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Kid A


Price: CDN$ 12.68 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Usually ships within 1 to 2 months.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
13 new from CDN$ 10.75 23 used from CDN$ 0.77

Frequently Bought Together

Kid A + Ok Computer (Vinyl) + The Bends
Price For All Three: CDN$ 53.52

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  • Usually ships within 1 to 2 months.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • Ok Computer (Vinyl) CDN$ 28.32

    Usually ships within 1 to 2 months.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping. Details

  • The Bends CDN$ 12.52

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details


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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Oct. 1 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Warner Music Canada
  • ASIN: B00004XONN
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,917 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #7,759 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Everything In Its Right Place
2. Kid A
3. The National Anthem
4. How To Disappear Completely
5. Treefingers
6. Optimistic
7. In Limbo
8. Idioteque
9. Morning Bell
10. Motion Picture Soundtrack


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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By The Kurtenbach on April 7 2011
Format: LP Record
This is now the best sounding album in my house. No need to get into how good the album itself is - I think you've already determined that for yourself. This rating has to do with the sonics and art of the record. This is released as 2 x 10", so if you're new to collecting records then yes, it's just slightly smaller than most of the other albums you've been buying. It immediately feels substantial, by weight of the records and thickness of the sleeve. The sound on playback is rich, deep and well separated. Do not hesitate to add this to your collection, as it has none of the suspicious drawbacks (thin records, poor production, bad pressing, weak packaging, etc.) of purchasing a record sight unseen.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Nov. 17 2004
Format: Audio CD
In the year 2000, Radiohead ditched its former "real" rock sound for Pink-Floydian, electronic post-rock. The result was "Kid A," where they relearned everything they knew about music from scratch. Some people loved it. Some didn't get it, and felt it was "pretentious." But there's one undeniable thing -- this chilly, eerie collection is a marvelously complex piece of work.

An ominous keyboard melody and gibberish vocals open the album in "Everything In Its Right Place," sounding a bit like a possessed radio. Then the fuzz and hums kick in, adding a spacey dimension to an already strange melody. A drum melody kicks in in the title track, followed by the ghostly rock of "National Anthem" and unearthly lament of "How to Disappear Completely."

Another "real" rock song kicks in with the darkly desperate "Optimistic," flanked by a pair of softer, eerie songs. "Idioteque" throws all the rules out the window with sharp percussion backed by weird waves of sound and Thom Yorke's high vocals. And finally it ends on the same note it began -- a stately organ -- in the harp-accented "Motion Picture Soundtrack."

In a musical world where anything that has a guitar can be called "rock," it's difficult to find music that is really creative. It's even harder to find a band that is willing to take risks, and expand their art. But those things can be found in Radiohead, and the evidence is in "Kid A" -- whether listeners think it's a wild success or a pretentious failure, it has to be admitted that it takes guts to try out something this different.

Thom Yorke's vocals are often described as whiny, but they are suited to the music here.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By B on July 10 2004
Format: Audio CD
I'm not going to say that Kid A is the best radiohead cd, but it's my favorite. I decided this while I listened to it in its uninterrupted glory during a two hour late night walk through suburbia with my dog. It is an experience; this album and Amnesiac are the ones you have to hear all the way through in one go because it's hard to appreciate most of the tracks by themselves, because they don't really make sense in small pieces. If someone played you treefingers or in limbo by itself you might not remember what they sounded like afterwards at all.
But it's hard to describe the experience. Everything in its Right Place is probably my favorite radiohead song ever. It defines the mood. Verse chorus verse does not exist starting now; Thom Yorke will mumble into his vocoder or whatever and then repeat short lines over and over in the songs where you can understand him (besides national anthem and morning bell). The acoustic songs like national anthem, optimistic and limbo are kind of uneventful because they really just float in the air for a while. Kid A and Treefingers are little more than atmosphere pieces, and Idioteque is an atmosphere piece with an unexpected club beat. Morning Bell, possibly the only "real" song on the cd, is kind of quietly intense, even more intense than the screaming horns and raging bassline in national anthem. And just when you thought it was all over, Motion Picture Soundtrack confuses you beyond all rational limits (there are even harps and a long long silence in the middle) and does something indescribable to your soul if you're really immersed in the music.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By picotheman on June 3 2004
Format: Audio CD
Few albums have ignited as much controversy as Kid A - ranging from the die-hard adherents, who think that Radiohead somehow invented music, to the equally die-hard critics, who accuse the band of churning out pretentious crap. Fortunately, a lot of that controversy has died down in the wake of Amensiac (generally tepid reactions) and Hail to the Thief (generally enthusiastic). With some distance, we can approach Kid A again, and take it for what it is.
It's true that Radiohead didn't invent music, and if we wanted to talk about the musical avant-garde, we'd have to face the fact that popular music is a full century behind classical in that regard. There's nothing that Radiohead is doing that breaks significantly from the tradition in which they are a part. However, when 99% of the music industry is still stuck on 3 chord harmonic progressions, any attempts to move ahead are more than welcome.
That being said, there's a lot to love about Kid A, and album I initially hated, then grew to respect, and finally to love (much like my parents). "Everything in its Right Place" plays with the ability of timbre to generate musical tension, while the initially jarring "National Anthem" makes more and more sense with each listen. The standout track on the first half, however, is "How to Disappear Completely," certainly Radiohead's masterpiece, a sustained and progressively intense ballad about feeling lost that literally melts away in the end.
It's become trite by now to say "you have to listen to the songs in order," but you'll notice that the second half of the CD, like the second half of OK Computer, plays like a concept album, with a general emotional flow in place of a concrete plot.
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