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Lady Killer Mass Market Paperback – Jan 1 1981


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Mass Market Paperback, Jan 1 1981
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Gifts For Dad




Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 1 pages
  • Publisher: Signet (MM); Reissue edition (Jan. 1 1981)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451150821
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451150820
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 1.2 x 17.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 113 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,531,460 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'Delivers the goods: dialogue that breathes, characters with heart and characters who eat those hearts, and glints of unforgiving humour... McBain owns his turf' NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Ed McBain's real name is Evan Hunter and he has written best-selling books under this name. McBain has won numerous awards including the CWA's prestigious Diamond Dagger Award and the Mystery Writers of America Grand Master Award. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

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Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Lady Killer" was written early in the history of the 87th Precinct series, during a nine-day period in the summer of 1957 while vacationing in Martha's Vineyard. As he wrote in a funny introduction to the Armchair Detective Library edition, he wanted to get it done before some house guests arrived, and almost managed to do so.
It's an unusual 87th entry for several reasons. Those expecting lots of violence and profanity will be surprised by how tame this reads compared to later editions. It's the only 87th novel I've read where Steve Carella was not the main investigator, as Cotton Hawes, a background character in other volumes, strides to the fore. Most notably, there is a very compressed time frame in this book, just over 12 hours from the time a mysterious boy hands a note to the 87th's desk sergeant that states someone's plans to kill "The Lady" to when the note says the killing will take place.
I have a hard time believing that the Isola crime lab would or could respond so quickly to what seems a likely crank note, developing prints and precisely identifying paste and paper. Also, the resolution was unsatisfactory. The would-be killer, who we get shadowy glimpses of before the full reveal, seems to be one type of person before we find out he's another. Maybe Ed just didn't like keeping his guests waiting, but a couple more days would have helped make for a better resolution.
But the pace of this book is great. It has a real kind of moment-by-moment vibrancy with assorted diverting detours like the hunt for the mysterious kid and various leads on who "The Lady" might be. While reading it, you don't want to do much of anything else. Food and bathroom breaks seem unwarranted intrusions.
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By A Customer on May 6 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book kept me very much in suspense. I enjoyed it very much. I just couldn't put it down. I could not figure it out for anything
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By brenda crann on Jan. 19 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
goes on and on gets boring
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 32 reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Unusual McBain Has Strong Pace, Weak Punch April 13 2004
By Slokes - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Lady Killer" was written early in the history of the 87th Precinct series, during a nine-day period in the summer of 1957 while vacationing in Martha's Vineyard. As he wrote in a funny introduction to the Armchair Detective Library edition, he wanted to get it done before some house guests arrived, and almost managed to do so.

It's an unusual 87th entry for several reasons. Those expecting lots of violence and profanity will be surprised by how tame this reads compared to later editions.

It's the only 87th novel I've read where Steve Carella was not the main investigator, as Cotton Hawes, a background character in other volumes, strides to the fore. Most notably, there is a very compressed time frame in this book, just over 12 hours from the time a mysterious boy hands a note to the 87th's desk sergeant that states someone's plans to kill "The Lady" to when the note says the killing will take place.

I have a hard time believing that the Isola crime lab would or could respond so quickly to what seems a likely crank note, developing prints and precisely identifying paste and paper. Also, the resolution was unsatisfactory. The would-be killer, who we get shadowy glimpses of before the full reveal, seems to be one type of person before we find out he's another. Maybe Ed just didn't like keeping his guests waiting, but a couple more days would have helped make for a better resolution.

But the pace of this book is great. It has a real kind of moment-by-moment vibrancy with assorted diverting detours like the hunt for the mysterious kid and various leads on who "The Lady" might be. While reading it, you don't want to do much of anything else. Food and bathroom breaks seem unwarranted intrusions. Maybe it's because the book is such a tight read, at well under 200 pages, but it feels like a really good episode of "Law And Order" or "24," though you'd have to call it "12" instead.

Add to that McBain's wicked sense of humor, his canny ear for dialogue, and his brilliance in observed detail, and you have a recipe for a terrific crime fiction read. Too bad he didn't finish what he started, but maybe you will find the ending more satisfying than I did.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
LADY KILLER IS A KILLER BOOK!!!!!! March 9 2002
By Mac Blair - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I don't know any one but McBain that could hold my attention in a book that last for only a one day period of time. He is so good. The 87th Precinct gets a note one morning saying The Lady will be killed that night at 8:00. What lady???? Who could the killer be and why? There are millions of people in the City, is it possible to find The Lady and the killer before the deadline? The usual bunch try their best, Bert Kling, Steve Carella, Cotton Hawes, Myer Myer and Hal Willis give it all they have. It is a very good book on the way good police procedure will win out. The book will hold your attention, you can feel like you are part of the action going on, you can see in your mind the sweat and concern as the dead line draws closer. It is not about blood, guts and gore but will be a very good fast mystery read for you. I am trying to read these in order, hard to find some of them but think it is worth the try.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Early, brilliant effort from the 87th Precinct Jan. 9 2009
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Ed McBain's long-running series of mystery novels spanned fifty years and over fifty books. Based in the fictional city of Isola (with its eerie similarities to New York), McBain's conscientious cops spent thousands of pages chasing down every sort of villainous behaviour. From 1956 to 2005, readers were introduced to serial killers, money laundering, granny dumping and more.

One of the early ones, Lady Killer focuses entirely on Detectives Carella and Hawes. The two detectives receive a note that 'The Lady' will be killed tonight. With a city full of ladies to choose from, there's a lot of floundering about to be done. The book is a bit more procedural than most - the detectives tap their informants, brush up on fingerprinting, mull over some criminal psychology and even use a sketch artist.

As a side effect, there's actually very little chance for the reader to solve the mystery themselves - instead, we're just along for the ride. There's also some entertaining nods to 1950's sensibilities involved. Hawes hits on everything in a skirt (or, more daringly, those ladies in pants). A good one.
The Detectives of the 87th Precinct (and Their Creator) Work Under Pressure April 15 2013
By James L. Thane - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
First published in 1958, this is the eighth entry in Ed McBain's 87th Precinct series. By this point, the main characters were fairly well-established and needed no introduction, but the book itself is something of an oddity in the series in that most of the books have the detectives of the 87th working at least a couple of cases. This book focuses on a single case, worked by all of the detectives over a the course of a long and frustrating twelve-hour day.

As the team assembles in the morning, a young boy delivers a printed message to the desk sergeant. The man who wrote the message announces that he is going to kill "the Lady" at 8:00 that evening. The detectives have no idea if this is a practical joke or not, but naturally, they have to take the threat seriously.

In a desperate race against time the detectives work along parallel tracks, trying to determine the identity of the victim and that of the man who intends to kill her. As always, McBain provides an interesting and entertaining ride, although this would not rank among the better books in the series.

In a new introduction, McBain explains that he wrote the book under a deadline, in just nine days. His contract provided that he had to produce a manuscript of 180 pages--no more, no less--and that is exactly what he did. In order to do so, though, he added a lot of filler to what otherwise could have been a fairly short novella. There are a lot of extended descriptions of the weather and of various characters where McBain is obviously just attempting to fill space in an effort to hit his 180-page target and to get the book done as quickly as possible.

In less capable hands, this schedule would have almost certainly produced a book that would hardly be worth reading. But McBain is so good that even a book written under this kind of pressure turns out to be very entertaining and demonstrates what a talented and prolific writer could do "back in the day" when pulp novelists regularly produced several books a year. I wouldn't recommend that someone new to the series start with this book, but fans of the series will want to seek it out.
if you enjoy the earlier books in the series or want to ... July 14 2014
By avid reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
if you enjoy the earlier books in the series or want to see how some of the characters developed, this is highly recommended. the 6th or 7th book of the series, I think, Fast paced, and once you start you will see why. Cotton Hawes is featured more than in some other books and you get to see some of his earlier work in the precinct. McBain in his earlier work in the precinct but as good as always and a preview of the city in its earlier stages. Cant go wrong, not a long book but most of the early ones aren't but worth a trip to the ciy


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