Kushiel's Dart (Kushiel's Legacy) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 9.49
  • List Price: CDN$ 9.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 0.50 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Kushiel's Dart Mass Market Paperback – Mar 15 2002


See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 9.49
CDN$ 4.01 CDN$ 0.01

2014 Books Gift Guide
Thug Kitchen, adapted from the wildly popular web site beloved by Gwyneth Paltrow ("This might be my favorite thing ever"), is featured in our 2014 Books Gift Guide. More gift ideas

Frequently Bought Together

Kushiel's Dart + Kushiel's Chosen + Kushiel's Avatar
Price For All Three: CDN$ 29.33


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 928 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Fantasy (March 15 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765342987
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765342980
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 3.6 x 17.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 386 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (207 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #7,451 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

HThis brilliant and daring debut, set in a skewed Renaissance world (people worship Jesus-like "Blessed Elua" but also demigods), catapults Carey immediately into the top rank of fantasy novelists. In the character of PhŠdre n¢ Delaunay, "a whore's unwanted get" sold into indentured servitude in opulent Night Court, the author has created a particularly strong and memorable female lead, and has surrounded her with a large and varied cast, from nobles and priests to soldiers and peasants. An engrossing plot focuses first on court intrigue and treachery, then, in a surprising shift, on high adventure, travel in barbarian lands including Alba (England) and war. Two demigods rule PhŠdre: Naamah, for sensual love; and Kushiel, for sado-masochistic pain, his "dart" being a blood spot in PhŠdre's eye. Not everyone will go for PhŠdre's graphic if elegantly described sexual encounters, which usually involve the infliction of pain, whether from lashing, branding or even cutting. PhŠdre, however, is no clich‚d sexpot but a complex character motivated by religious zeal. In one amusing scene, a group of sailors on the march chants: "Whip us till we're on the floor, we'll turn around and ask for more, we're PhŠdre's Boys!" At the end, the heroine reminds one of an equally strong-minded sister whose home was Tara. No mere feminist novel, this is an assured and magnificent book that will appeal to both male and female readers. (June 4)Forecast: With blurbs from Delia Sherman and Storm Constantine, plus major print advertising both genre and mainstream, this first novel could rack up impressive sales.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Trained from childhood to a life of servitude and espionage, Ph?dre n? Delaunay serves her master, Anafiel, as a courtesan and spy, ferreting out the dangerous secrets of the noble houses of Terre d'Ange. When she uncovers a treasonous conspiracy, however, her life takes on a new and deadly purpose. Set in a world reminiscent of late medieval and early Renaissance Europe, Carey's first novel portrays a society based upon political and sexual intrigue. The author's sensual prose, suitable for adult readers, should appeal to fans of Tanith Lee, Storm Constantine, and Terry Goodkind. Recommended for adult fantasy collections.
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Lest anyone should suppose that I am a cuckoo's child, got on the wrong side of the blanket by lusty peasant stock and sold into indenture in a shortfallen season, I may say that I am House-born and reared in the Night Court proper, for all the good it did me. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Nancy E. on June 2 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I have read many novels where the main character has been god touched, and uses his or her skills as an emissary of the gods to help save the lives of others but never in this way. Kushiel's Dart a novel by fantasy newcomer Jacquline Carey is a unique story. I can seriously say I have never seen anything quite like it before. It tells the story of, Phedre, a girl born with an ill luck name and a scarlet mote in her left eye. Considered to be cursed, she is sold in indentured servitude into the Night Court where she hopes one day to become a servant of Naamah, the goddess of sexual pleasure. Her life is changed forever when she is taken in by Anafiel no Delauny, a courtesan and spy. He sees her for what she really is, an anguissette, a child touched by the God of punishment Kusheil. This means that she is forced forever to feel pleasure and pain as one. As she begins to train for Naamah's service it is Delauny who teaches her the skills she will need to know to survive. He teachers her languages, history, and how to listen and pay attention in a world of dangerous politics.
There are so many good things to be said about this novel and I cannot possibly list them all here. One of the most attractive things about this book, in my opinion, is the elegant prose it is written in. Certainly not for everyone, Ms. Carey writes in a very descriptive manner filled with beautiful picture of the D'Angeline world. Although some would consider this to be too drawn out and lengthy is fits the character, a strong woman who is taught to listen and pay attention to every detail, perfectly. Another strong point would have to be the instantly likeable characters. Phedre for all of her strengths is a wonderfully flawed character.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nathalie Wigmore on Feb. 9 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book blew me out of the water. It is well written, full of rich imagery and description that often borders on the poetic. The plotline is simple, as all good plotlines are, but it is butressed by a complex web of intrigues and mysteries that can't help but keep the reader in suspense, needing to read just one more chapter before turning the lights out. The story is populated by a great number of characters, and where Carey shines here is in breathing life into each one, making them really come alive. The heroine is a solid, believable character, full of depth, bravery and flaws.

A word of caution, as has been mentioned: this book contains some S&M scenes that may be faintly disturbing to some readers. Not because the scenes are long and overly-described, but simply because they are there and they explore an aspect of sexuality that exists in reality and that makes a lot of people squeamish. Not everyone enjoys sado-masochism, and Carey has carried this into the world of Terre d'Ange. The S&M aspect of the heroine's sexuality is not the main drive behind the plot, but it does move the plot forward, in ways unexpected and that make sense in light of her personality.

"Kushiel's Dart" is written in the first-person narrative. I'm usually not a fan of this writing style because it limits the storytelling to the point of view of the main character. But I have to tip my hat at Carey and how she managed to draw me in almost in spite of myself. I actually put the book down after the first couple of lines, thinking, "Ugh, not in the first-person!" But then I picked it up again and decided to force myself to read the first chapter. I was hooked after the first five pages and finished off the 900-page paperback in four days.

Needless to say, I'll be reading the next installment.
A superb book. Highly, highly recommend.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Teri I. Riggins on Sept. 13 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Ignore the previous review of one star this is one of the best books you will ever read! The first chapter does go a bit slow but it lays the groundwork for the novel introducing characters and helping you learn the world of D'Angelines which is not much like ours. After that it is such a fascinating read Phedre is the heroine of all heroines. Carey's writing does have a lot of prose and explanation but it is beautifully written and it takes you from reading a book to being immersed in an alternate world. I will take Carey's trillon dollar words over fifty cent ones anyday. And her writing is as mature as it gets! She is the writer of all writers and my idol. Definately a must must read!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This ambitious novel blends the erotic and sadomasochistic with a tale of political intrigue and for the most part handles all three well. Carey's imaginary world is well thought out and amazingly complex, filled with intricately described plots and settings, a feature common to many fantasy novels published today. The religion of Elua, who preaches "love as thou wilt," provides an interesting view of sexual morality that makes Phèdre's occupation as a courtesan seem a natural part of her world.
Courtesan here, of course, is another word for sex slave, which despite all the rationalizations provided, Phèdre quite clearly is for most of the book, whether in the cultured world of Terre d'Ange or as a captive in the hands of her enemies. That she enjoys pain is an interesting idea that brings to mind Anne Rice's "Beauty" Trilogy or Pauline Reage's "The Story of O." As a feature of Phèdre's character this would be interesting to explore further, but it is decidedly a secondary feature of the plot.
There are two reasons this book rates four stars rather than five. First, it is so complex that the political machinations are nearly impossible to follow; Carey's skill as a writer makes it an enjoyable read nonetheless, but to be honest I was lost as to who was who and what they were doing almost from the beginning. A second and more serious flaw is the book's length. At 901 pages it tries too hard to do too much, and the ending, by the time you get there, is so long and drawn out that it becomes anticlimactic. I was left wondering if this wasn't a marketing ploy, with the idea that people would be more likely to buy a thick fantasy novel than a thin one.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback