.
Don't be afraid of writing code that won't work; there's lots of places on the WWW that are full of experienced programmers willing to help.
This book is great place to start. :)
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Most recent customer reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars Examples+ Learning-
If you want to just copy code from the book and paste it on your websites, this is the book for you. In which case, you may as well download JavaScripts from some website. Read more
Published on Aug. 15 2003 by Josh Hayden
2.0 out of 5 stars Not recommended
I bought this book to learn how to write JavaScript, and all it does is show me the ones that you CAN do if you want to copy and paste it into your web page. Read more
Published on July 19 2003 by Tahna Banse
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for newbies and seasoned pros
I will never need to buy another JavaScript book. This book covers all the basics and provides understandable examples with explanations. Read more
Published on May 2 2003 by jif101
5.0 out of 5 stars good
The book arrived very timely and in good condition.
Published on Feb. 28 2003 by Justin Morgan
4.0 out of 5 stars Just when you thought editions can't get better
Try as you might to take a class in JavaScript or implement scripts by using online resources, it remains on your to do list. Read more
Published on Nov. 6 2002 by Meryl K. Evans
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Beginner Book.
This is a good beginners book. Didn't get into really detailed programming but it covers enough for anyone starting out.
Published on Oct. 25 2002 by R. Mercer
2.0 out of 5 stars Not very helpful...
This book has alot of examples for accomplishing different tasks but was very light on explaining concepts and even syntax sometimes. Read more
Published on Sept. 9 2002 by Vince Neil
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