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Lessons from the Identity Trail: Anonymity, Privacy and Identity in a Networked Society Hardcover – Mar 16 2009


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Amazon.com: 1 review
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Rather not rate Feb. 29 2012
By Vo Blinn - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The title popped up in search for IAM (Identity Access Management) literature.
Please, keep that in mind as that is the reviewer viewpoint.

Reviewer's subjective opinion (at the time of writing) is based solely on the
contents of ch 6 and 7, Part I - Privacy.

Foremost, this work (or, rather, a compilation) is not on information
security.
It is a nicely worded philosophical tractate on the needs of an individual
(privacy, anonymity) in an affluent hypothetical society, presenting a gap
analysis between as-is and the ideal outlined target.

This book might serve as a good source of reasoning in discussions between
privacy and security officers.

Rating: since the reviewer viewpoint differs significantly from that of the authors,
please, disregard the rating, enforced by the host.

Among things that do not sit well with the reviewer is a lack of references to
a well established/common sources, as in case with definition of "data surveillance"
taken from Clark's "Privacy Introductions and Definitions" (2006) ==> 4.

Thank you for your time!


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