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Last Exit to Brooklyn [Blu-ray] [Import]


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Product Details

  • Format: DTS Surround Sound, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Summit Inc/Lionsgate
  • Release Date: Oct. 10 2011
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0059GVB5I

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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By nina on Dec 15 2003
Format: VHS Tape
This is not a film for uptight people who can't see the form of art beyond this film's less-than-subtle depliction with sex, drugs and violence. This film deals with a box of subjects ( drag queens, gays, prostitution and gang rape ) that makes the " decent " of society run the other way. It's one film I suggest people over seventeen see at least once. The director's woven the novelist's tale into an unforgettable book flattery. This is one of the best film adaptations of a book I've ever witnessed. The actors will leave you breathless. The film doesn't present one dull moment. The movie is full of intense emotion and reality. Take it like it is if you can handle it.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Rocco Dormarunno on April 22 2004
Format: VHS Tape
It's the 1950s. Under President Eisenhower's administration, everyone has a house in the suburbs, a decent job, a gas-guzzling car, and a basic "Leave It to Beaver" lifestyle.
Not so, said Hubert Selby, in his novel, LAST EXIT TO BROOKLYN. For a good deal of the working class, times were still tough. Preyed upon by crime, toyed with by factory owners and unions, and, ultimately, shackled by their own ignorance, the working class had their promise of a white picket fence and primrose garden vacated. In Brooklyn, particularly, things were acutely tough. Manufacturing jobs were on a rapid decline, as companies moved out of town or out of state (which was why those companies remaining in Brooklyn were able to mess with their employees: take it or leave it, was their attitude). At the same time, an influx of immigrants seeking jobs made the hunt for work even more competitive--another bonus for the remaining factory owners. Slums rapidly worsened, so much so that Dodger owner Walter Alston decided his team's future was in jeopardy. L.A. looked like a much safer place for a stadium.
But neither Selby nor director Uli Edel portrayed this working class as merely innocent victims. Neither the book nor the film is a didactic rant about class warfare. The poor had their own vices of greed, brutality, and dissipation. Just about every other scene has someone going through someone else's wallets, union funds or pockets. If they aren't doing that, they're drinking, fighting, or whoring. It's a pretty dismal world. The natural response to this film might be: "Wait a minute. Not everyone working class Johnny-Punchclock guy was a criminal. Most people worked hard and honestly." Of course, this is true but it's not the film's concern.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Jan. 5 2004
Format: VHS Tape
Last Exit to Brooklyn tells a story the way it needs to be told...realistically. This film is not for everyone. If you can't accept the fact that some people do behave like this than this film is not for you. Everyone doesn't live in a fantasy land and Last Exit to Brooklyn shows this. People brought up in conditions like these or who are familiar with people such as this can vouch that people are truly like this in some places. It may not be an excuse for how others act but it is real and this film proves that. This is a powerful, moving film not to be looked upon if you're easily offended out of your own ignorance and live in a rose-colored world. If you have the ability to watch a movie, understand it and be taken in with what the film represents ( without feeling threatened ) then this movie is a keeper. If you can't see that Last Exit to Brooklyn deplicts reality for people other than the super fortunate, rent Sweet Home Alabama because this movie is not for you.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jennykching on Dec 27 2003
Format: VHS Tape
People who think that the working class or anyone who is down and out is necessarily brutal and self-serving will love this film. For those who like their "social realism" as ugly and unambiguous as possible,this is the film for you. Most of the characters are one-dimensional,yell their lines and are either outrightly cruel/unfeeling (practically everyone) or hystrionic/narcissistic victims doomed to be wiped out by the end of the film (eg Gorgette the transvestite, Tra La La the town "tramp"). Almost all are totally unsympathetic--practically no-one in this film is worth caring about. Sorry, but real life is NOT like this,not even amongst the "downtrodden" who obviously make such sensationalist fodder for those eager to "slum it" vicariously for a couple of hours. This film might titilate nihilistic 20 yr olds or middle class suburbanites and has clearly thrilled all the critics (and almost everyone else in this forum) but I found it stupid and ugly (and boring). Jennifer Jason Leigh is terrific, I must add. That is the only good thing I can say about this film, I'm afraid. For those looking for uncompromising social realism and characters written with compassion rather than contempt, try reading Steinback's "Cannery Row" or see the movie of his novel "Of Mice and Men" or, for a more contemporary, very bleak but infinitly better film than Last Exit see "Nil by Mouth" directed by Gary Oldman.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 54 reviews
44 of 49 people found the following review helpful
Why the Dodgers left Brooklyn April 22 2004
By Rocco Dormarunno - Published on Amazon.com
Format: VHS Tape
It's the 1950s. Under President Eisenhower's administration, everyone has a house in the suburbs, a decent job, a gas-guzzling car, and a basic "Leave It to Beaver" lifestyle.
Not so, said Hubert Selby, in his novel, LAST EXIT TO BROOKLYN. For a good deal of the working class, times were still tough. Preyed upon by crime, toyed with by factory owners and unions, and, ultimately, shackled by their own ignorance, the working class had their promise of a white picket fence and primrose garden vacated. In Brooklyn, particularly, things were acutely tough. Manufacturing jobs were on a rapid decline, as companies moved out of town or out of state (which was why those companies remaining in Brooklyn were able to mess with their employees: take it or leave it, was their attitude). At the same time, an influx of immigrants seeking jobs made the hunt for work even more competitive--another bonus for the remaining factory owners. Slums rapidly worsened, so much so that Dodger owner Walter Alston decided his team's future was in jeopardy. L.A. looked like a much safer place for a stadium.
But neither Selby nor director Uli Edel portrayed this working class as merely innocent victims. Neither the book nor the film is a didactic rant about class warfare. The poor had their own vices of greed, brutality, and dissipation. Just about every other scene has someone going through someone else's wallets, union funds or pockets. If they aren't doing that, they're drinking, fighting, or whoring. It's a pretty dismal world. The natural response to this film might be: "Wait a minute. Not everyone working class Johnny-Punchclock guy was a criminal. Most people worked hard and honestly." Of course, this is true but it's not the film's concern. This is a study of those who were trapped in that world, and this study is compelling and horrifying.
Uli Edel has perfectly captured this bleak world, either bathing everything in a garish light or obscuring it in heavy shadows. The performances are brilliant. There's no understating Jennifer Jason Leigh's gritty and powerful performance. Also keep an eye out for a cameo by Hubert Selby as the driver who hits Georgette. Not for the weak-stomached and definitely not for kids, LAST EXIT TO BROOKLYN is as cinematographically close to the innermost circle of urban hell as you can get.
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
Amazingly good but very disturbing movie. June 11 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
This movie is based on Herbert Selby's cult novel from the early 1960s. The novel traces the lives of some rough urban characters (prostitutes, street hoodlums, transvestites, striking dock workers) in 1950s Brooklyn. Think of this as "On the Waterfront" without the sugar coating. A friend of mine hates the movie because he feels it is nightmarish and lacks a moral center. I like the movie for just this reason, as deep down I think life is that way. The movie is a harsh and uncompromising look at people whose dreams don't work out; in fact, the dreams often explode in the characters' faces. Jennifer Jason Leigh, Stephen Lang, Stephen Baldwin, Jerry Orbach and Alexis Arquette are fantastic. Don't watch this with kids or with people with delicate sensibilities---it's violent, sexually graphic, and full of verbal abuse and foul language.
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
A Hell of a Film Jan. 5 2004
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: VHS Tape
Last Exit to Brooklyn tells a story the way it needs to be told...realistically. This film is not for everyone. If you can't accept the fact that some people do behave like this than this film is not for you. Everyone doesn't live in a fantasy land and Last Exit to Brooklyn shows this. People brought up in conditions like these or who are familiar with people such as this can vouch that people are truly like this in some places. It may not be an excuse for how others act but it is real and this film proves that. This is a powerful, moving film not to be looked upon if you're easily offended out of your own ignorance and live in a rose-colored world. If you have the ability to watch a movie, understand it and be taken in with what the film represents ( without feeling threatened ) then this movie is a keeper. If you can't see that Last Exit to Brooklyn deplicts reality for people other than the super fortunate, rent Sweet Home Alabama because this movie is not for you.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Well made, but probably more enjoyable for Selby fans Oct. 8 2004
By kevin yee - Published on Amazon.com
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
Over the summer I purchased and read Hubert Selby Jr.'s "Last Exit to Brooklyn". It was the first book I had read for pleasure since high school. I also only bought it because the film Requiem for a Dream was astonishing, and because it wasnt at that particular bookstore. Anywho, I read LETB in about a week, which is super fast for me, and was intrigued enough to go out and watch the film.

I had never heard of Uli Edel but was curious to see how well the book was illustrated through film. From the opening shot of the three military men walking through the dark streets to the Greeks to the factory to the strike office, things seemed to have been pulled straight from the book. If you have read the book you know how it can be sometimes quite difficult to read Selby's writing style, considering there are pages upon pages of text in all caps and run-on sentences up the wazoo, so a visual illustration really did a good job of bringing some confusing parts of the book to life.

Jennifer Jason Leigh gave a good performance as the infamous Tralala, Jerry Orbach was always refreshing to watch, but I think I liked the portrayal of Harry Black the best (I think it was Stephen Lang). As in the book, his "chapter", along with Tralala's, were the longest, and the two characters were also the most intertwined in the other stories, so they also got a majority of the screen time in the film. Oh, and Burt Young was well cast, too. He seems to thrive on the grumpy-caring-jerk-semi womanizer type character quite well.

I know others who have read the book or seen the movie have been put off by its unflattering portrait of the Brooklyn working class 60 years ago. Im only 22, and not the biggest history buff, so because of my little knowledge of the time I really cant form an opinion of how well it interprets the people and the places, or if much of it was dramatized, or if the stories told just represented a handful of the population in Brooklyn. But regradless, I enjoyed the less than perfect lifestyle and the struggles and sacrifices our characters endured to achieve their goals. I live near an upper middle class area, so lots of people take things for granted, and I think thats why Im drawn to these types of books and films.

But anyway, I liked this film; and I liked the book, too. Its not one of those films (or books) that you can watch or read everyday because the content strikes like a hammer and stays with you long after, kind of like Requiem, but I feel I am a better person for experiencing "Last Exit to Brooklyn".
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Raw Look at the 1950s June 8 2007
By Martin Shackelford - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This is a frank filming of the Hubert Selby novel about the brutality of street life in Brooklyn 1952. If you like "happy" films, this isn't for you. But if you appreciate a good dose of realism, the film is remarkable.

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