Let Your Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of Vocation and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 15.15
  • List Price: CDN$ 20.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 5.84 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
In stock on July 29, 2014.
Order it now.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Let Your Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of Vocation Hardcover – Sep 24 1999


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 15.15
CDN$ 9.32 CDN$ 2.77

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Frequently Bought Together

Let Your Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of Vocation + A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life + The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher's Life
Price For All Three: CDN$ 51.84

Some of these items ship sooner than the others. Show details

  • In stock on July 29, 2014.
    Order it now.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life CDN$ 17.29

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher's Life CDN$ 19.40

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (Sept. 24 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0787947350
  • ISBN-13: 978-0787947354
  • Product Dimensions: 18.5 x 13.4 x 1.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #7,298 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
"Ask me whether what I have done is my life." Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on July 14 2003
Format: Hardcover
One thing that our world does not encourage very well is stopping and listening -- stopping and listening to each other, stopping and listening to life around us, or stopping and listening even to ourselves. This is a skill that, given our cultural conditioning, must be cultivated. That is one of the things that this book by Parker Palmer, 'Let Your Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of Vocation', strives to do -- to help the reader, the seeker, to be more attentive to life.
Palmer is a well-known author in the area of vocational care and consideration. I first encountered Palmer's writing in another book, The Courage to Teach, as various of us explored the meanings of our vocations as educators in the fields of theology and ministry.
Palmer states at the outset in his Gratitudes (a wonderful substitution from the typical words Preface or Introduction) that these chapters have in various guises appeared before. However, they have been re-written to fit together as a complete and unified whole for the purpose of exploring vocation.
Chapter 1: Listening to Life, starts as an exploration through poetry and Palmer's own experience in vocation. What is one called to do? What is the source of vocation? Palmer states: 'Vocation does not come from willfulness. It comes from listening. I must listen to my life and try to understand what it is truly about -- quite apart from what I would like it to be about -- or my life will never represent anything real in the world, no matter how earnest my intentions.'
The very word vocation implies both voice and calling. Crucial to this understanding is that one must be present and attentive to hear that voice, that call.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By "rice222" on Feb. 4 2004
Format: Hardcover
I found this book to be an interesting read into one man's journey toward self-discovery. He has some good insights into how one might take a different view of the world and find one's true vocation.
From my perspective, it was a bit too self-absorbed and self-engrandizing. I would recommend this book to anyone that is depressed about his or her life and needs to find a potential source of comfort. If you have a fairly good sense of self, this book may not be of great benefit.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Feb. 3 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book is little more than a (mercifully) short autobiography of an arrogant and misguided know-it-all. Think of the most self-centered and obnoxious person you know, and then ask yourself if you'd want to read a book they'd written about their own life. To me the book was hard to read because I found the author's personality so annoying. Even when he admits to making mistakes, he strongly hints that it was because he was more intelligent or more ethical than everyone else around him.
Also, throughout the book, he kept blowing the trumpet and waving the banner of his Liberal politics. He apologized a few times for being born a white male, but then he used it as an excuse because, he says, our society teaches all white males that they can do anything they want to do in life. And he feels the pain of all who are not white males because, he says time and again, that our society is, apparently without exception, sexist, racist and homophobic. In one overwrought metaphor, he advises that we should all strive to be like Rosa Parks and sit down on the bus of life and name and claim what is ours. Huh?
Palmer has, for now, concluded that his vocation is to be a writer. Based on this book, I can't agree. Therefore, I cannot recommend a book on vocation written by someone who has apparently chosen the wrong vocation.
If you're looking for a book that is truly full of wisdom, get Thomas Merton's, No Man Is An Island. The entire book sings, and it contains an excellent chapter on vocation.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover
This is a book which will be most meaningful to those who are asking the same kinds of questions related to vocation and purpose which Palmer explores. If one is not at that point (ie. not interested in self-exploration, personal vocation, or integrity between actions and heart), then it will probably seem "self-engrandizing", as one reviewer so eloquently put it.

This book's main theme is finding vocation by listening to one's inner self, not to outer voices. Palmer shows how he spent so much of his life hearing the latter (doing what was expected of him, pursuing a career that did not fit his personality and passion) and therefore was not moving in the right direction; listening to the inner voice (which is so much a part of his Quaker religion) got him on the right track. He talks about how our failures, as much as our successes, can help us understand who we are and what we are meant to do and be.

(By the way I was surprised to read the review by grace (who "likes indiana alot", even its streets--wow!) who says Palmer has not gone through anything "truely" bad. Perhaps two bouts of clinical depression don't meet her qualifications!)

This is a quiet, reflective book that invites the reader to go on an inner journey. If you are looking for excitement and page-turning adventure, you should definitely not buy this.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Most recent customer reviews

Search


Feedback