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Let It Die Import


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Frequently Bought Together

Let It Die + NEW Feist - Reminder (CD) + Metals (Vinyl)
Price For All Three: CDN$ 60.92

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 26 2005)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Universal
  • ASIN: B0008KLVW8
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)

1. Gatekeeper
2. Mushaboom
3. Let It Die
4. One Evening
5. Leisure Suite
6. Lonely Lonely
7. When I Was A Young Girl
8. Secret Heart
9. Inside And Out
10. Tout Doucement
11. Now At Last

Product Description

Product Description

Feist is a Canadian songstress, hailing from Toronto. Her first album 'Let It Die', is produced by Renaud Letang & Gonzales. Feist has been Gonzales' fellow for years. Part of the Canadian collective band, Broken Social Scene, Gonzales convinced her to come to Paris to record this first album. The journey started in an out of time, out of norm atmosphere, whose lush grooves are offset by a thoroughly enjoyable live performance, with members of the Germany via Toronto Kitty-Yo crew such as Peaches, Gonzales, & Taylor Savvy. Features 11 tracks including the singles 'Mushroom' & 'One Evening'. Universal.

Amazon.ca

Canadian singer Leslie Feist has served as a guest vocalist for Norwegian folkies Kings of Convenience, Toronto power-pop troupe Broken Social Scene and - under the frightening name 'Bitch Lap-Lap' - the hairy female rapper Peaches. But her unruly resume hardly prepares you for the emotionally rich, softy sensual music on her major label debut. Moving from tortured torch songs such as "Lonely Lonely" to pulsating originals like "Mushaboom", it also contains stunning remakes of Ron Sexsmith's "Secret Heart" and the Bee Gees' "Inside and Out," tunes Feist not only makes her own but effectively uses to dissect her romantic desolation. "Don't you wish we could forget that kiss?" she smolders on the title track. Not in this lifetime. --Aidin Vaziri --This text refers to an alternate Audio CD edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Jan. 1 2006
Format: Audio CD
Does Leslie Feist sound familiar?

If she does, it's because of her musical resume, which includes Canadian indie-popsters Broken Social Scene, rapper Peaches and the Kings of Convenience. That sort of resume also makes you wonder: what will her second solo album, "Let It Die," sound like?

Well, this is what it sounds like: Stripped down, sensual pop music, with a little bit of jazz and trip-hop around the edges. It kicks off with only an acoustic guitar, before Feist jumps in like an orphaned torch singer who wants you to hear her. "Well it's time to begin/as the summer sets in/It's the scene you set for new lovers," she croons.

From there on, Feist doesn't even slow down. She ventures into cheery, catchy pop like "Mushaboom," sensual slow ballads, rippling trippy songs, and smooth torch songs. There's even -- surprisingly -- a cover of the Bee Gees' "Inside And Out," which she gives a funky spin, and a delicately catchy cover of Ron Sexsmith's underrated "Secret Heart."

Additionally, there are several bonus tracks, including a remix and a piano version of one song. But these aren't quite up to the level of the main body of music here. Pretty, yes, but not outstanding.

Feist's music isn't the sort that sets off fireworks and sets you raving about how much fun it is, quality be damned. "Let It Die" is the sort of album that is periodically hailed as being the real deal -- no studio tricks, only a dab of musical polish, and strong reliance on good songwriting and tunes rather than hooks. In other words, this is not a studio creation, but pure music.

But if the music is lovely, Feist is even better. Her vocals are front-and-center, and she makes good use of them.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 29 2005
Format: Audio CD
i love this cd so much. its just amazing in the way that it can just take you up, up away from daily life. it just makes you so happy its ridiculous. even if you don't like lo-fi music, you'll still fall for it because of her flowy voice.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Seamus on Sept. 22 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I'm not going to lie, I have a crush on Feist and this CD did nothing to lessen it. I now have Let It Die, The Reminder, and Metals. This album is probably my least favourite of the three, but that's not really a bad thing. This album is much simpler both lyrically and sonically than the other two but that is to be expected as it is her second album but I think her first major album. It's very simple and that's part of it's charm. When I listen to this album it feels like Feist and I are just lazing around on a rainy summer afternoon as she strums away on the guitar. A very nice thought. I think my favourite part of this album are the vocals. Her voice is just so nice and it feels like it's just the two of us on a porch rather than her singing to an entire room which is what the other two albums feel like. What was surprising was the amount of what I would call show tune feel. I'm not a big fan of show tunes at all and this is definitely not a show tunes album at all but there are small elements scattered through the album and I think that's pretty neat. I was particularly impressed by her cover of Tout Doucement. It's not a song I'm overly interested (or not interested in) but was a pleasant surprise to find on an album done by a modern pop-musician. Overall it's an intimate album that's very pleasant to listen to with a glass of wine on a nice summer evening.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on March 4 2007
Format: Audio CD
If Lesie Feist sounds familiar, it's because of her musical resume -- it ranges from Canadian indie-popsters Broken Social Scene to female rapper Peaches to the Kings of Convenience. That sort of resume also makes one wonder -- what will her solo debut, "Let It Die," sound like?

The answer: Stripped down, sensual pop music, with a touch of jazz and trip-hop around the edges. It kicks off with only the strums of an acoustic guitar, before Feist jumps in like an orphaned torch singer. "Well it's time to begin/as the summer sets in/It's the scene you set for new lovers," she croons.

From there on, Feist doesn't even slow down. She ventures into cheery, catchy pop like "Mushaboom," sensual slow ballads, rippling trippy songs, and smooth torch songs. There's even -- surprisingly -- a cover of the Bee Gees' "Inside And Out," which she gives a funky spin, and a delicately catchy cover of Ron Sexsmith's underrated "Secret Heart."

The flavour of Feist's music isn't the sort that sets off fireworks and sets you raving about how much fun it is. "Let It Die" is the sort of album that is periodically hailed as being the real deal -- no studio tricks, little musical polish, and a reliance on good songwriting and tunes rather than hooks. In other words, pure music.

The star of the music is Feist herself; her vocals are front-and-center, and she proves herself a rare kind of singer. No "American Idol" vocal explosions, no hyperdramatics. Instead, Feist flexes her vocals in all sorts of different ways -- breathy, husky, ethereal and coy, and and moving along with the music in perfect sync.

Not that Feist's good voice doesn't mean that the music isn't also good.
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