Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Tell the Publisher!
I'd like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Knights of the Sea: A Grim Tale of Murder, Politics, and Spoon Addiction [Paperback]

Paul Marlowe
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
List Price: CDN$ 16.10
Price: CDN$ 15.15 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
You Save: CDN$ 0.95 (6%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Usually ships within 3 to 5 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

April 1 2010
It's Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee, and all the Empire is preparing to celebrate. But between suffragists, assassins, submariners, Scots impersonators, by-elections, and aunts, having a quiet holiday is proving to be a tricky matter for Elliott Graven and Paisley DeLoup. And with Alexander Graham Bell hosting a meeting that threatens to plunge the world into war (not to mention making romance dashed difficult), it's all Elliott and Paisley can do to keep their heads above water. Especially after their ship sinks.

Product Details


Product Description

Review

"...the novel has multiple compelling features. It is a fast-paced blend of action-adventure, fantasy and historical novel, with the added elements of erudition, humour and wit. Marlowe's style is reminiscent of 19th century literature, yet timeless enough for a 21st century reader to grasp... Subtly and cleverly, author Paul Marlowe educates readers about the politics and preoccupations of late 19th century Canada." --Ruth Latta, CM Magazine, 25 June 2010

"Paul Marlowe’s style of humor is reminiscent of Neil Gaiman’s lighter works... if you enjoy dry wit, Victoriana/steampunk elements, and plucky teenagers saving the world, you’ll probably like Knights of the Sea. It’s an tale of high adventure that takes a humorous look at... well, pretty much everything, from politics to romance to lycanthropy. Give it a shot if you liked Stardust or Good Omens." --Kelly Lasiter, fantasyliterature.com

"...the novel has multiple compelling features. It is a fast-paced blend of action-adventure, fantasy and historical novel, with the added elements of erudition, humour and wit. Marlowe's style is reminiscent of 19th century literature, yet timeless enough for a 21st century reader to grasp... Subtly and cleverly, author Paul Marlowe educates readers about the politics and preoccupations of late 19th century Canada." --Ruth Latta, CM Magazine

"The quirkiness reminds me of Sue Townsend’s Adrian Mole series, only with a lot more at stake, say, than the embarrassment of a trip to the ER following unsuccessful glue-sniffing. This is not to say Marlowe doesn’t land Elliot in embarrassing situations. At least Adrian didn’t also need to diffuse bombs, or associate with suffragettes, German submarine pilots, werewolves, and the Canadian Minister of Justice... The characters are all spot on, from one improbable moment to the next. Marlowe’s offbeat humor can even be found in parts of the book where it’s least expected." --Janette King, Historical Novels Review

"Our young main characters, Elliott Graven and Paisley DeLoup are enjoyable and most likeable. Mr. Marlowe has done a fantastic job of fleshing them out so that you really get involved in their story. You find yourself fearing for their safety and cheering them on at various points in the plot. As well, all the secondary, and even very minor, characters are unique, odd and extremely entertaining. The story rolls along quite smoothly and quickly from our introduction to Elliott on the Halifax Express in chapter one and all through his near death experiences. Paisley's half of the story includes her many encounters with Adelmo the German adventurer and her quest to learn more about her family's strange legacy. Add on all their bizarre adventures in the small town of Baddeck, Nova Scotia, mix in the author's array of historical facts from the period and you have quite the rollicking tale. I highly recommend this as a fabulous piece of Canadian literature." --Lee Ann Farruga, THE DOMINION DISPATCH, Volume 1 Issue 2

"Spooky, quirky, strange, and very funny." --Poe's Deadly Daughters Mystery Blog

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

5 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Drily hilarious June 4 2010
Format:Paperback
I was first drawn to Knights of the Sea by the hilarious cover art. Now, having read the book, I can say two things: First, the art is accurate! Every element of the cover design ' wolf, capsized boat, ghostly damsel, and lemon ' is present in the plot. Second, the book is just as funny as the cover, and in a very good way.

In the previous THE WELLBORN CONSPIRACY book, Sporeville, Elliott Graven made a powerful enemy in the dastardly Professor Strange. As Knights of the Sea begins, he survives a murder attempt by one of Strange's henchmen. He then arrives for a visit with his lycanthropic sweetheart, Paisley, hoping for a peaceful and idyllic summer to take his mind off mortal danger for a while. Instead, he finds that Paisley is smitten by a dashing German submarine builder and that yet another deadly plot is in the works.

Knights of the Sea begins with a brief summary of Sporeville, which serves two purposes: it's funny, and it infodumps-without-infodumping, bringing readers up to speed on previous events without interrupting the story proper to do so. This is followed by a Dramatis Personae. This too is humorous, and provides a handy reference when the large cast becomes a little unwieldy to hold in one's brain.

The drily hilarious tone continues throughout the novel. As an example, in the following passage Elliott is trying to decide how to introduce himself to a new acquaintance:

"'Mrs Anna Leonowens. I am organizing the new Victoria School of Arts.'

Too late, Elliott realized he would be expected to introduce himself, now. His mind went blank. In its dark, aching recesses, only ridiculous false names appeared. Nemo Jimmerson. No. Montagu'. Van Buren. No, that would be as bad as using his real name.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Drily hilarious June 4 2010
By Kelly (Fantasy Literature) - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I was first drawn to Knights of the Sea by the hilarious cover art. Now, having read the book, I can say two things: First, the art is accurate! Every element of the cover design -- wolf, capsized boat, ghostly damsel, and lemon -- is present in the plot. Second, the book is just as funny as the cover, and in a very good way.

In the previous THE WELLBORN CONSPIRACY book, Sporeville, Elliott Graven made a powerful enemy in the dastardly Professor Strange. As Knights of the Sea begins, he survives a murder attempt by one of Strange's henchmen. He then arrives for a visit with his lycanthropic sweetheart, Paisley, hoping for a peaceful and idyllic summer to take his mind off mortal danger for a while. Instead, he finds that Paisley is smitten by a dashing German submarine builder and that yet another deadly plot is in the works.

Knights of the Sea begins with a brief summary of Sporeville, which serves two purposes: it's funny, and it infodumps-without-infodumping, bringing readers up to speed on previous events without interrupting the story proper to do so. This is followed by a Dramatis Personae. This too is humorous, and provides a handy reference when the large cast becomes a little unwieldy to hold in one's brain.

The drily hilarious tone continues throughout the novel. As an example, in the following passage Elliott is trying to decide how to introduce himself to a new acquaintance:

""Mrs Anna Leonowens. I am organizing the new Victoria School of Arts."

Too late, Elliott realized he would be expected to introduce himself, now. His mind went blank. In its dark, aching recesses, only ridiculous false names appeared. Nemo Jimmerson. No. Montagu.... Van Buren. No, that would be as bad as using his real name. Desperately, he smiled and scanned the Chronicle. The smile seemed to worry Mrs Leonowens.

His eye alighted on `William Fielding.' That sounded like a real name. Of course, it probably was. It was in the paper. Wait. No. Impersonating the premier might only make matters worse. Especially as Fielding wasn't very popular at the moment, having failed to fulfil his election promise of seceding from the country."

Paul Marlowe's style of humor is reminiscent of Neil Gaiman's lighter works. When Elliott finds himself getting inadvertently drunk, it's easy to imagine that Benjamin Lassiter is sitting a few barstools down, ordering a ploughman's, and that in that corner over there, Crowley would be taunting Aziraphale with the dearth of good movies in Heaven, had movies been more fully invented at the time.

If you enjoy dry wit, Victoriana/steampunk elements, and plucky teenagers saving the world, you'll probably like Knights of the Sea. It's an tale of high adventure that takes a humorous look at... well, pretty much everything, from politics to romance to lycanthropy. Give it a shot if you liked Stardust (Paperback) or Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback