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LOLITA Paperback – 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: PENGUIN (2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141182539
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141182537
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.5 x 19.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 259 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (384 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #582,664 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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First Sentence
Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. Read the first page
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4.5 out of 5 stars

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By H. F. Corbin on Sept. 29 2003
Format: Hardcover
"Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta." With those famous opening lines, Nabokov begins a sordid tale told by Humbert Humbert, one of the most fascinating characters in all of American literature. Even many people who have never read this novel know the basic story here since the word "Lolita" has become a part of American culture in that that someone with a "Lolita complex" is attracted to very young girls.
Published in 1955, this novel caused a storm of controversy; it is still provocative today even though there is not a four letter word in it. That is not to say that the book is not extremely erotic in many places. What Nabokov does with words is brilliant. As always he plays constant word games with the reader. Someone goes on a "honeymonsoon" to India. In seaching for Dolores aka Lolita and her run-away suitor, Humbert finds the name "Will Brown, Dolores, Colo." in a hotel register. Humbert and Dolores have breakfast in the "township of Soda, pop. 1001." There are allusions to Poe ("in a kingdom by the sea") and other writers throughout the book. You skim paragraphs at your peril.
The book is wondrously satiric. Nabokov captures the vapidness of the motels in small and middle America in the 40's and 50's with great brilliance. Humbert, with all his perversions, is often a terribly funny character as well. The scene where he wrestles with Quilty comes to mind. "We rolled all over the floor, in each other's arms, like two huge helpless children. He was naked and goatish under his robe, and I felt suffocated as he rolled over me. I rolled over him. We rolled over me. They rolled over him. We rolled over us.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Kerri on June 13 2004
Format: Paperback
This is unarguably a one-of-a-kind book. It's a difficult read, the language and prose is gorgeous, but can get a bit mundane. In a sense, it is a love story...but Humbert does not actually love Lolita herself, but he loves her for the fact that she resembles his lost childhood love. He never gets to know the REAL inside Lolita, he constantly talks about her nubile and pubescent beauty. He speaks of how she tortures him, but she is just a young girl. Humbert morally corrupts the girl to the point where she sleeps with other men and becomes involved with child pornography. This is the kind of book that weeks after finishing it, you continue to cotemplate it. What makes it readable, despite the distrubing concept, is that Nabavok adds humor, but all of the humor is dark and eerie.
It is a wonderful book, but it's definatly not meant to be read by everyone
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on Feb. 17 2004
Format: Paperback
Nabokov: the master of whatever.
I feel a bit like a sham writing a review for this, but 360 other readers can't be wrong, right? True, there is not much that I can add to the substantial literature available on Lolita, or the volumes of Vladdy in general. But I can say a few things about what I liked about the book, sprinkled here and there with some minor criticisms, mostly based on personal biases.
First, Nabokov is as much a master of the English language as anyone before or after, as far as I can tell. Lolita could be read at many different speeds. You could speed-read it, I suppose, if you have cultivated that ability, but you would only get the outline of the story, which is a good one, to be sure, but you'd miss some of the finer details - the nuances of word play (there must be fifty examples of themes based on the words "Dolores" and "Haze" - I became a bit obsessive-compulsive after finishing the book - no doubt because of the contagious neuroses of Humbert Humbert - and spent twenty minutes trying to decide if Nabokov, in the afterward (in my edition, there is a six or seven page note written by V.N. a year or two after publication), was teasing the reader with the use of the word "daze" - a final amalgamation of an ongoing thread?); references to Joyce, (thanks Adan) among others; allusions to cultural confrontations, including the confused traditionalism of Europe having to reconcile itself with the nothingness/everythingness of America; and examples of self-reflexivity that would make Brecht blush. You could spend a year reading this book (another type of Joycian reference - or homage, perhaps), analyzing it sentence by sentence, seeing if there is something within the microcosm of the page that reflects the universe of the book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By H. Saenz on July 31 2003
Format: Paperback
When I was recommended this book, I was intimidated by the " erotic, incestual theme" ( I have a great dislike and annoyance of raunchiness. Everyone thinks something is wrong because I never laughed watching American Pie and during Junior High sex- ed) and almost didn't bother picking it up. For the past few months, I read nothing but Kurt Vonnegut and was begining to think this would be a bore. However despite the bad reviews, I loved the book. Many people complain over it's " vulgar, disturbing" content but Nabokov never did really say on account what he did with Lolita. He was very metaphoric with his descriptions of the characters created; in my opinion, I think he intended on not telling what Humbert did because he knew that the reader will imagine will most likely be worst than what actually really did occur.

I must warn readers who are planning on reading Lolita: have patience ( It takes time before he mentions the plot and the first 80 something pages are talking about his past life in Europe. ), keep a dictionary handy if you are vocabulary challenged, and don't be so held up with the theme.
In shorter terms, I love the book. I, at first, would have gaven it three stars but I just kept coming back to it more intrigued every time I read it. By the way, I don't think anyone really mentioned this but it's a funny book when you think about. There were many times, I was laughing out loud in my study hall class because of Humbert's annoyance but devout love for Lolita.
Heather ( Grade 9)
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