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Letters to the House Church Movement Paperback – Mar 18 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Xulon Press (March 18 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1613790228
  • ISBN-13: 978-1613790229
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1 x 21.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 272 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #740,345 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Rob Ross on Sept. 17 2011
Format: Paperback
Are you looking for inspiration and encouragement? In this collection of letters Rad shares real responses to real concerns of those involved in the house church movement. They are letters full of encouraging words, practical helps and inspiring ideas. As I read the letters I felt that answers to many of my own concerns regarding simple organic house churches were being addressed to me personally.

This is a book that will benefit both the novice starting out on the journey as well as those who are further down the road. Rad gives his readers both questions to ponder and ideas to act upon. This is a book that I would highly recommend to anyone wanting to be actively involved in what God is doing through simple organic house churches.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John Pritchard on Nov. 7 2011
Format: Paperback
I appreciated how open Rad is about issues he has faced, and allowing us to learn from him, and the others involved. This made his book very relevant in that he answers questions actually being asked, not just by house churches, but by the church in general. If your church is relational at all, than you will be facing situations and people like this.

In his specific reference to the house church movement, he has done us a great service by not only identifying and addressing the issues, but by modeling for us an effective method for communicating with the church - Letters! I too have made a new commitment to communicate with the network I serve by way of letters, in response to what this book has shown me.
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Format: Paperback
'Letters to the House Church Movement' by Rad Zdero is an excellent work. Rad has given us a practical method or medium through over 40 real-life letters to pragmatically and graciously speak to a variety of issues that we have already, or will, come to face in the house churches. It is refreshing to read about real issues and real personalities. It contributes greatly to putting into perspective a healthy house church. The down to earth and frank delivery of these letters helps one stay resolved to continue the journey. The responses in these letters are given graciously and with wisdom. It reminds us to turn back to a simple, biblical, organic model of church. I appreciate the breadth that these letters cover, from the autonomous local house church, to the networking phenomenon, and rippling out to a national house church movement. The book moves from the micro to the macro, encouraging both needed dimensions to complete and fulfill the mission of the church. This is one of those books that should be kept close on hand. Reading this book reminds me of the sons of Issachar, who understood the times and knew what to do!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Your house church FAQs addressed! Sept. 22 2011
By Bessie Pereira - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The title of the book is self-explanatory. However, one realises this isn't just a casual `question & answer' book. Rad deals with many of the FAQs that people ask concerning house/simple church but he does not give mere cursory responses to the usual questions with which he is presented. As I read some of the responses I was very impressed with the thoroughness, sensitivity and detail expressed in these letters. He kept correspondence with some of his enquirers back and forth in some instances until they, or he, felt the issue had been dealt with as fully as possible. I felt challenged to be more careful and fully engaged with those who write to me.

From his own preface, Rad writes "Some were written to challenge or persuade, whereas others were meant simply to encourage the recipient. Some addressed theological issues, while others dealt with on-the-ground practical problems. Some were private communications that were never expected to see the light of day, while others were open and public letters sent to wider bodies of believers. Some were written to close friends, while others were composed for acquaintances or strangers. The aim of this book, is to present to you, an inside look at some of the inner workings, controversies, struggles, victories and personalities that are emerging from within today's worldwide house church movement".

His style is not `preachy' but he engages with the person he is writing to in a very personal way, and rather than writing in theological terms, Rad uses everyday, grassroots language that communicates his message meaningfully with those to whom he is writing, as well as being very `house church' in their tone. He uses Scripture soundly to back up many of his responses giving the recipient the opportunity to research the topic. For these reasons it is a book that those of us who often field questions people ask as well as to pass on to those who are new to simple church.
Some of the issues dealt with in the letters are the usual questions people ask regarding home church such as `Can women lead in a house church?' (chapter 4) to the more complex ones like `What is the place of the City Church that we read about in the Bible in relation to the house church movement?' (chapter 6). In some instances there are multiple responses to questions where people have engaged in an ongoing conversation, or where more than one person has asked the same question.

The chapters in the book divide the letters into sections which makes it much easier to locate areas of interest. Letters to the Reader, Enquirers, a New House Church, Troubled House Churches, Women in House Churches, a House Church Radical, Critics of House Churches, Denominations and Ministries, Elders of House Churches, Apostles of House Churches, Networks of House Churches and to a Nationwide House Church Movement. This gives an idea of the scope of material covered. There is a helpful subject index at the back. OIKOS Australia highly recommends!
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Highly recommended! Jan. 2 2012
By Rebekah Prince - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is for anyone who is involved with, interested in, critical of, or curious about house churches. Rather than painting a picture of the structure of the simple church - the foundation, beams, etc. - this book opens wide the door and invites you to enter in and experience the life of the church for yourself. Although structural aspects are addressed, at the heart of this book (and as indicated on the cover) are real people and real issues.

I believe that anyone who picks up this book with an open mind will walk away encouraged. If you are new to house church, or simply curious, it can help you gain a better understanding of the movement. If you are a member of the "traditional" church this may offer practical inspiration for small groups or church planting. Even if you are critical of house churches there is insight to be gained from this book. As one who has been involved with house churches and leadership teams for several years I found the book inspiring on a number of specific points relating both to my church involvement and my personal faith and calling.

As Rad himself qualifies in the preface these are genuine letters with very little editing - you may or may not agree with everything and Rad himself may have changed his mind on something since it was written - so expect honesty over literary perfection. Nonetheless, the book is well organized and the letters are concise and well-written. The book is not comprehensive, but the letters address a wide range of people and topics, and there are many practical points and scripture references to support them.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Insightful, Comprehensive, Personal Oct. 12 2011
By RDS - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Letters to the House Church Movement is a wonderful collection of personally written letters from an insightful house church veteran. Dr. Zdero's practical wisdom and suggestions run the gamut from conceptual to detailed. His teaching gifts are clearly demonstrated in the letters' clear content and language. A comprehensive list of issues are addressed, from complex theological to personal stuggles and concerns. Much time is spent explaining the practical implementation of house church life, such as how to approach meeting times, how to live as a community outside of meeting times, how to remain focused and relevant, and how to engage in part of a larger network. Dr. Zdero's always encouraging and insightful message is uplifting and his leadership abilities inspiring.

The aspect of this book that I personally enjoy the most is the fact that these are real letters sent to real people, and the humanity and personality of both the author and the recipients come through to make the reader feel like part of the community. An excellent and inspiring read.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Different is good Feb. 8 2012
By ShishkamungaR&R - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I am drowning in books. Literally, I have over 25 books stacked next to my bed. Three new books came in the mail this week. I am overwhelmed with books. Which is why when Rad Zdero's book, "Letters to the House Church Movement" first dropped into my mailbox I wasn't eager to crack it open on the spot and devour it in one sitting. You see, I'm drowning in books.

However, once I did start reading Rad's book I quickly placed all those other books into stand-by mode. Why? Because this book is so practical, and so fascinating, that I had to keep reading to learn more about what God is doing through house churches in his neck of the woods, which incidentally is Toronto, Canada.

The format of the book, as you might have guessed from the title, is a series of letters (always from Zdero's side of the conversation) to different people and addressing different situations in various house churches within Zdero's circle of influence. Much like the epistles of Paul or John or Peter in the New Testament, we get to hear how Zdero responds to conflict in the house church, how he deals with church discipline, what he believes about women in the house church, and much, much more.

Zdero has been involved in the house church movement since 1985. That is roughly when I officially entered the ministry and was licensed and ordained as a Southern Baptist minister of the Gospel. But I've only been involved in the house church movement for about five years now. So, Zdero's level of experience is much broader than mine, and so I can understand why some of the ways he deals with things is different from the way I might deal with the same issue. Plus, he's Canadian. We can't forget that.

But on a more serious note, one of the things I have always loved about the house church movement from the very beginning was the level of freedom and the variety of expression exhibited across the board. I remember reading Robert and Julia Banks' "The Church Comes Home" and marveling at how no two house church groups seemed to approach anything the same way. Whether it was communion or baptism or bible teaching or children's involvement, or whatever, the variety was overwhelming and refreshing to me. And this is what I try to keep in mind as I read Zdero's book. In some chapters, as when he comments about women in the church for example, I find that I agree with him exactly. When he encourages one couple to break off fellowship with another couple because they disagree on doctrine, I find myself disagreeing sincerely. When he writes to house church members and draws the line in the sand and asks them to commit to certain things or disband their church, I find myself unsure of how I feel about that. But, in all of these things, I have grace and respect for Zdero. One, because he's my brother in Christ, and two, because as I've said many times before, we should not base our fellowship with our brothers and sisters in Christ on an agreement of doctrine as much as we base it on our common love for Christ and our commitment to love and serve Him.

Frankly, I found myself inserting my own style of leadership into Zdero's letters at every turn. I found that I could hardly focus on what he was saying to his audience without pausing to ask myself what I might say in the same situation, or how I might respond differently if I were writing a letter to these same people.

I think, on a basic level, Zdero and I are two different kinds of leaders. Whereas he might be more of an Apostolic leader whose calling is to plant many churches and to (as he says in his book), "help spawn the house church movement", I am more like a guy who heard God call him to plant a specific church where 100 percent of the offering could go to help the poor in our community. There's nothing wrong with either calling, of course. But understanding our different roles in the Church is helpful (at least to me) in understanding why Zdero and I are different leaders.

Before you get the idea that I disagree with Zdero on some critical level, let me affirm that most of what he counsels people to do in this book is agreeable to me. I do think that it's important for Churches to develop real community, to be involved in mission outside the four walls, and to practice loving church discipline whenever necessary. We might disagree on "how" to do those things, but we do agree on doing them as best as we can.

Again, Zdero and I agree on many, many more things than we disagree on. I want to make that abundantly clear. This book would make a wonderful contribution to anyone who was curious about how to handle difficulty in a house church setting, how to respond to critics of the house church, and even how to lovingly correct people who are overzealous for all things "house church".

To be fair, I am probably the most permissive and passive leader I have ever met. Almost no one I know takes such a hands-off approach to leadership as I do. And I don't say that to brag. Maybe I'm too footloose when it comes to these issues? I'm not saying I've got it all figured out. But, if you read Zdero's book you should know that not everything he does is typical of all house church practitioners. The reality is more on the side of variety, as I mentioned earlier.

Much like, "The Church Comes Home" by Robert and Julia Banks, Zdero's book does provide a nice snapshot of house church life and addresses many typical challenges faced by those who are involved in this movement. What might be missing from Zdero's book is that variety of experience or perspective found in their book. Due, of course, to the fact that Zdero's book is from his viewpoint only (but then again, my books and articles reflect my bias as well). So, there's not much you can do about this fact except to listen to what he has to say and weigh it against your own understanding of the Scriptures and decide for yourself what you think.

Either way, Zdero's book is an enlightening and challenging collection of thoughts from someone who has invested a large portion of his life to the nurturing of others as they follow Christ into deeper community. I highly recommend this book.

Keith Giles
[...]
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A Practical, Gracious, and Wise Book on House Churches! Dec 4 2011
By Mike - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
"Letters to the House Church Movement" by Rad Zdero is an excellent work. Rad has given us a practical method or medium through over 40 real-life letters to pragmatically and graciously speak to a variety of issues that we have already, or will, come to face in the house churches. It is refreshing to read about real issues and real personalities. It contributes greatly to putting into perspective a healthy house church. The down to earth and frank delivery of these letters helps one stay resolved to continue the journey. The responses in these letters are given graciously and with wisdom. It reminds us to turn back to a simple, biblical, organic model of church. I appreciate the breadth that these letters cover, from the autonomous local house church, to the networking phenomenon, and rippling out to a national house church movement. The book moves from the micro to the macro, encouraging both needed dimensions to complete and fulfill the mission of the church. This is one of those books that should be kept close on hand. Reading this book reminds me of the sons of Issachar, who understood the times and knew what to do!

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