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Knick Knack Paddy Whack [Paperback]

Ardal O'Hanlon
3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)

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First Sentence
I met Plunkett McKenna on Parnell Square when I was waiting for the bus home to Castlecock. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars A great portrayal of small-town life in Ireland July 19 2000
Format:Hardcover
This book is a very true portrayal of small-town life in Ireland; to me the plot wasn't such a big deal, I was engrossed by the character depictions, it felt like the ending was put in almost as an afterthought. This is simply great "observational" literature. I think that some of the low ratings for this book reflect a cultural mis-understanding/wedge between the Irish and Americans. Being an Irishman living in America, I can understand that the Irish sense of humor can seem shocking to folks here; I thought this book was hilarious, and it goes to show that humor is subjective. Paddy's verbal lashing out at everyone and everything around him is his way of dealing with the world. You can extend that to a lot of Irish people. Remember that Ireland has been a disenfranchised, colonised, oppressed, invaded state and that reflects on the people. Maybe when America has lost its empire, this kind of thing will go down much better!
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4.0 out of 5 stars I love Ardal even more! Feb. 11 2005
By Natalie
Format:Paperback
I am a big fan of the TV show 'Father Ted' that Ardal was on so I decided to check this book out. I LOVED it. I think my knowledge of Irish slang ('crack' means 'a good time')and humour helped me to enjoy it as much as I did. I found it very funny. It is by no means light, but it's very witty and insightful.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Ardal, I was disappointed June 29 2003
Format:Hardcover
Oh it had potential, it really did! If only he had gone through it a bit more, cleaned up a bit of the grammar and etc., we'd have quite a good piece before us. Ardal, I am disappointed.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A good first book by a talented comedian Feb. 17 2001
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
When I started reading this book I found it hard to put it down...picking it up at every free moment I had and continueing to read on. I must admit, though, that the "shocking conclusion" didn't actually shock very much, but for Ardal's first book it was very good. Will deffinately check out future books by this irish comedian!
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4.0 out of 5 stars A great portrayal of small-town life in Ireland July 20 2000
Format:Hardcover
This book is a very true portrayal of small-town life in Ireland; to me the plot wasn't such a big deal, I was engrossed by the character depictions, it felt like the ending was put in almost as an afterthought. This is simply great "observational" literature. I think that some of the low ratings for this book reflect a cultural mis-understanding/wedge between the Irish and Americans. Being an Irishman living in America, I can understand that the Irish sense of humor can seem shocking to folks here; I thought this book was hilarious, and it goes to show that humor is subjective. Paddy's verbal lashing out at everyone and everything around him is his way of dealing with the world. You can extend that to a lot of Irish people. Remember that Ireland has been a disenfranchised, colonised, oppressed, invaded state and that reflects on the people. Maybe when America has lost its empire, this kind of thing will go down much better!
Was this review helpful to you?
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Read July 10 2000
By Brenda
Format:Hardcover
Mr. O'Hanlon's debut novel will certainly be a memorable one for me. I was intrigued with his interpretation of small town life in Ireland. Although the author gives us a young woman's view through Francesca's Diary, the narrator, Patrick Scully, leaves the strongest impression. The author's characters are well developed and strong. The only thing I worried about in this debut was the extent of the language and some scenes.
Patrick Scully is a security guard in Dublin. He doesn't like Dublin because they are rude and not at all like the friendly folks in his hometown of Castlecock. When he comes home for a visit, he has a memorable experience that will affect his life and relationship with his on again-off again girlfriend Francesca. The reader is drawn through Scully, Francesca, and Xavier's lives, emotions, decisions, and outcomes.
Mr. O'Hanlon's story captures the struggling emotions youth experience when changing from teen to young adult. He captures their lack of faith in life, and lets the reader hear it through their brash, colorful words. It was an interesting read.
Brenda @ Myshelf.com
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