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KILL ALL THE LAWYERS (Solomon vs.Lord Series Book 3)
 
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KILL ALL THE LAWYERS (Solomon vs.Lord Series Book 3) [Kindle Edition]

Paul Levine

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Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. This clever, colorful thriller from former attorney Levine (The Deep-Blue Alibi, etc.) focuses as much on the age-old conflict between Mars and Venus as on delivering legal wisecracks and page-turning suspense. Miami defense attorney Steve Solomon and his partner in law and love, Victoria Lord, rarely see eye to eye. He bends the rules, and she plays by the book; he wants to buy a house, but she dreams of high-rise living. Housing is the least of their problems, however, when Steve's former client, convicted killer Dr. William Kreeger, discovers that Steve lost his case on purpose. The threats start with a 300-pound fish dangling from Steve's door and quickly escalate. But how does one outwit a lethal psychologist with a genius IQ? Levine ratchets up the tension with each development but never neglects the heart of the story—his characters. The wily, rough-around-the-edges Steve, the Manolo-loving Victoria or Steve's anagram-obsessed and utterly endearing nephew are each drawn with a fine hand, making them feel more like friends than figments of Levine's imagination. As a result, readers will leave this series entry with the hope that many more will be forthcoming. (Sept.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"Levine ratchets up the tension with each development but never neglects the heart of the story-his characters.... readers will leave this series entry with the hope that many more will be forthcoming."—Publishers Weekly, starred review

Product Details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 440 KB
  • Print Length: 367 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0440242754
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Nittany Valley Productions, Inc. (Nov. 7 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007UPTH6Q
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #28,004 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  165 reviews
26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A different, darker entry Sept. 1 2006
By Gerald So - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
At 352 pages, Kill All the Lawyers is the shortest Solomon vs. Lord book, but like the other two, it is expertly paced. I don't think it could get more harrowing, with "Dr. Bill" Kreeger turning Steve's every good intention against him in a bid to tear apart his life with Victoria and Bobby.

One mark of great characters is the range of stories they allow you to tell, from lightly comedic to absolutely grave. I'm right there with them.
29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great Title! Feb. 15 2012
By coalpuss - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I was so looking forward to reading this, since the previous two in the series were enjoyable. Maybe it was just me this time, but the bad guy being a pedophile could not make me laugh - at all. Murder apparently doesn't bother me, but this vile act does. Also, the bickering between Solomon and Lord got a bit tired for me. The jokes and t-shirts are still worth it and maybe I just don't want to see Bobby grow up? If there is another in the series, I will for sure read it with fingers crossed.
16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Terrific series continues Sept. 25 2006
By Craig Clarke - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Imagine awakening to a 300-pound marlin stuck in your front door. A sign of animosity perhaps? Steve Solomon thinks so, and he knows who it is from: Pop psychologist / radio host William Kreeger (a.k.a. "Dr. Bill") is the only client whose case Steve deliberately lost, ensuring Kreeger was sent to prison. Now, after six years, Dr. Bill is out and wants revenge.

Sound like Cape Fear? Well, that's not too surprising, given how author Paul Levine has shown himself to be a big John D. MacDonald fan. But it's just the beginning of Kill All the Lawyers, the third entry in Levine's bestselling romantic-comedy / legal-thriller series begun with Solomon vs. Lord and continued with The Deep Blue Alibi (a play on MacDonald's The Deep Blue Good-by).

Despite the source of its title (Henry VI, Part 2), Levine has no Shakespearean aspirations; all he wants is for his readers to have a good time and get hooked on his characters. After the first two novels, I was definitely hooked and very eager to get my copy of Kill All the Lawyers. Levine writes his characters with just the right amount of detail -- they're reportedly based on real people. This is all the better to project ourselves onto, and ideal for both comedy and pathos, of which there are both in plenteous amounts.

Solomon and Lord have their usual relationship / partnership issues: Are they so different that they're not right for each other? Steve won't "whore for banks and insurance companies" to upgrade the practice and rejects every property Victoria finds for them to live in. Is he holding her back? And who is the nubile young girl who sunbathes nude at Kreeger's home, yet who calls him "Uncle Bill"? And why is she naked every time Steve confronts her, Victoria would like to know.

Nephew Bobby gets more page-time in Kill All the Lawyers, as he finds out his mother Janice is out of jail and wants her son back, and he works on getting a girlfriend, local "Juban" girl Maria Munoz-Goldberg, by helping her with her homework -- school-related get-togethers that Bobby hopes will lead to extracurricular activities. Uncle Steve's guidance towards "purity as maturity" is not the kind of advice Bobby wants. In all of these cases, advice is sought from surprising sources.

Just like its predecessors, Kill All the Lawyers is rife with pop culture references. (I was shocked, shocked to find throwaway lines referencing both Casablanca and The Treasure of the Sierra Madre.) Plus, there are twelve new "Solomon's Laws" that delight just as much as the ones that came before. I don't see how Levine can keep up this pace of productivity -- just thinking about it makes me tired. But when he does, I'll be right there to follow along with Steve, Victoria, Bobby, and the wonderful recurring cast of supporting characters as the loving conflict continues (along with the amusing cover art).
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Victoria Vacillates...Again April 4 2007
By Kara J. Jorges - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
The mismatched pair of Solomon and Lord is back for their third installment, this time dealing with a murderous ex-client of Steve's. Years ago when Steve was representing Dr. Bill Kreeger on a murder charge, he found evidence of just how cold and sociopathic the doctor was, and did something a little unethical to get him put away. Now Dr. Kreeger is a radio shrink, and keeps lambasting Steve on the air, when he isn't going out of the way to be Steve's best buddy. Steve's partner in law and life, Victoria Lord, is disgusted with Steve's lack of ethics and starts to worry she may be doing the wrong thing moving in with him. Plus, Steve's nephew Bobby is hitting puberty, and along with his interest in girls, Bobby also wants to rekindle a relationship with his drug-addled, abusive mother. While Steve does mental battle with Dr. Kreeger, he keeps getting arrested for assault--on the radio. Will he be able to hold it all together and put Dr. Kreeger back behind bars, or will he wind up there himself?

While it has its share of chuckles and great, quotable lines (I love Solomon's Laws), the main story about Steve's struggle with Dr. Kreeger takes a backseat to matters between Steve and Victoria. That wouldn't necessarily be a bad thing, except it's just a rehash of exactly what went on between Victoria and Steve in their last book, The Deep Blue Alibi. Victoria vacillating over whether being with Steve is the right thing or not wasn't all that entertaining the first time around, and this time it really made the book drag. Steve's fears over losing Bobby are getting a little stale, too. It was hard to enjoy the author's wit while hoping the story would move along already. Steve is not the typical male lead, behaving irresponsibly and sometimes childishly, but that's his charm. Somehow, this guy who does everything the wrong way manages to get it right. In this book, however, Steve seems to be at a loss as to what's going on around him, and it just doesn't fit with his character. When things work themselves out in the end, it's more dumb luck than any planning on Steve's part.

This is a series definitely worth reading...so far. However, the author really needs to move things along between Steve and Victoria. Surely there must be some way to make the differences in the way they operate into a good plot, without having them wonder if they belong together...again. There is a good cast of eclectic characters here, between Steve and Victoria, Steve's dad, Victoria's mother, and Bobby, not to mention the colorful side characters. It's a shame they keep rehashing the same story, but I'll read at least one more Solomon vs. Lord novel before I give up.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not quite as good as its predecessors Feb. 2 2007
By Debra Hamel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Steve Solomon is beset on a number of fronts in Kill All the Lawyers, the third installment in Paul Levine's series of legal whodunits. The most worrying of his concerns is that a certain Dr. William Kreeger--former client, celebrity psychiatrist, and sociopath--is out of prison and out to punish Steve for having lost his case. Meanwhile, Steve's father, disgraced judge Herbert T. Solomon, has gone Orthodox. Steve's sister Janice has found Jesus in rehab. And Steve's nephew Bobby has found the "harlot-in-training" down the street. To top it off, Victoria Lord, Steve's law partner and lover, is having doubts about their relationship. She spends most of this book agonizing over her decision to move in with him.

Steve has found a worthy nemesis in his Dr. Phil-ish celebridoc, whose motives remain a mystery for the better part of the book. Ultimately Kreeger's story merges nicely with those of Bobby and Bobby's mother--who has shown up in Miami with her own brand of menace, the threat of removing Bobby from Steve's care. But it's unfortunate that Victoria takes a back seat in this one. Her relationship with Steve is less interesting here than in previous outings. Too little is made of Herbert Solomon, too, who shows up now and again to spout some Yiddishism and then exits the story. On a brighter note, there is some nice development in the relationship between Steve and Victoria's mother Irene, a woman at once magisterial and tawdry--and with a penchant for naked display. We watched Irene cavort naked poolside in Deep Blue Alibi. This time around, alas, we are made to look on as she splays her legs for an intimate waxing. The scene falls short of funny and into the realm of the shudder-inducing.

Kill All the Lawyers seems a little stale in comparison with the first two books in the series, the characters often more cartoonish than not. I'm hoping the next outing finds them a bit more nuanced than they were allowed to be here.

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