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Lectures in Game Theory for Computer Scientists [Hardcover]

Krzysztof R. Apt , Erich Grädel

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Book Description

Feb. 14 2011 0521198666 978-0521198660
Games provide mathematical models for interaction. Numerous tasks in computer science can be formulated in game-theoretic terms. This fresh and intuitive way of thinking through complex issues reveals underlying algorithmic questions and clarifies the relationships between different domains. This collection of lectures, by specialists in the field, provides an excellent introduction to various aspects of game theory relevant for applications in computer science that concern program design, synthesis, verification, testing and design of multi-agent or distributed systems. Originally devised for a Spring School organised by the GAMES Networking Programme in 2009, these lectures have since been revised and expanded, and range from tutorials concerning fundamental notions and methods to more advanced presentations of current research topics. This volume is a valuable guide to current research on game-based methods in computer science for undergraduate and graduate students. It will also interest researchers working in mathematical logic, computer science and game theory.

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Review

"The last lecture is, from my point of view, the most insightful... it is itself well worth the price of the book."
Fernando Berzal, Computing Reviews

Book Description

An excellent introduction to various aspects of game theory relevant for many applications in computer science. Lectures range from tutorials concerning fundamental notions and methods to more advanced presentations of current research topics. This is a valuable guide to current research for both students and researchers alike.

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Amazon.com: 3.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not what it says on the title Dec 26 2012
By Dominik Peters - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
The book and its description claim to embed the tools of Game Theory into a Computer Science context. But really it doesn't. Confusingly, there are two conflicting uses of the word 'game' in this area: On the one hand, there is Game Theory with its models of strategic interaction between decision makers - a 'solution' of such a game is prediction/prescription/explanation of the outcome of this interaction. In computer science (and verification in particular) a different notion of a 'parity game' is considered. But this is done with a completely different aim, no insights of game theory apply.

This book opens with a traditional account of game theory (which is obtainable from innumerable other books) but then considers (with the exception of two more chapters) the disjoint Computer-Science-idea of a game. So this is a book about two different topics that somehow fail to be distinguished. [I did not read much of the book, as it isn't about what I got it for, the content seems solid.] For those who look for computational views on game theory, other books will be required. Possibilities in that area are:
- Computational Aspects of Cooperative Game Theory (Synthesis Lectures on Artificial Inetlligence and Machine Learning) (accessible and very good)
- Algorithmic Game Theory
- Multiagent Systems: Algorithmic, Game-Theoretic, and Logical Foundations
- Combinatorial Auctions (select chapters)

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