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Julie Of The Wolves (Rack) Paperback – Sep 4 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Katherine Tegen (Sept. 4 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060540958
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060540951
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 1.3 x 17.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 141 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (125 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #811,434 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

Miyax, like many adolescents, is torn. But unlike most, her choices may determine whether she lives or dies. At 13, an orphan, and unhappily married, Miyax runs away from her husband's parents' home, hoping to reach San Francisco and her pen pal. But she becomes lost in the vast Alaskan tundra, with no food, no shelter, and no idea which is the way to safety. Now, more than ever, she must look hard at who she really is. Is she Miyax, Eskimo girl of the old ways? Or is she Julie (her "gussak"-white people-name), the modernized teenager who must mock the traditional customs? And when a pack of wolves begins to accept her into their community, Miyax must learn to think like a wolf as well. If she trusts her Eskimo instincts, will she stand a chance of surviving? John Schoenherr's line drawings suggest rather than tell about the compelling experiences of a girl searching for answers in a bleak landscape that at first glance would seem to hold nothing. Fans of Jean Craighead George's stunning, Newberry Medal-winning coming-of-age story won't want to miss Julie (1994) and Julie's Wolf Pack (1998). (Ages 10 and older) --Emilie Coulter --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Jean Craighead George is the award-winning author of over eighty books for children and young adults. Her novel julie of the wolves won the Newbery Medal in 1973, and she has continued to write acclaimed picture books that celebrate the natural world. Her previous books with Wendell Minor include Everglades, Arctic Son, and Morning, Noon, and Night. Mrs. George lives in Chappaqua, New York.


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First Sentence
MIYAX PUSHED BACK THE HOOD OF HER sealskin parka and looked at the Arctic sun. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By "jmreflect" on Jan. 9 2004
Format: Paperback
I found the ending of this book quite disturbing. For most of the novel, the author portrays the arctic environment in general and wolves specifically in a sensitive manner. However, in the final pages, Julie's father kills the hero wolf by shooting it from an airplane. The author concludes by essentially shrugging the whole thing off. Julie and her dad reunite, and what happened to the wolf (who had saved her life) is depicted as something that's too bad but cannot be helped. Further, it is suggested that this is the way things are going to be and that's that. A bad ending and a bad environmental message to send to young readers.
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By michael on March 25 2004
Format: Paperback
This book was great. It's about a young 13-year-old Eskimo girl, called Miyax, who is married to a boy called Daniel and lives with his parents. Miyax then runs away from Daniel and his family, because of the way she was treated. She plans to work her way to San Francisco, where she would live with her pen pal, but she then finds herself lost in a large tundra and depends on wolves to live. By observing a pack she found how to communicate with the wolves and...
One of my reasons why I liked this book is, it's so descriptive. You can easily picture the characters and their surroundings just by reading a few sentences. Such as this quote, "Her face was pearl-round and her nose was flat. Her black eyes, which slanted gracefully, were moist and sparkling."
Another reason why I like this book is, it gives me an idea of how the environment of Alaska is, and how the old, traditional culture of the Eskimos was like. I also like how the book described the relationship between people, and the nature around them, and how they learned how to survive in the wilderness just by observing animals- how to hunt, where to find food, and how to defend yourself against another predator. This quote describes what I mean, "Next she noted that the grasses grew in different spota than the mosses, and the more she studied, the more the face of the tundra emerged; a face that could tell her which way was north, if she had listened more carefully to Kapugen."
My most favorite part of this book was when Miyax begins playing with the puppies of the pack, Zing, Zit, Sister, and Kapu. This reminds me of how enjoyable life can be with friends and family.
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By A Customer on March 4 2004
Format: Paperback
Imagine a situation where wolves were your friends and family instead of people. And you learn to love your wolf pack. This is the situation in the adventurous book Julie of the Wolves, written by jean Craighead George. But one day changes everyones perspective.
It began when Julie's Aunt took her away from Kapugen, her father, to attend school and went to Barrow. Julie was thirteen and old enough to marry. Kapugen happened to meet Nusan, her mother-in-law, in that town. She had said that Julie had ran off and died. But Nusan didn't really know what had happened to Julie. Julie was gone for a very long time after all and most people thought that she died. But Julie was on the tundra with the gentle wolf pack and its kind leader, Amaroq, but Kapugen had killed him and Julie still had the painful memories of that day. But Kapugen always called her Miyax. He was the only person allowed to call her Miyax. Like most Eskimo-Julie has two names, English and Eskimo-Julie Edwards and Miyax Kapugen. But she wondered what would happen to her wolves.
After spending a long time with her pack, Julie picks up the wolf language. She howls and whimpers. And the wolves speak back. She knows what they're feeling by her own natural instinct. But not exactly what they're thinking. After a while, Julie decides to leave Kapu, her wolf and his pack, to go home and live with Kapugen. She is worried that her wolves will follow her and Kapugen finds then because he will shoot her wolves. "Kapugen is like all Eskimo hunters. He will say, 'The wolf gave himself to me'."-Julie of the Wolves.
Julie goes on an adventure to go and find her wolves. To try and make them understand to stay away from Kapugen or he will shoot them. She is very protective of her wolves because they saved her life.
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By A Customer on Dec 17 2003
Format: Paperback
Julie of the Wolves When Miyax was very young her mother died and she was sent to live with her aunt. At the age of thirteen she had to get married and live with her husband Daniel and his parents. She ran away because Daniel mistreated her. While trying to find her way to San Francisco, California She got lost in the wilderness. She lived with the wolves in the tundra and became part of their family.
She wanted to live with her pen pal Am. Amy called her Julie. Miyax found a bird and named it Tornait, spirit of the birds. One day the hunters killed Amaroq the leader of the wolves. She decided to live in the tundra. They told her Kapugen, her father was still alive. Miyax wanted to live with her father, but founds out that he lived a new life style, not the Eskimo way. Will she go back or stay with the wolves?
I think Miyax was smart because she made a name for each wolf cub. Like Sister, Jello, and Kapu. I also think she�s very smart because she studied the wolves� movements and learned enough to be accepted in the pack. Amaroq is a very good leader. Also a row model for the cubs like Kapu. Because when Amaroq died Kapu became leader.
I really liked this book. Because it shows how far Miyax would go to get a better life. I also liked it because it talks about wolves, and how each wolf is different from each other. I recommend this book to any body that likes animals. Specially wolves, or dogs.
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