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Justice League of America - Archives, VOL 06 Hardcover – Jul 1 2000


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (July 1 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563896257
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563896255
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 2.5 x 25.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 830 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,442,080 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Hardcover
I read the 6th Volume most recently, but this review might apply to the entire JLA ARCHIVES series. The stories in the series improve a bit as time goes on, but the difference from volume to volume is barely perceptible.
You'll have trouble finding a more colorful and bizarre collection of popcorn-science-fiction concepts in any novel or collection of stories; not in comics, not in Larry Niven or in Isaac Asimov, none of those guys. The characters and dialog may seem awkward and stilted (even by the standards of 1960's comics writing), but the inherent weirdness and originality blazes right on through.
With the possible exception of Stan Lee, Gardner Fox is the single most influential writer in American comics. In addition to the Justice League, he created The Flash, The Atom, Hawkman, and the 1940's Justice Society of America (and numerous others I can't think of right now). Along with editor Julius Schwartz, he revamped most of those characters in the late 1950's to create what we call the Silver Age of comics. A list of Fox's literary successors includes comics writers Cary Bates, Mark Waid, and Grant Morrison.
Mike Sekowsky's artwork is perfectly suited to represent the various alien worlds and super-science characters that recur throughout the stories, even if his superheroes usually look a little off (except Wonder Woman).
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By A Customer on May 25 2001
Format: Hardcover
This volume contains stories which were a bit removed from the previous ones and characters like Metamorpho (who refused to join) and the Spectre found themselves involved within the adventures of the JLA. One could see the "camp" flavor was here upon us, just months before the 1966 Batman TV series premiered.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Essential Gardner Fox / Mike Sekowsky April 1 2002
By miles@riverside - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I read the 6th Volume most recently, but this review might apply to the entire JLA ARCHIVES series. The stories in the series improve a bit as time goes on, but the difference from volume to volume is barely perceptible.
You'll have trouble finding a more colorful and bizarre collection of popcorn-science-fiction concepts in any novel or collection of stories; not in comics, not in Larry Niven or in Isaac Asimov, none of those guys. The characters and dialog may seem awkward and stilted (even by the standards of 1960's comics writing), but the inherent weirdness and originality blazes right on through.
With the possible exception of Stan Lee, Gardner Fox is the single most influential writer in American comics. In addition to the Justice League, he created The Flash, The Atom, Hawkman, and the 1940's Justice Society of America (and numerous others I can't think of right now). Along with editor Julius Schwartz, he revamped most of those characters in the late 1950's to create what we call the Silver Age of comics. A list of Fox's literary successors includes comics writers Cary Bates, Mark Waid, and Grant Morrison.
Mike Sekowsky's artwork is perfectly suited to represent the various alien worlds and super-science characters that recur throughout the stories, even if his superheroes usually look a little off (except Wonder Woman).
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Metamorpho says "No!" But you will say "Yes!!" to this one. Jan. 16 2005
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Artist Mike Sekowsky is not really known to today's fans and it is a shame that he is not, because the man could draw. Give him a cosmic epic, a crook story, a science fiction or a fantasy based world and he could do it without missing a beat. There was a sense of whimsy in his work that you do not see today.

The second story, "Metamporpho Says No!" has the freak of a thousand elements turning down the League. Man, when I read that story as a child I wondered who the heck he was to turn down the JLA, but now I could see why.

The Key, The Shaggy Man, The Royal Flush Gang all appear. It is a tribute to the series creators that these characters are still around today in one form or another. Of course there is the treat of another crossover with the JSA and the Spectre makes his appearance fighting things on a cosmic scale with the help of the Atom.

It is worth the price alone to go to page 165 and watch the JSA belt Solomon Grundy with pies. You heard me right, pies!

Another gem in this line of archives. Sometimes the stories were silly, sometimes they didn't make as much sense as they should, but they were fun.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Classic tales of teamwork, friendship, and justice Sept. 20 2007
By OAKSHAMAN - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I held off buying the DC Archive editions for years because of the hefty price. Then I bought a couple used and I saw that they are worth every penny. At least they are worth it if you grew up with these titles. It was amazing how many of these stories (and specific panels) that I personally remembered after nearly 50 years.

Volume six contains stories originally published in Justice League of America #41-50. The highlight of this volume is probably Metamorpho's refusal of full League membership (though he did agree to "standby membership" and actually made a brief appearence in another story in this volume.) It should be noted that it is in this collection that the classic "go-go checks" started to appear at the top of the cover. These are the issues that coincided with the super-hero craze of '66 (the year that the Batman television show appeared.)

These stories look better on the high-grade, glossy paper than they did when first printed- and much, much better than they look on old, yellow newsprint. The maroon leatherette covers (with the Justice League of America logo embossed in silver) are first rate- though I would never take the heavy, glossy jackets off of them.

Treat yourself to the age of true heroes.
This JLA Archive saves me not only money but the time it would take to locate the original. April 23 2014
By Morgan Painter - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The new printing makes the colors brighter than ever. Plus you don't have to leaf through those endless ads for 'Sea Monkeys.' And such a deal. It would cost a small fortune to get these classics in the original comic book form. The service was fast and the book arrived in perfect condition since it was extremely well packaged. I sure hope they reprint more in this series.
Tremendously entertaining, a slice of essential comics history June 30 2013
By J K Carrier - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Another imaginative and action-packed series of stories by writer Gardner Fox and artist Mike Sekowsky. This run of stories, first published from 1965-1966, introduced a number of classic villains: The card-themed Royal Flush Gang, the brutish Shaggy Man, and the bizarre energy-being The Unimaginable. The old-time heroes of the Justice Society and Metamorpho the Element Man put in guest-appearances. The heroes are challenged both physically and mentally, as each story resolves around a mystery or puzzle that has to be solved before they can defeat the bad guys. It's a formula of sorts, but Fox never runs out of crazy, colorful variations on his theme.

There are two noteworthy changes in this volume. The artwork gets a visible upgrade, as Mike Sekowsky's pencil art is now being finished by a number of different inkers: Frank Giacoia, Sid Greene, and Joe Giella. No offense to the previous inker, Bernard Sachs, but these fellows give the artwork much more detail and drama than it had before.

The other change is that the Batman television show debuted. You can tell, because Batman is suddenly much more prominently featured in the stories and covers. DC Comics wasn't shy about capitalizing on his sudden popularity.

For fans of the superhero team genre, this is the foundational text. Fox and Sekowsky created the mold that everyone else followed. But more than anything else, it's terrifically well-crafted entertainment.


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