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Le Morte Darthur, V1 [Hardcover]

Thomas Malory
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Book Description

July 2002
Edited and first published by William Caxton in 1485, Sir Thomas Malory's unique and splendid version of the Arthurian legend tells an immortal story of love, adventure, chivalry, treachery, and death. This edition includes an excellent introduction by John Lawlor.
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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About the Author

No one knows for sure who the author of Le Morte D'Arthur was, but the generally accepted theory is that of American scholar G.L. Kitteredge, who argued it was Sir Thomas Malory, born in the first quarter of the fifteenth century, and who spent the greatest part of his last twenty years in prison. Another possibility is a Thomas Malory of Studley and Hutton in Yorkshire, or an author living north of Warwickshire. It is generally accepted that the author was a member of the gentry and a Lancastrain. John Lawlor was Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Keele. He is the author of The Tragic Sense in Shakespeare, Piers Plowman: An Essay in Criticism and Chaucer. Janet Cowen is a senior lecturer in English at King's College, University of London. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Then Ulfius was glad, and rode on more than a pace till that he came to King Uther Pendragon, and told him he had met with Merlin. Read the first page
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best version of this great masterpiece available July 14 1999
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I own well-over ten copies of Le Morte d'Arthur, and have read more than that number, and I can say with little doubt that the Penguin version is the very best available to anyone who wishes to read this classic. All Arthurian scholars should keep a copy of this two-volume set. I would also recommend this to anyone who has never read any of the Arthurian romances. This is the right starting place!
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2.0 out of 5 stars The legend of Arthur Feb. 24 1998
Format:Paperback
After reading this fine Penguin edition of 'The Death of Arthur', I understood why there was such a wealth of material for Monte Python to parody in their film 'The Holy Grail'. I found a lot of the action in Malory downright silly or stupid. To be fair, Malory did a superb job collating the various grail legends. As a modern publisher, Penguin has put together two nice volumes at a reasonable price. And yet, though the legends of Arthur and the holy grail do hold fascination for western Europe, to be candid, I found Le Morte d'Arthur a dull and unpleasureable reading experience. If you already love the legends or want to know more about them, buy the books. If not, there are plenty better things to read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful! Nov. 9 1998
Format:Paperback
It isn't satire and it isn't mindless superficial reading. It is a classic for a reason, it is beautifully written by Malory who put together the various ledgens floating around. Malory started it, and the flood of versions came afterward. It is exciting and adventurous, consentrating on heroism and honor and chilvary. This is my favorite version of the Arthurian ledgens (the original), along with John Steinbeck's easier reading of it, called The Acts of King Arthur and His Noble Knights. I reccomend it to any litterary folk!
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5.0 out of 5 stars The core writings of the Arthurian literature Jan. 10 1999
Format:Paperback
This is the one book I would recommend to anyone interested in the legend of Arthur and his noble knights. Sir Thomas Malory perfectly sums up the wide scope of the Arthurian times, with all the characters and their personalities coming alive with this brillant work. Also, this version under the editing of Janet Cowen possesses the most modern English, easily understandable, with no dictionaries required at your side.
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Amazon.com: 3.8 out of 5 stars  9 reviews
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic literature at its finest Dec 28 2004
By Scott Baret - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I typically am not a fan of classic literature. There are a few books, however, that I have really enjoyed. This is one of them.

As one would expect it's a high reading level. However, it's definitely worth it. Malory does an excellent job at telling the stories of King Arthur, and develops his characters very well.

I enjoy medieval-themed stories and I recommend this to anyone who likes this genre and has a high school education (for the high level of reading).
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ian Myles Slater on: In Quest of the "Best" Malory Aug. 20 2012
By Ian M. Slater - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
In case reviews of entirely different editions start to appear together (again), at Amazon software's whim: This is a review of the two-volume edition of Sir Thomas Malory's "Le Morte D'Arthur" published by Penguin Books, edited by Janet Cowan, with an Introduction by John Lawlor. Originally part of the Penguin English Library (1969), it was later (1986) included in the Penguin Classics, in both the older, smaller (mass-market) Penguin format and the current, somewhat larger format; they all appear to be identical in contents. It is now available in Kindle format, very reasonably priced. However, I will discuss other versions, notably the Modern Library, the Wordsworth Classics, and the old Everyman's Library editions.

The Penguin edition is based primarily on the 1485 text printed by William Caxton. It is modernized in spelling, but not in grammar. Each volume has a glossary of proper names, and another of archaic words; the most difficult words are generally noted and translated at the foot of the page on which they appear. A small section of notes in each volume deal with some confusing passages, and identify places where Caxton's text has been emended -- usually from the "Winchester Manuscript," now in the British Library, discovered in a safe at Winchester College in 1934, after being mistakenly catalogued under the title of a 1634 printed edition. The manuscript differs from Caxton's text in thousands of places, mostly minor, but some very important.

(Please Note: there is now another set of editions, based primarily on the longer Winchester text; unfortunately, modernizations of that version are either abridged, or, in my opinion, more or less open rewritings, or both, like Keith Baines' "rendition" -- not to mention John Steinbeck's unfinished "Acts of King Arthur ...," which is a retelling as a modern novel. Two complete old-spelling editions of this second, longer, version, are in paperback, the Oxford Standard Authors original-spelling edition, as "Malory: Complete Works," followed by a recent Norton Critical Edition, as "Le Morte D'Arthur," on somewhat different lines. I reviewed them together, under the "Complete Works" title, and more recently was able to post a review for the NCE, which used to be lumped in with other editions. Both are worthwhile, for readers willing and able to deal with them.)

Among the readily available editions of the Caxton "Morte," the Penguin edition is my favorite; a judicious balance of modern, or regularized, spellings, clarifying punctuation, and short explanations, without distortion of the not-yet-quite-Modern English of the sentences. Although Lawlor's introduction is beginning to show its age (Malory's French and English sources are treated as evidence in a then-current critical debate), Janet Cowan's text remains exceptionally attractive. The two-volume format is easy to handle, but can be a bit of a nuisance; if you want the whole story, be sure to order both! (It may be found to be more of a nuisance in digital form, where physical bulk isn't a problem, but navigation is.)

It was Caxton, the pioneer of English printing, who assigned the title "The Death of Arthur" to a work which begins with Arthur's conception and birth, for reasons which he rather laboriously explained in a final colophon. (For those of you who know enough French to see that the title should begin "La Mort" -- the spelling is, as elsewhere in the text, based on medieval *Norman* standards, and the Parisian certainty of Death's feminine gender did not dictate English scribal -- or printing-house -- practices in the fifteenth century.) Until the publication of the Winchester text in 1947, all editions of this famous late Middle English compilation of stories of King Arthur and his Knights had to be based, more or less (and often less) directly, on the 1485 printing by William Caxton, of which two copies have survived, one missing fifteen leaves.

Unhappily, most nineteenth-century printings (the first two both in 1816) were based on the very corrupt ("improved") 1634 Stansby printing, sometimes sporadically compared to the Caxton text, or were in some other way "corrected" for (mainly) Victorian readers. In 1817, the poet Robert Southey tried to rely on Caxton, but had to replace the missing pages in the copy he was using with those in one of the reprintings, in 1498 and 1528, by Caxton's apprentice and successor, the self-named Wynkyn "de Worde." (The first is the original "illustrated Malory," the second is the first intentionally "modernized" Malory, customers having apparently complained that a book written in the 1460s was sounding a bit old-fashioned.) In addition, Southey's publisher seems to have used Stansby as a printing-house copy, directly or through the competing reprintings of 1816. Uncertainty as to proper editorial principles, reflecting uncertainty as to Malory's literary worth, and concern over the "immoral" contents of a book thought likely to appeal to boys, continued through the nineteenth century. (And into our time, as well.)

The three-volume edition (with extensive apparatus) by H. Oskar Sommers of 1889-1891 finally used the surviving copies of the 1485 edition as the sole authority. I have not seen a reported reprinting of the full version The Sommers "Morte" text, without the introduction, notes, glossary, etc., is available in a hypertext format, and the Library of Congress site, archive.org, has reliable pdfs of all three volumes. It was presumably used by F.J. Simmons, who edited the ornate J.M. Dent edition of 1893-1894, illustrated by Aubrey Beardsley (reprinted a few years ago by Crown; Dover has issued an illustrations-only volume as well). Sommers' text was certainly used by Israel Gollancz for another Dent edition, the modernized four-volume Temple Classics version of 1897. This text appears to have been reset for a two-volume edition in 1906, in Dent's Everyman's Library series, with normalized (modern) spellings. There are some peculiarities in this version; for example, the spelling of names often changes between volumes one and two. For most purposes it was reliable enough, and was widely read during much of the twentieth century, appearing in the US in hardcover in Dutton reprints of the Everyman's Library, with a paperback edition in the 1970s. It seems to be out of print, but used copies show up regularly, and, some of the out-of-copyright Kindle and other digital editions may be based on it. Again, archive.org offers reliable pdf versions.

The Dent editions of the "Morte" had competition from other modernized texts, based on the Sommers edition, which included a revision by Sir Edward Strachey of his somewhat expurgated ("for boys") 1868 Globe edition for Macmillan. This version was replaced by a new Macmillan edition in 1903, edited by the distinguished bibliographer, and able editor of popular editions, A.W. Pollard. Pollard's text has been reprinted by a number of American publishers, and was at one time a Book Club offering, advertised as "unexpurgated" -- which it was, compared to some Victorian editions, and most especially to Sidney Lanier's "The Boy's King Arthur." The Pollard text is available on-line. It has been reprinted yet again, in the current Modern Library hardcover and paperback editions, with a fine new introduction, by Elizabeth J. Bryan, describing briefly the Arthurian Legend, and the problem of the two texts of the "Morte." The Pollard text also appears to underlie the Wordsworth Classics paperback, which has a helpful new Introduction, by Helen Cooper, and includes an index of characters (by Book and Chapter, not page number), but lacks notes. It is a relatively inexpensive, if not overwhelmingly attractive, alternative to the other editions. Once again, there are Kindle editions of Pollard's public-domain text, and pdfs at archive.org.

Although I prefer the Penguin edition if I want to read Caxton's text of Malory, the Everyman's Library and Pollard texts have deserved reputations as readable and reliable texts. Unfortunately, some of the digital editions are (as usual) badly in need of proofreading (ESPECIALLY in conjunction with the genuine archaic words and spellings), so some caution is advisable.

Since the appearance of the Penguin "Morte," there have been two major technical publications of the Caxton text: a facsimile, edited by Paul Needham (1976), and a critical edition, edited by James Spisak (1983). I am not aware of a popular edition which has taken advantage of these resources.
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best version of this great masterpiece available July 14 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I own well-over ten copies of Le Morte d'Arthur, and have read more than that number, and I can say with little doubt that the Penguin version is the very best available to anyone who wishes to read this classic. All Arthurian scholars should keep a copy of this two-volume set. I would also recommend this to anyone who has never read any of the Arthurian romances. This is the right starting place!
5.0 out of 5 stars Great edition of a great book. Oct. 11 2013
By Aungrl - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Along with the second edition, this book is the best translation of the original that I've uncovered. Highly recommend it.
1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Only As A Relic Nov. 11 2012
By E. Bianchi - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I am in my sixties now, and out of curiosity I have taken to reading some of the 'classics' -- books I have heard about and/or read/seen interpretations of all my life, but never sampled in their original form. I have now read 'The Epic of Gilgamesh', 'The Song of Roland', and am reading 'Le Morte d'Arthur'. I am about halfway through the first volume of Arthur.

I found Gilgamesh to be fascinating, not only because it is perhaps the oldest epic from human history, but because of its characters and its story line. Gilgamesh is a flawed character who evolves over the course of his adventures, and ultimately must accept failure in his final quest -- that of immortality. The defeated hero-king must come to terms with his human destiny. His ultimate victory is to achieve wisdom.

In many ways Gilgamesh is a comic-book superhero -- far larger than life -- only he received his superpowers from the gods, rather than from the bite of a radioactive spider. That the tale of the superhero spans four millennia is a significant reflection on what humanity finds both entertaining and inspirational.

Roland, a medieval epic, involves no personal growth worth talking about. It is a blood-and-guts swordfest recounting Charlemagne's fictional battles to drive the Saracens out of Spain. Christians and Muslims die by the tens of thousands while charging back and forth about the countryside. Roland dies early in the story, his most notable contribution being too proud to blow his horn for help until it is too late. Three thousand years of storytelling haven't improved the product. Gilgamesh remains the more interesting tale.

Now I am slogging through Le Morte d'Arthur, and frankly, I'd rather be in Philadelphia. To the medieval scholar it is probably a treasure. To a modern reader it is a confused and boring bit of fanboy lit. The motivations of the characters, from Arthur on down, are vain and pretentious. The deeds done in the pursuit of their 'high' ends are appalling. Women are ravished. Knights randomly clash in bloody, maiming and often deadly contests for the sheer joy of taking cuts at each other. Horses get killed as a mere opening gambit in these egregious battles. With all the knightly mayhem recounted here it would seem that to be in a knight in King Arthur's time was to have the life expectancy of a fighter pilot during the Battle of Britain.

The collection of stories in Le Mort appear to have been traditional tales collected by Mallory and edited into a 'Best Of' boxed set. If there ever had been any truth to the stories, it has been revised and distorted beyond recognition through the middle ages equivalent of a game of 'Telephone'. Veracity, however, is not a necessary ingredient in a good story. But these stories aren't good. They are amateurish and boring. The only value I see in them is as historical relics.

That, in itself, may be enough to keep me reading through to the end. I have finished worse books simply to finish what I have started. I have sympathy for the student who has this book as assigned reading. It may be enough to inspire them to take up a more practical education and profession.
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