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Jeremiah Johnson [Blu-ray] (Bilingual)

4.5 out of 5 stars 104 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: Robert Redford
  • Directors: Sydney Pollack
  • Writers: Edward Anhalt
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English, French
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Canadian Home Video Rating : General Audience (G)
  • Studio: Warner Bros.
  • Release Date: May 1 2012
  • Run Time: 108 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 104 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B00752H96O
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,066 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)
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Product Description

Product Description

Jeremiah Johnson (BD)

Amazon.ca

After they first worked together on the 1966 film This Property Is Condemned, director Sydney Pollack and Robert Redford continued their long-lasting collaboration with this 1972 drama set during the mid-1800s, about one man's rugged effort to shed the burden of civilization and learn to survive in the wilderness of the Rocky Mountains. Will Geer is perfectly cast as the seasoned trapper who teaches Jeremiah Johnson (Redford) how to survive against harsh winters, close encounters with grizzly bears, and hostile Crow Indians. In the course of his adventure, Johnson marries the daughter of a Flathead Indian chief, forms a makeshift family, and ultimately assumes a mythic place in Rocky Mountain folklore. Shot entirely on location in Utah, the film boasts an abundance of breathtaking widescreen scenery, and the story (despite a PG rating) doesn't flinch from the brutality of the wilderness. In addition to the original theatrical trailer, remastered Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtrack, and informative production notes, the DVD also includes The Saga of Jeremiah Johnson, a promotional documentary on the making of the film. --Jeff Shannon --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
He was a big man, maybe even growing in physical stature with the growth of his myth; deadly with his Bowie knife and his gun alike. He'd been a fighter in the U.S.-Mexican war, but left the lowland's ways behind in favor of a mountain man's: the lonesome hunt, the wild outdoors, and the confrontation with nature rather than his fellow men. And he came to be known as "Crow Killer" and "Liver Eating Johns(t)on" when he took war to the Crow nation after they killed his wife.
Based on Raymond Thorp/Robert Bunker's "Crow Killer" and Vardis Fisher's "Mountain Man" and scripted by John Milius and Edward Anhalt - with input from frequent Redford/Pollack cooperator David Rayfiel - Sydney Pollack's and Robert Redford's 1972 movie loosely traces the mythical hunter's legend, opening with his arrival at the fort where he buys his first horse and gun. "Ride due west as the sun sets. Turn left at the Rocky Mountains," is a trader's goodnatured answer to Johnson's naive inquiry where to find "bear, beaver and other critters worth cash money when skinned." All too soon, he finds that his lowland skills no longer do him any good. He almost starves in the freezing mountainous winter before being taken in by old "griz" hunter Bear Claw Chris Lapp (Will Geer in a stand-out role - his and Redford's deadpan exchanges alone make this movie worth its price).
Setting out on his own again the following year Johnson fares better, even gaining the respect of a Crow warrior prosaically named Paints His Shirt Red (Joaquin Martinez), the first person he encountered in the mountains.
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Format: Blu-ray
Fans will be reasonably happy with this bluray release of "Jeremiah Johnson" (1972) without going overboard. Despite the evident lack of any restoration, a visual improvement is noticeable over the DVD format with sharper resolution and generally superior colour.

The film is a good choice for upgrading to High Definition in terms of both setting and subject matter. Locations in Utah double for the Rockies in this tale of a nineteenth century mountain man (Robert Redford) struggling to survive in a punishing environment. Drawn into a world of towering peaks, desolate snowfields and pine forests, we follow the character from his rejection of urban society through a series of testing challenges to carve out a life in the wilderness. Watch for the irony of "civilization" reaching out when Johnson feels compelled to violate a Crow burial ground while guiding cavalry to rescue stranded settlers. The decision and its consequences are a pivotal moment.

As the film is partly a study in solitude some scenes contain minimal dialogue and these serve to underline a real strength of Redford's craft. It is that of being not so much an actor as a "reactor" in the way events and people are reflected on his face, perhaps best demonstrated here in the cabin episode where Johnson grieves while his horse moves restlessly outside.

Supporting actors, Will Geer as the wily old trapper Bear Claw and Stefan Gierasch playing Del Gue ("...with an E"), are a delight and it's almost worth watching the movie for them alone.

The project was a favorite of Redford's, one which became a labour of love for him and director Sydney Pollack who even mortgaged his home at one point to help finance it. They provide a commentary on the bluay edition along with writer John Milius.

Recommended.
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Format: DVD
He was a big man, maybe even growing in physical stature with the growth of his myth; deadly with his Bowie knife and his gun alike. He'd been a fighter in the U.S.-Mexican war, but left the lowland's ways behind in favor of a mountain man's: the lonesome hunt, the wild outdoors, and the confrontation with nature rather than his fellow men. And he came to be known as "Crow Killer" and "Liver Eating Johns(t)on" when he took war to the Crow nation after they killed his wife.
Based on Raymond Thorp/Robert Bunker's "Crow Killer" and Vardis Fisher's "Mountain Man" and scripted by John Milius and Edward Anhalt - with input from frequent Redford/Pollack cooperator David Rayfiel - Sydney Pollack's and Robert Redford's 1972 movie loosely traces the mythical hunter's legend, opening with his arrival at the fort where he buys his first horse and gun. "Ride due west as the sun sets. Turn left at the Rocky Mountains," is a trader's goodnatured answer to Johnson's naive inquiry where to find "bear, beaver and other critters worth cash money when skinned." But soon he finds that his lowland skills no longer do him any good, almost starving in the freezing mountainous winter before being taken in by old "griz" hunter Bear Claw Chris Lapp (Will Geer in a stand-out role - his and Redford's deadpan exchanges alone make this movie worth its price).
Setting out on his own again the following year Johnson fares better, even gaining the respect of a Crow warrior prosaically named Paints His Shirt Red (Joaquin Martinez), the first person he encountered in the mountains.
Read more ›
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