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King of the Wind: The Story of the Godolphin Arabian [Hardcover]

Marguerite Henry , Wesley Dennis
4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (49 customer reviews)
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Book Description

Nov. 1 1990
"Vivid portrayals of Morocco, France, and England during the 1700s are presented while the story unfolds. With its illustrations by Wesley Dennis, this is one of the most distinguished books of the year."--School Library Journal.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Description

From School Library Journal

Grade 4-8-The Newbery Medal-winning tale about a stallion, a stable boy, and their globe-spanning adventures.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

San Francisco Chronicle

..."told with dash and drama..."

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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First Sentence
THE morning fog had lifted, giving way to a clear day. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
4.9 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Could have told more of the real story... July 21 2003
Format:Hardcover
Marguerite Henry took great license in telling the story of the Godolphin Arabian, but it's likely there were two reasons she did so; first, because she based the majority of her novel on heavily romanticised reports like that which appeared in Western Horseman in 1949; second, to illustrate to young children what could happen to perfectly good horses that were considered worthless because of prejudice or unwillingness to see what was there.
The real Sham was born in Tunis and given by the Bey of Tunis to King Louis XV with a group of other horses. But there's no evidence that he was reduced to pulling a cart in the Paris streets before rescue by Edward Coke. Coke probably got him from the Duke of Lorraine, who'd gotten him from the King.
A contemporary described Sham as "beautiful but half-starved", so the rough sea voyage with the greedy staff is likely true, even if the cart-horse story is not. He also said that Sham (he spelled it Shami, and other accounts have "Scham") was temperamental and generally disliked by the stable hands. A vet who cared for Sham in his last years said he was built to sire champions: "his shoulders were deeper, and lay farther into his back, than those of any horse ever yet seen. Behind the shoulders, there was but a very small space ere the muscles of his loins rose exceedingly high, broad, and expanded, which were inserted into his hindquarters with greater strength and power than in any horse I believe ever yet seen of his dimensions, viz fifteen hands high."
Agba was real; there are portraits of the little horse with a handsome dark-skinned young man in flowing Arab dress and turban. Whether or not he was mute is debatable. Again, many of the later accounts have been greatly romanticised.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A childhood favourite Feb. 14 2014
By Sandy
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I was very happy to be able to buy one of my childhood favourites for my granddaughter so she can enjoy this touching tale
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "The king of the wind is loes." Jan. 3 2004
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
King of the wind is a great book. I am not a hores book person but I really liked this book. Sham was born with a singh of bad luk witch was the weat ear but he was also born with a white spot on his hind leg withc was good luk and that he would be a fast running hores. Sham, Agba,(is the mute boy who takes care of him) and a cat. Thoes three go through many things to gether and live many places. The book has a pretty happy ending and you should read it. I am going to give you about ten words of advice, GIVE THIS BOOK A TRY AND GO READ IT.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Book For All Ages! Aug. 26 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This will touch your heart in so many ways. It brings you into the life of a small boy and his special bond with a horse. You will follow their journey that goes many places.
The first time I picked up this book and read it I fell in love with it. I even now in my read this book at least once a year.
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By Amanda
Format:Paperback
This book tells the story of the unforgettable and never-ending friendship between agba and Sham, a Godolphin Arabian. This book made me cry because, though the ending was a happy one, it was tragic and very sad all at once. I think that anyone who has already had a cose connection with an animal or person and has been there when the person died whill understand Agba.
The moral of the book was set on the balance of good and bad. When Sham was born, Agba noticed a wheat's ear, which signifies evil. However, he also found the emblem of swiftness, a white spot situated on Sham's hind heel. At first, I thought these two signs would cancel each other out and Sham would be just a usual stable horse. However, because of the wheat's ear, Sham lived a poor life until the Earl of Godolphin found him; that is when Sham became a very lucky horse. Though Sham did not have the opportunity to become famous, his children took advantage of their swiftness and became very succesful race horses.
Though Sham lived in a poor environment for most of his life, he did everything that was in his power as a horse to make sure that his children wouldn,t have to live through the same misery. This reminds me of when my grand-parents moved to Canada. They didn't move to Canada for themselves; they moved for the children they were going to have. They didn't want their kids to suffer like they had to; they wanted to be able to se their children have a prosperous life.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Godolphin Arabian Jan. 29 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
KING OF THE WIND by Marguerite Henry, was a great book! I love how the battle between good and evil was portrayed. The way the white spot was the sign of swiftness and the wheat ear on Sham's chest foretold evil. Also, how these influenced Sham and Agba's life.
Sham is a Godolphin Arabian that lived in Morroco with his new horseboy, Agba. Sham only listens to Agba and even the most talented horse trainer cannot convince him otherwise. This book is about their journeys through life from living at a palace in Morroco to living nowhere on the streets of England. This book is very moving, and at times, sad. On the way through good and evil, Agba and Sham met a cat named Grimalkin who is very sweet and loving to Sham and Agba. Sham encounters a beauitful mare in Gog Magog, the best, Lady of Roxana. From there life is just as it was meant to be. I highlighly recommend this book !!
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Godolphin Arabian Jan. 29 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
KING OF THE WIND by Marguerite Henry, was a great book! I love how the battle between good and evil was portrayed. The way the white spot was the sign of swiftness and the wheat ear on Sham's chest foretold evil. Also, how these influenced Sham and Agba's life.
Sham is a Godolphin Arabian that lived in Morroco with his new horseboy, Agba. Sham only listens to Agba and even the most talented horse trainer cannot convince him otherwise. This book is about their journeys through life from living at a palace in Morroco to living nowhere on the streets of England. This book is very moving, and at times, sad. On the way through good and evil, Agba and Sham met a cat named Grimalkin who is very sweet and loving to Sham and Agba. Sham encounters a beauitful mare in Gog Magog, the best, Lady of Roxana. From there life is just as it was meant to be. I highly recommend this book !!
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