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The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge Paperback – Apr 1 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; Reprint edition (April 1 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0152045732
  • ISBN-13: 978-0152045739
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 17.8 x 21.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 113 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #412,185 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"There is just enough humanizing in the pictures--the intimation of a face on the tower, fog forming a grasping hand--to maintain the human spirit of the story and lead to its message: 'Each to his own place, little brother.' " --New York Herald Tribune

"Such a picture-story book as Mrs. Swift and Mr. Ward have made between them will not only be deeply enjoyed by boys and girls ... but will help to cultivate in them the seeing eye, and make them sensitive to the beauty which they can so easily find around them." --The New York Times

About the Author

HILDEGARD HOYT SWIFT (1890-1977) wrote several books for children. Best known for The Railroad to Freedom, which was cited for a Newbery Honor in 1933, Ms. Swift spent her life recording the lives of heroic Americans on paper. The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge is her most popular picture book.
LYND WARD (1905-1985) illustrated more than two hundred books for children and adults throughout his life. Winner of the Caldecott Medal in 1952, for illustrating The Biggest Bear, Mr. Ward created works that now can be seen in many museum collections throughout the United Staes and abroad.

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Once upon a time a little lighthouse was built on a sharp point of the shore by the Hudson River. Read the first page
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on Jan. 24 2004
Format: Hardcover
Bob Keeshan died yesterday and those of us trying to salve the ache of having a key pillar of our youth pass away having been thinking back on and talking about what made "Captain Kangaroo" the "Sesame Street" of its day. In addition to Mr. Greenjeans and Bunny Rabbit, there were the classic children's books that were read to us by the Captain. On a list of beloved books that includes "Make Way for Ducklings," "Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel," and "Ping," there is also "The Little Red Lighthouse and Great Gray Bridge." So far everybody I have been talking to about Captain Kangaroo has remembered the book and every one of them has driven under the George Washington Bridge in New York City and seen the Little Red Lighthouse that stands watching over the Hudson River.
I think "The Little Red Lighthouse and the Gray Bridge," written by Hildegard Hoyt Swift and illustrated by Lynd Ward, is arguably the most significant of the books we first "read" on "Captain Kangaroo." I have two reasons for this. The first is the powerful metaphor for young children that something little can still be important in a world where some things are much bigger. The second is that the story is "true," in the very real sense that you can see the great gray bridge and see the little red lighthouse, which is never ever going to be torn down just because of this book. The idea that stories can be true is a very important idea for young readers to absorb. I would add the idea that just because something is bigger and newer it is not better, but that certainly would be showing my age, would it not?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Michael Selk on March 19 2003
Format: Hardcover
I wrote my original review of this book on October 2, 1997 (I'm listed as "A reader from the Bronx"). My review still stands, of course (Why should it change? The book's magnificent). As I'd fervently wished for, the copy of this book that my parents gave me when I was 5 is now my four-year-old son's favorite book. He sleeps with it, in fact.
When I was 6, my parents took me to the famous lighthouse, and took a series of pictures that still hangs on my wall. My parents and I are planning soon to recreate that trip, take the same pictures... only with my own son in them now. All of this inspired by a wonderful book that still lives on as a classic childrens' fable.
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Format: Hardcover
"Once upon a time a little lighthouse was built on a sharp point of the shore by the Hudson River. It was round and fat and red. It was fat and red and jolly. And it was VERY, VERY PROUD. Behind it lay New York City where the people lived..." The little red lighthouse was very quiet by day, watching all the ships and people traveling up and down the river. But by night, it was very busy flashing its lights and ringing its bell to keep the ships away from the rocks and danger. "It felt big and useful and important. What would the boats do without me? it thought." Then one day, everything began to change. Workmen came and dug and dug. Enormous steel girders began to rise over the little lighthouse, and huge, heavy cables were strung between the girders. A great gray bridge grew overhead, spanning the river from shore to shore. It made the little lighthouse feel very small and unimportant..... Originally published in 1942, award winning author Hildegarde Swift's, The Little Red Lighthouse And The Great Gray Bridge is as heartwarming and entertaining today, as it was over sixty years ago. Her engaging text, with its happily-ever-after ending, is complemented by Lynd Ward's charming, playful, and expressive illustrations, and together word and art send a simple message that won't be lost on young children...size doesn't equal importance. Perfect for youngsters 3-7, The Little Red Lighthouse And The Great Gray Bridge includes a fascinating afterword on the back cover about the history of the real lighthouse and bridge, portrayed in this story, to further enlighten. This is a timeless classic, to read and share now with friends and family, and future generations in the years to come.Read more ›
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By A Customer on Sept. 26 2003
Format: Paperback
This classic tale deals with feelings of insignificance and uselessness and has been a favorite of readers young and old for generations as it tells the story of a valuable lighthouse overshadowed by a great and new bridge and, ultimately, forgotten. This children's book inspired the reclamation and restoration of the abandoned and neglected Jeffrey's Hook Lighthouse, which today is once again handsome and open for public tours. There are a number of Web sites specific to Jeffrey's Hook Lighthouse and the construction of the Bridge for those interested in more information about either. Visiting these sites may serve as an effective way to introduce young readers to the computer and the Internet...
During my childhood, I passed by the Lighthouse coming and going to my grandmother's home in Brooklyn. The last time I saw it (as an adult), was several years ago through a telescope atop the World Trade Center.
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