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Kitchen Paperback – Mar 1 1994


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Paperback, Mar 1 1994
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Washington Square Press; Original edition (March 1 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671880187
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671880187
  • Product Dimensions: 18 x 12.7 x 1.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 227 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (99 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #363,752 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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The place I like best in this world is the kitchen. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sam TOP 1000 REVIEWER on Nov. 15 2008
Format: Paperback
Kitchen by Banana Yoshimoto actually consists of two stories: Kitchen and Moonlight Shadow. Kitchen is just barely over a hundred pages long, and Moonlight Shadow is forty-four pages. Like her other novel, Hardboiled and Hard Luck, Kitchen is also about loss and moving on. Kitchen is well written and makes a great short read. Both of the stories are written in first person, so I was able to experience the emotions that the characters felt: their loneliness, their despair. I was hoping for more of an ending from Kitchen, but I sort of knew what would happen.

**MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS**

Kitchen is about Mikage Sakurai, whose parents are dead, and she was taken in by her grandparents. Her grandfather passed away, and then her grandmother. Now, Mikage is all alone, with no living relatives, with only the kitchen to console her. The sound of the refrigerator makes her forget her troubles, and allows her to sleep peacefully. While grieving, she meets Yuichi Tanabe, a man that goes to the same university as her, who used to know her grandmother, who helped her at the funeral. Mikage is taken in by Yuichi and his "mother," Eriko. They form a family, but suffer more loss.

Moonlight Shadow is about Satsuki, who has just suffered the loss of her boyfriend of four years, Hitoshi. She cannot sleep properly, and she started going jogging every morning. Satsuki meets an odd stranger, Urara, and then there is Hitoshi's eccentric younger brother, Hiiragi, who will help her deal with her loss in a surprising way.

Kitchen teaches you that no matter what happens, you have to continue living, because loss is a part of life.

Some passages I liked:
"Although I was raised with love, I was always lonely." (21)
"The night was so deathly silent that I felt I could hear the sound of stars moving across the heavens." (31)
"...[T]his moment, too, might become a dream." (41)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert S. Newman on Jan. 30 2001
Format: Paperback
I am happiest whenever I'm standing in front of a lot of bookshelves. On a gray winter afternoon, when the light seeps in from the frozen gray clouds and wet streets outside, I like to wonder what I will read next. Last time, I looked up at a shelf of Japanese literature and (boinggg!) Banana Yoshimoto's work fell down at my feet. I picked it up and realized that I had never read any of her books yet. The carpet was a kind of yucky green. My wife called from the kitchen to say that she was making curry lamb and okra with rice. I had opened KITCHEN at the same time. Unbelievable.
In the blue light of early morning, a thin orange edge to the clouds streaming off over the Atlantic Ocean, a wedge of geese flew by. I read this youthful tale of sadness and loss, loneliness and final reunion. I bit into some toast (crunch) with unsalted butter on it, plus some Scottish orange marmalade. I read more. In the end, I felt that I had read an excellent novel as written by a high school student. Gosh. But when the chips were down, and what I wanted was more than to curl up on the sofa (green velvet with Indian brocade cushions) with an entertaining novel, KITCHEN just didn't have what it took. "Cutesy" "Yuppie-esque" or "excruciatingly earnest" are adjectives that could apply. "You have to appreciate novels for what they are, Bob." I kept telling myself. But this one wasn't much. I remembered how I loved reading Balzac, Kawabata, Turgenev, Soseki, Mishima, Machado de Assis and Bulgakov. Their ghosts waved to me in the early morning light. But I just could not put KITCHEN alongside their works. Sorry, folks. I know most of you thought it was great, but I didn't. It is clear. It is youthful. It touches on human emotions. But not in a deep way. That's why. The end.
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By Reader Writer Runner TOP 50 REVIEWER on May 30 2011
Format: Paperback
"The place I like best in the world is the kitchen." So begins Banana Yoshimoto's off-beat, quirky yet charming novella. Both "Kitchen" and its accompanying story, "Moonlight Shadow," feature protagonists coping with grief and searching for comfort in seemingly endless uncertainty. But neither story imparts hopelessness; rather, they both highlight the daily joys of food, laughter, friends and city streets. I very much enjoyed the "Japanese style" of this book (brilliantly translated by Megan Backus) - its deceptive simplicity underscored with evocative imagery, whimsy and poignant philosophy.
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By Sarah Sammis on June 11 2004
Format: Paperback
Read the book in about half an hour. It's a bitter sweet tale of loss and friendship. I enjoyed this book much more than Amrita. Banana Yoshmoto is best at creating short scenes that flit from thought to thought which Kitchen does so well.
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Format: Paperback
Kitchen contains two stories, both of which concern a different young woman living her life in the aftermath of a terrible loss. In the title story, Mikage has just been left alone in the world after the passing of her grandmother, who was her last living relative. She is generously taken in by an acquaintance, a boy named Yuichi who knew her grandmother, and his transsexual mother Eriko. Eriko lets her stay for free as long as she promises to cook for them from time to time, and the three of them build a new family of sorts. Eventually, though, Mikage finds herself confronted with another tragedy.
The second story is called "Moonlight Shadow." Satsuki has lost a boyfriend in a car crash which also claimed the life of his younger brother's girlfriend. One day she meets a mysterious woman with a secret she wants to share. This story has a slight element of fantasy to it, a touching piece of magical realism.
The author has a deceptively simple style of writing which enables her to deal with weighty issues without them feeling oppressive. These works are deeply affecting, but they are poetic rather than doom-laden. I preferred the second story, which is tighter and has a definite resolution, whereas the first is more of a slice of life and though longer, felt a little incomplete. As always, I enjoyed the look at Japanese daily life.
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