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Jingo [Paperback]

Terry Pratchett , Stephen Briggs
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)

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Product Description

From School Library Journal

YA-Jingo, the twentieth Discworld novel to be published in the United States, is a worthy addition to the series. It's a quiet night. Maybe too quiet. Solid Jackson and his son are fishing the waters between Ankh-Morpork and Al-Khali when their boat runs aground. To their amazement, an iron chicken rises out of the water, followed shortly by the island of Leshp. Solid Jackson immediately claims the island as Ankh-Morpork territory. There's only one problem. Greasy Arif and his son are also fishing for Curious Squid, and Arif swears that the island belongs to Al-Khali. Both cities are determined to annex it. By jingo, this means war. Ankh-Morpork is outgunned and out-manned but the city's nobles don't plan to let that stop them from carrying on the noble traditions of chivalry and showing those Klatchians what's what. This book is just as funny, clever, and unpredictable as the previous titles. Pratchett fans will not be disappointed, and new readers will not be confused. Jingo expands upon the lives of characters from titles in the series, but readers don't need to be familiar with them to enjoy this one. It's fast-paced, with lots of twists and turns, unexpected events, and football.
Susan Salpini, Kings Park Library, Burke, VA
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal

Pratchett's best-known creation is "Discworld," in particular the fantastic medieval urban city-state Ankh-Morporkh, populated by humans, dwarves, and trolls aligned in a firm social pecking order. A keen observer of human behavior, Pratchett portrays nearly every conceivable type of Earthly people, and they work through social issues as the "Discworld" stories unfold. Jingo takes on discrimination and xenophobia as the crusty Sam Vimes, leader of the city's policing Watch, heads off war with the neighboring land of Klatch. Hogfather is a bit less accessible, possibly because most characters are so abstract. Discworld's equivalent of Santa Claus, the Hogfather has a price on his head. Death plays a large part, and his diminutive rodent counterpart, the Death of Rats, also appears. Death's granddaughter Susan is the worldly heroine who saves the day in this adventure involving the city's Magicians. Similar to the "Discworld" novel Reaper Man, Hogfather is an optional purchase. Jingo is highly recommended, especially if your patrons appreciate British humor. Nigel Planer is a stunning narrator in these stories, delivering a wide range of voices and styles while remaining wonderfully energetic and consistent.DDouglas C. Lord, Hartford P.L., CT
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Review

" 'Both his inventiveness and his moral shrewdness seem inexhaustible' A. S. Byatt Daily Mail"

From the Back Cover

DISCWORLD GOES TO WAR, WITH ARMIES OF SARDINES, WARRIORS, FISHERMEN, SQUID AND AT LEAST ONE VERY CAMP FOLLOWER.

As two armies march, Commander Vimes of Ankh-Morpork City Watch faces unpleasant foes who are out to get him...and that's just the people on his side. The enemy might be even worse.

Jingo, the 21st in Terry Pratchett's phenomenally successful Discworld series, makes the World Cup look like a friendly five-a-side. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Stephen Briggs is Terry Pratchett's chosen adaptor of his novels. Terry Pratchett is one of the most popular authors writing today. He lives behind a keyboard in Wiltshire and says he 'doesn't want to get a life, because it feels as though he's trying to lead three already'. He is the author of the phenomenally successful Discworld series.

From AudioFile

[Editor's Note: The following is a combined review with THE LAST CONTINENT.] -- This entry in Pratchett's popular Discworld series feature the usual crowd of eccentric people, drarves, trolls, werewolves, wizards, assassins, foreigners, and zombies, who inhabit the ancient city of Ankh-Morpork on the flat-earth Discworld, carried through space by the giant tortoise, Atuin. Hilarity and satire rule the day as two nations almost go to war over the appearance of a sometimes-here, sometimes not island. It's an enormously entertaining tidbit, nicely rendered by reader Tony Robinson, whose wry, lively, breezy British accents vary with the characterizations. Each character is distinct; he uses pitch, pacing, and a nasal twang to draw out both the character and the humor. D.R.W. © AudioFile 2000, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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