More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

Ken Burns Jazz


Available from these sellers.
3 used from CDN$ 107.33 1 collectible from CDN$ 247.01

Product Details

  • Actors: Keith David, Charles J. Correll, Freeman F. Gosden, Edward R. Murrow, Richard Nixon
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Number of tapes: 10
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Warner
  • VHS Release Date: Nov. 1 2001
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (129 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000050HEQ
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #821 in Video (See Top 100 in Video)


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Bob Fancher on Feb. 11 2003
Format: DVD
Jazz is a relatively recent interest for me--maybe half a dozen years. I'd learned about scattered fragments of jazz, but never developed a systematic understanding, a clear orientation--though a couple of times I'd tried: I bought Gary Giddons' "Visions of Jazz," for instance, which is very good but just didn't capture my imagination.
Ken Burns' "Jazz" gave me what I've been wanting for years--a clear, evocative, comprehensive way into the genre as a whole.
Okay, it may not be the last word on the history of jazz. Yeah, some things really irritated me--like the slighting, mentioned by many, of Bill Evans, and the excessive excision of many white musicians to make the generally accurate point that jazz springs more from the experience of Black Americans. (Hint to Burns: You make your argument stronger by showing how apparently contrary data fit, not by leaving them out.) But over all, I found this a very helpful overview. And I enjoyed getting to know the biographies of, and the personal relations among, the players.
You won't likely get such an orientation from buying a few of the original CDs *instead* of the "Jazz" series. Few of us have the ears or training to discern what's taught in this series. You'd be highly unlikely to realize that, for instance, what was new with Be-Bop is improvising on the underlying chord changes rather than the melody. You'd really have to be perceptive and paying attention to notice what distinguishes Kansas City jazz from New Orleans jazz from New York jazz from West Coast jazz. And *no* album can place *itself* in history. For instance, you cannot learn from listening to an album featuring Coleman Hawkins-or Charlie Christian or Kenny Clarke--that *before* that album people played very differently.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 18 2004
Format: DVD
This series played a major role in turning me into a ardent lover of jazz: the sights and sounds you'll encounter are truly memorable and moving, whetting your appetite for more. But as so many other jazz fans have noted, vast swathes of the music (like the last four decades) are brazenly and inexcusably ignored in favor of portraying the ultra-narrow, retrograde Wynton Marsalis/Stanley Crouch version of jazz history--a perspective most jazz fans and musicians vehemently disagree with. If you'd like more balanced, less biased, more insightful histories of jazz, check out the books Jazz 101 by John F. Szwed and The History of Jazz by Ted Gioia, for starters.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on Jan. 22 2004
Format: DVD
It's interesting that the majority of positive reviews, here and elsewhere, come from people who A) confess that they are relative newcomers to the music, and B) find space to take potshots at jazz "snobs" who don't like the series. Well, derogatory word or not, shouldn't a snob or elitist have a better idea of whether this film does justice to its subject?
Let's pretend that I don't know the first thing about the Kennedy assasination; in fact, let's say I didn't even know he was shot. Until I see Stone's JFK movie. And then when people who have explored the story for years start poking holes in Stone's account, I dismiss them as snobs. Or let's say I've watched Tammy and the T-Rex and I start going on about how realistic it is, and I shoot down any scientific or cinematographic objections as elitist party-pooping....
Look, this is not a great film, and the jazz-initiated needn't apologize for saying so. You've got a filmmaker who didn't know the slightest thing about the music when he started, and who relied heavily on the biased ear-whisperings of two of the most conservative, narrow jazz spokesmen you could find. If you want a lengthy bio of Louis Armstrong, it's here. If you want to learn about the Blues, you will. But if you want an in-depth look at what happens in bop, post-bop, free jazz, and early fusion, you won't learn much, if anything. You may walk away thinking that Elvin Jones played on Giant Steps, that Cecil Taylor was a charlatan, that "Hello Dolly" is more worthy of discussion than any of the high water marks of the 1960s, that there was only one true jazz record released in the 1970s. I mean, the more I think about this, the worse it gets.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Molly on Dec 28 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A very complete history of Jazz, although some may wish there was more about the "modern" era of Jazz. The series contains some wonderful clips of musicians playing the music.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Zauis on Jan. 13 2011
Format: DVD
Generally, I would recommend this to the average person as a great starting-off point for learning about jazz. I am no expert on Jazz but I have played drums in a jazz band and have been listening to jazz for many years and this documentary worked for me. OK, maybe it's not perfect but overall it gave me a pretty good understanding of the history of jazz. There's some great footage and still photos of many of the jazz greats. Also, the series contains some very good interviews with the players and people who were there at the time. I am not aware of any other documentary that handles the history of jazz in such a comprehensive manner.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 11 2001
Format: DVD
interesting in parts but too exclusionist to survive as a documentary. where is reference to bill evans, among others? blacks may have invented jazz, but they don't own it. the ethnic agenda underlying this history is deeply disturbing. ken burns should redo the documentary, but with several advisors of different persuasions, not just one with a colored ax to grind.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Most recent customer reviews

Search


Feedback