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Le Poeme De L Extase/Pno Cto/P Import


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Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 25 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • ASIN: B00000JLEP
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

1. Le Poème de l'extase, op. 54
2. Concerto for Piano & Orchestra in F Sharp Minor, op 20: I - Allegro
3. Concerto for Piano & Orchestra in F Sharp Minor, op 20: II - Andante
4. Concerto for Piano & Orchestra in F Sharp Minor, op 20: III - Allegro moderato
5. Promethee, Le Poème du Feu, op. 60

Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
In the absence of the availability of the Ashkenazy recording of these same works on the London CD label (I am a "library listener" right now!), I finally had a chance to listen to and study these orchestral works by Alexander Scriabin. I found myself feeling impressed.
Many critics and detractors constantly point out the overly analytical aspect of Pierre Boulez's musical interpretations, a fact he himself admitted to. However, I think that his thoughtfulness, knowledge of orchestral sonorities, attention to detail and architecture, and striving for perfection make for crisp, warm, and full-bodied interpretations.
The "Poem of Ecstasy" is performed with clarity, attention to detail, and an air of mystery. Boulez's French background give this piece an overall sound and feeling that recalls his recording of "Daphnis et Chloe," by Maurice Ravel. The trumpet plays with excellent tone and clarity. The strings seem to balance well with the rest of the orchestra. Perhaps there is too much of a feeling of Ravel and Debussy in this piece, but I find the interpretation very convincing. The final orchestral climax is most impressive, indeed!
Next, I found myself enjoying the collaboration of Anatol Ugorski and Boulez in the Piano Concerto in F-sharp minor and the "Poem of Fire." Ugorski plays with beauty, sensitivity, and crystalline clarity. He is an accomplished virtuoso pianist. Ugorski's playing shows the strong connection with Scriabin and his reverence for the piano music of Frederic Chopin. The orchestra gives a performance full of precision and the attention to detail that never escapes Boulez.
The "Poem of Fire" is even more mysterious and evocative to me than the "Poem of Ecstasy.
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Format: Audio CD
I love this disc (which to be fair, has received very mixed comments). Boulez, with his typical focus on clarity, tackles this volcanic composer's overheated music with compelling results. It's not the only way to play Scriabin -- some may prefer a more overtly emotional thrust -- but it works.
The fabulous Chicago Symphony sounds thrilling, with the gleaming brass dominating but not overpowering the dense textures. I especially like this version of "Prometheus," which includes the choral part - here sung by the excellent Chicago Symphony Chorus.
Other versions may sound "more Russian" or be more passionate, but the approach here works on its own glittery, crystalline terms.
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By "mmecon" on Jan. 26 2000
Format: Audio CD
I own two recordings: the Ashkenazy and Ugorski. Both are good performances and I cannot say I prefer one to the other.
The Ugorski is a more brisk and technically brilliant performance. DG has produced a very nice sounding album, the quality of which certainly exceeds that of the Ashkenazy performance. The CSO has quite a reputation and I won't bother with further praise here.
Ashkenazy's somewhat slower tempi and more liberal rubatos yield a more romantic and less technically precise and rigid performance. The Ugorski, in some ways, lacks the strength of the former. Either performance is an excellent addition to one's collection.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 11 reviews
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
Another Wonderful Boulez Performance Aug. 6 2002
By Paul Rossi - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
In the absence of the availability of the Ashkenazy recording of these same works on the London CD label (I am a "library listener" right now!), I finally had a chance to listen to and study these orchestral works by Alexander Scriabin. I found myself feeling impressed.
Many critics and detractors constantly point out the overly analytical aspect of Pierre Boulez's musical interpretations, a fact he himself admitted to. However, I think that his thoughtfulness, knowledge of orchestral sonorities, attention to detail and architecture, and striving for perfection make for crisp, warm, and full-bodied interpretations.
The "Poem of Ecstasy" is performed with clarity, attention to detail, and an air of mystery. Boulez's French background give this piece an overall sound and feeling that recalls his recording of "Daphnis et Chloe," by Maurice Ravel. The trumpet plays with excellent tone and clarity. The strings seem to balance well with the rest of the orchestra. Perhaps there is too much of a feeling of Ravel and Debussy in this piece, but I find the interpretation very convincing. The final orchestral climax is most impressive, indeed!
Next, I found myself enjoying the collaboration of Anatol Ugorski and Boulez in the Piano Concerto in F-sharp minor and the "Poem of Fire." Ugorski plays with beauty, sensitivity, and crystalline clarity. He is an accomplished virtuoso pianist. Ugorski's playing shows the strong connection with Scriabin and his reverence for the piano music of Frederic Chopin. The orchestra gives a performance full of precision and the attention to detail that never escapes Boulez.
The "Poem of Fire" is even more mysterious and evocative to me than the "Poem of Ecstasy." One can hear the increase of fourth chords, augmented chords, whole tone scales, and tritone modulations that give Scriabin's sound world its unique sonorities. Once again, Ugorski gives a wonderfully detailed, evocative performance, and Boulez gives an outstanding accompaniment. The sound quality of this CD is absolutely outstanding!
Overall, I understand that the Ashkenazy recording of these works is the definitive performance and recording of them, but one cannot go far wrong with this CD. If you can overlook the "Frenchness" of this interpretation and don't mind thoughtful, analytical music-making, this CD is well worth your money and time investment.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Low voltage Scriabin. June 20 2005
By Plaza Marcelino - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Himself a phenomenal pianist, Scriabin arrived to the same twelve-note scale harbour as his austrian contemporary Schoenberg had but from an altogether different route, as he devised a "system" of "piling up" fourth-interval chords instead of going the Schoenberg way from melody itself. I'm not sure if the one was aware or not of the other's work but Schoenberg had followers that extended his work and methods whereas Scriabin had not. For the listener, Scriabin's works will sound far more "tonal" than the austrian's but if you study the scores closely you'll end up more or less in the same place although with the russian's apportation permeated with a strong emotional element that is generally absent from Schoenberg's techniques (but to which Berg would introduce most effectively a few decades later).

When I came across this CD I was puzzled, for I had the impression that Scriabin's language would prove as alien to Boulez as would be, say, Richard Strauss' (although I'd be quite interested in hearing what he could do with Salome or Elektra, especially with the latter), more so in the case of the early, chopinesque Piano Concerto. And in the end, my impressions were confirmed albeit with an unexpected twist. This is very well recorded and with top playing by Ugorski and the Chicago Orchestra, Scriabin, but in the end a low-voltage Scriabin. Boulez seems more interested in the two later works and sounds more convincing in the "Poem of Fire", than in the rest of the disc's programme, making this most intriguing of Scriabin's works sound even Webern-esque (and indeed one wonders where Scriabin would have arrived to had he lived longer).

For me Boulez is less effective in the piano-less "Poem of Ecstasy", with the Piano Concerto's results somewhere in between. The "Poem of Ecstasy" sounds uninvolved, distant and somewhat "hammered into" that really assimilated. The inner energy the composer welded into the score is rarely present and the powerful climax called for never really conforms to what is written down, an ecstasy that stalled midway so to speak. As I said, the concerto fares better and receives a handsome performance from Ugorski but in the end fails to convince wholly and makes you refer to other versions in your collection, better consubstantiated with its style and atmospehere.

A mixed bag, then, but an useful modern vehicle for three works from a composer that deserves far more diffusion.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Cool Boulez meets fiery Scriabin April 16 2002
By Bruce Hodges - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I love this disc (which to be fair, has received very mixed comments). Boulez, with his typical focus on clarity, tackles this volcanic composer's overheated music with compelling results. It's not the only way to play Scriabin -- some may prefer a more overtly emotional thrust -- but it works.
The fabulous Chicago Symphony sounds thrilling, with the gleaming brass dominating but not overpowering the dense textures. I especially like this version of "Prometheus," which includes the choral part - here sung by the excellent Chicago Symphony Chorus.
Other versions may sound "more Russian" or be more passionate, but the approach here works on its own glittery, crystalline terms.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Incredible music April 5 2009
By B. Kemper - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
To be honest, I probably needn't bother with writing this: anyone looking at recordings of Scriabin's music knows that he was a genius (a bit bizarre personally, but a genius). So just in case you need a bit of prompting here: this is amazing, deep music. Not a lot of hummable tunes, but if you are looking here, you probably aren't that interested in hummable tunes anyway. Whether you are a fan of Scriabin's or not, buy this and listen to it multiple times. It is beautiful, deep, dark, a bit twisted, and just plain amazing.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
The 2 stars are for the Chicago Symphony alone April 20 2013
By Jurgen Lawrenz - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Once you've heard Svetlanov conducting this piece, with nothing less than an absolutely volcanic passion, and then Gergiev's performance which doesn't lag far behind in terms of sheer voluptuousness, you are forever spoilt for the kind of "gentlemanly" music making as Boulez produces here. Heaven bless the Chicago Symphony, but hiring this metronome-besotted time beater was a huge mistake, explained only by a prestige that induces many people to shot their ears when they don't like what they hear - after all, this is the "great" Boulez! It does remind me, sorry to say, of the tale of the Emperor's clothes.
All the performances on this album are marked by a reticence and indeed tiredness which stands at the opposite end of an apposite approach. This is Scriabin, after all, a musical revolutionary, seeking to enlarge the expressive power of music by a new harmonic language and highly differentiated instrumental colours. With due allowances made for the fin de siecle temper that infested others as well (Busoni, Schoenberg, Mahler etc.), a good way of thinking of this music is of a creative mind seeking to burst open the thinning skin of traditional forms and harmony. In short, this music represents part of an adventure, a journey of discovery, and it wasn't driven by politeness, but by impulsiveness, impetuosity, impatience and a talent for the exotic and extraordinary.
Boulez, himself a radical in his youth, seems to have turned progressively into a fossil as he made increasing forays into the classical repertoire. Those who remember the excitement of his earlier years, when his Bartok, Ravel and Debussy were still revelatory, will groan with dismay at this colourless, uninvolved, stale exhibition of conductorial expertise. Even Ormandy, by no means at home in Scriabin, turned in a more apt performance for RCA. So now we have Poem of Ecstasy without ecstasy, a Poem of Fire without fire and a Piano Concerto that sounds for all the world like a youthful essay of Chopin.
I have my doubts that this is what the world needed.

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