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Jeeves & Wooster: Introduction on Broadway [Import]

4 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.


Product Details

  • Actors: Stephen Fry, Hugh Laurie, Robert Daws, Richard Dixon, Mary Wimbush
  • Format: NTSC, Import
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: A&E Home Video
  • VHS Release Date: Nov. 11 1998
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • ASIN: 6304605536
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Top Customer Reviews

In this episode of Jeeves and Wooster, Jeeves steps out of his usual detached role and volunteers to live the nightlife to the full. This is not by choice, but because a friend of Bertie's is in trouble.
Rocky is a reclusive poet living off his monthly allowance from his aunt, but auntie wants the boy to write her letters telling of all the wonderful activities that go on after dark in the Big Apple. Desperate to stay out of sight, he begs Jeeves to go on the town for him and write a report which will be forwarded on to his aunt. This backfires (of course) with hilarious results in the usual Wodehouse tradition.
My favorite scene in this episode is when Jeeves joins Bertie for a duet on the piano.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xb664e3b4) out of 5 stars 1 review
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xb662b3a8) out of 5 stars I love the nightlife July 2 2000
By Ronald Bingham - Published on Amazon.com
In this episode of Jeeves and Wooster, Jeeves steps out of his usual detached role and volunteers to live the nightlife to the full. This is not by choice, but because a friend of Bertie's is in trouble.
Rocky is a reclusive poet living off his monthly allowance from his aunt, but auntie wants the boy to write her letters telling of all the wonderful activities that go on after dark in the Big Apple. Desperate to stay out of sight, he begs Jeeves to go on the town for him and write a report which will be forwarded on to his aunt. This backfires (of course) with hilarious results in the usual Wodehouse tradition.
My favorite scene in this episode is when Jeeves joins Bertie for a duet on the piano.


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