Life, the Universe and Everything (Hitchhikers Guide 3) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.

Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading Life, the Universe and Everything (Hitchhikers Guide 3) on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Life, the Universe and Everything [Abridged] [Audio Cassette]

Douglas Adams
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

May 1985
The unhappy inhabitants of planet Krikkit are sick of looking at the night sky above their heads–so they plan to destroy it. The universe, that is. Now only five individuals stand between the killer robots of Krikkit and their goal of total annihilation.

They are Arthur Dent, a mild-mannered space and time traveler who tries to learn how to fly by throwing himself at the ground and missing; Ford Prefect, his best friend, who decides to go insane to see if he likes it; Slartibartfast, the indomitable vice president of the Campaign for Real Time, who travels in a ship powered by irrational behavior; Zaphod Beeblebrox, the two-headed, three-armed ex-president of the galazy; and Trillian, the sexy space cadet who is torn between a persistent Thunder God and a very depressed Beeblebrox.

How will it all end? Will it end? Only this stalwart crew knows as they try to avert “universal” Armageddon and save life as we know it–and don’t know it!
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

Review

“Wild satire . . . the feckless protagonist, Arthur Dent, is reminiscent of Vonnegut heroes.”—Chicago Tribune


“Adams is one of those rare treasures: an author who, one senses, has as much fun writing as one has reading.”—Arizona Daily Star
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From the Publisher

Join Arthur Dent, earthling, "jerk", kneebiter and time-traveler; sexy space cadet Trillian; mad alien Ford Prefect; unflappable Slartibartfast; two-headed, three-armed ex-head Honcho of the Universe Zaphod Beeblebrox... and learn to fly. Is it the end? With Douglas Adams it's always up in the air! --This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Ho hum... June 21 2003
Format:Mass Market Paperback
"Life, the Universe, and Everything" took me months on end to get through. Every time I opened the book I'd think "Ha, ha! What a funny and crazy man that Adams is. Why don't I read this more?", but after a few pages I'd grow weary. This book is genuinely funny, but I think instead of being a five-book trilogy, the Hitchhiker's franchise should have stopped at one. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy was one of my favorite books for a time, and still holds a special place in my literary tastes. It's hilarious, and Douglas Adams has undoubtedly the sharpest wit this side of Oscar Wilde! Unfortunately, his abilities in the field of plot propulsion are weak at best. I read through this series, loving the first, liking the second, and by the time I got to this one, I just felt like asking what's the POINT? All this book was was another opportunity for the author to demonstrate his wit, which is, i reiterate, amazing. However, it's not enough to keep me reading, ...
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars Literally great while technically lacking April 16 2003
Format:Audio CD
This is a great read. I would highly recommend that anybody with an interest in science fiction, social observation and satire, or both to read the entire Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy trilogy (which is composed of five books). The story is excellent and should be enough to keep anyone interested. The comedy in the series exists at many levels, leaving you to find something new each time you reread it. The fact that Douglas Adamins himself reads his works on this CD set makes it a bonus which shouldn't be turned down. Douglas Adams may be dead, but you can own him forever in mind and voice.
My complaint about this representation of "Life, the Universe and Everything" is technical. Each CD in this set has *ONE* track, making it nearly impossible to stop and restart later. You are forced to use the fast-forward button to skip through minutes of audio instead of just being able to punch the track selection buttons. It is annoying beyond explanation. You would thing anybody who produced Audiobooks would know that you are expected to break your material up into tracks. That is the main benefit over casette tapes!
That one technical rant aside, I would highly suggest anybody with an interest in HHGTTG to get this. If you are a HHGTTG collecter, you should especially pick this up if just for the Douglas Adams narration factor.
Anyway... So long, and thanks for all the fish.
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars The Hitchhiker's trilogy loses some of its focus Jan. 3 2003
By Daniel Jolley TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
Life, the Universe, and Everything is rather different from the preceding two books in the Hitchhiker's Trilogy. It's quite funny, particularly in a few rather memorable sections, but it is not consistently funny from beginning to end. Parts of it were so unspectacular that I barely remembered what I had just read, and one aspect of the concluding scenario is still rather incomprehensible to me, a case of deus ex machina I just can't place in the context of the whole story. All of our favorite characters are back: Arthur Dent, Ford Prefect, Zaphod Beeblebrox, Trillian, Marvin the woefully depressed android, and even Slartibartfast; unfortunately, they are rarely together, and I sometimes lost track of Zaphod in particular after reading a number of chapters that ignored him entirely. Much of the action is also rather contrived, such as the sudden appearance of a couch on prehistoric earth upon which Arthur and Ford travel forward in time to the last two days of earth's existence. On several occasions, characters seemed to zap to another place and time by no discernible means. The game of cricket is particularly important here, to the point that I really wish I understood what the sport is all about, but I admit it was a clever plot device to tie the sport to a particularly nasty, universe-threatening planet ten billion years in the past. The planet of Krikkit, you see, set out to destroy the rest of the universe because its people basically just wanted to be left alone. Throughout the novel white Krikkit robots appear out of nowhere to seize special items needed to unlock their planet from the Slo-Time envelope established around it at the end of the Krikkit Wars. This is a bad thing because the people of Krikkit still want nothing more than to destroy the entire universe. Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Strong Continuation April 13 2002
By bridge
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Though many criticize this book for not being as strong as the first two, this is an excellent book. For starters, this book has some of the most memorable moments of the entire trilogy: Agrajag(a brilliant idea to have, absolutely hilarious), Arthur learning to fly(another wonderfully hilarious idea to have flying actually just "Falling and missing the ground"), Marvin's conversation with Zem, Wowbagger the Infinitely Prolonged's quest, and Slartibartifast's new ship. The novel shows some of the character's personalities very well and develops them further(particularly the poor, neglected Trillian). Ford is wonderfully displayed by showing that he doesn't care about saving the universe when he can attend a party. Zaphod's drinking habits was a very nice little section. Marvin's unhappiness was further displayed by showing it infecting an entire army of robots. Arthur is still as dumbfounded by everything as ever, but at least shows some guts and sensibility. And I've always been a big Slartibartfast fan, and thought it was nice to see him back. I particularly likes his dialogue in this novel, where he will begin a very short sentence and after a large amount of description he will finish it. His "Bistromathic" ship was a funny idea also. The book adds well to the series and provides the major events for the next books(So Long, thanks for All the Fish = God's Last Words; Mostly Harmless = Arthur, Ford, and Trillian's final resting place). It's an excellent read and rests well in my heart because it was the first book in the 5-part trilogy that I ever read(I didn't understand much of it, but loved it anyway). And I believe this is the only Adams novel that a character from another SERIES of his novels comes into play(The Thunder God in this may very well be Thor from "The Long, Dark Tea-time of the Soul," which also got its title from this book!)
Was this review helpful to you?
Want to see more reviews on this item?
Most recent customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Flying : How to Throw Yourself at the Ground and Miss
Written by Douglas Adams, "Life, the Universe and Everything" was first published in 1982 and is the third instalment of his legendary five-part "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy"... Read more
Published on Jan. 25 2007 by Craobh Rua
5.0 out of 5 stars Alice in Wonderland of the 21st Century
This audiobook is absolutly awesome! The title says it all. This is Alice in Wonderland of the 21st Century. The book is very funny, yet fast paced with plenty of action. Read more
Published on March 31 2004
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Funniest And Most Bizarre Books Ever
Adam, Douglas, Life The Universe and Everything. United States: Harmony Books, 1982
One of the Funniest and Most Bizarre Books Ever! Read more
Published on Jan. 22 2003
4.0 out of 5 stars Book 3: Halfway through the trilogy!
This is anohter fine tale from Douglas Adams, taking us on wild adventures with Arthur, and the rest. Read more
Published on May 2 2002 by Anthony Sunclades
4.0 out of 5 stars Not Quite "Everything", But Still Very Good
This third effort by Douglas Adams is still in the same funny vein as the first two books in this sci/fi trilogy, but unfortunately, it is a little weaker. Read more
Published on April 12 2002 by Tim Postma
5.0 out of 5 stars Life, the Universe and Everything
Arthur Dent, Ford Prefect, Zaphod Beeblebrox, Slartibartfast, and Trillian are back in the third novel of Douglas Adams' Hitchhiker's Trilogy, Life, the Universe and Everything,... Read more
Published on March 18 2002 by Alex Romansky
3.0 out of 5 stars Fails Two Surpass its Predecessors
Anyone who has followed the Hitchhiker's series this far, understands the trade-off Adams made to write these books. Read more
Published on Feb. 27 2002 by Zachary S. Houp
3.0 out of 5 stars British? Wow!
Well, I didn't much like this book but then I read the Brititish version and it was much different! And better! Tons of swearing which was changed for Americans is intact! Yay! Read more
Published on Nov. 21 2001 by Lord Maxwell Danger Wolkin
4.0 out of 5 stars Another one in the series that'll make you ponder
Authur Dent and his alien companion Henry Ford are stuck on prehistoric earth. From there anything goes. Read more
Published on Aug. 26 2001
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback