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In a Lonely Place (Bilingual)


Price: CDN$ 124.36
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Product Details

  • Actors: Humphrey Bogart, Gloria Grahame, Frank Lovejoy, Carl Benton Reid, Art Smith
  • Directors: Nicholas Ray
  • Writers: Andrew Solt, Dorothy B. Hughes, Edmund H. North
  • Producers: Henry S. Kesler, Robert Lord
  • Format: Black & White, Closed-captioned, Dubbed, DVD-Video, Full Screen, Subtitled, NTSC
  • Language: English, French
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Japanese, Georgian
  • Dubbed: French
  • Subtitles for the Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Canadian Home Video Rating : Ages 14 and over
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • Release Date: March 18 2003
  • Run Time: 94 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000087F79
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #50,517 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Amazon.ca

One of Humphrey Bogart's finest performances dominates this unusual 1950 film noir, which focuses less on the murder mystery at the center of its plot than on the investigation's devastating effect on a fragile romance. For Bogart, already a noir icon, the Andrew Solt script afforded an opportunity to explore a more complex and contradictory role--an antiheroic persona in line with the actor's most accomplished and absorbing triumphs throughout his career.

For maverick director Nicholas Ray, the film posed the challenge of taking crime dramas beyond their usual formulas and into a more mature realm, as well as a chance to cast a jaundiced eye on the film industry itself. Its protagonist is Dixon Steele, a Hollywood screenwriter with an acerbic wit and a violent temper. Tasked with adapting a bestseller, he meets a hatcheck girl who's read the book, hoping to glean its highlights before writing the script. When she's found murdered, Steele becomes the prime suspect, and a tightening knot of suspicion forms around the writer.

Steele's only, inconclusive witness is a pretty new neighbor, Laurel (Gloria Grahame), and the couple fall in love even as the pressure mounts. At first the new relationship is a tonic to the hard-boiled writer, who plunges into his script with a renewed vigor and discipline. But as the police continue to shadow him, Steele's own penchant for violence erupts against friends, strangers, and even Laurel herself, whose feelings are increasingly eclipsed by suspicion that her lover is a murderer, and fear that he'll harm her.

Bogart conveys Steele's world-weariness and underlying vulnerability, and manages the delicate task of making both his romantic yearning and sudden, murderous rages equally convincing. Ultimately, that performance and Grahame's sympathetic work elevate In a Lonely Place into what has been called "an existential love story" more than a crime drama. --Sam Sutherland


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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By gobirds2 on July 13 2004
Format: DVD
IN A LONELY PLACE is a brilliant film from director Nicholas Ray. Humphrey Bogart with his usual cragged-faced presence dominates the screen once again. This time he is a man totally introverted and obsessed with some hidden lack of ability to express his own compassion and humanity. Bogart plays an elusive Hollywood screenwriter named Dixon Steele that becomes the focus of a police investigation of a murder in this atmospheric and unsettling film. What makes the film so unsettling is Bogart's performance. He is a very enigmatic, private and tired man who at times seems so detached from reality that it is frightening. Yet Bogart in this role still posses a virile and cynical coolness of style that is so appealing and it is one that only he can pull off with his screen charisma bringing this character to reality and believability.
In the film Bogart lives in a complex of courtyard apartments. The police investigation interferes with a relationship that Bogart has with Gloria Grahame who lives in the same complex. Bogart comes to be intrigued (and visa versa) by her and truly falls in love with her. Yet it is the police investigation that continues to intensify Bogart's inner struggle as a human being with his need to love and be loved and escalates his volatile and violent outbursts which confuse and distance Grahame from him.
IN A LONELY PLACE examines such human qualities and frailties of love, trust and loyalty. It explores and exposes the effects of our interpretations, perceptions and misconceptions and ultimately demonstrates that our own human flaws can lead to perpetual loneliness of the heart if left unchecked. IN A LONELY PLACE is an outstanding and important film.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Robin Simmons on April 2 2003
Format: DVD
Humphrey Bogart gives his most daring and emotionally complex performance in Nicholas Ray's IN A LONELY PLACE.
Bogie is Dickson Steele (great name, huh?), a Hollywood screenwriter who is prime suspect in a murder after he lures a cute hat check girl to his apartment to read a screenplay and she is found dead a short time later.
Here's a prme example of classic, intelligent, artistic filmmaking by Hollywood's best.
This absolutely gripping film has been restored and looks like new. Highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mark Norvell on Jan. 19 2003
Format: DVD
Excellent psychological noir drama about a cynical Hollywood screenwriter (Humphrey Bogart) with a disturbing violent streak who becomes a suspect in the brutal murder of a hat check girl from the club he frequents. His only alibi is Gloria Grahame, a starlet who's his neighbor in their apartment complex. She covers for him to the police even admitting that she likes his face. They begin a relationship and Grahame discovers his frightening violent tendencies. Now even she begins to doubt his innocence as well as fear for her own safety. Film crackles with cynicism and tension throughout and offers one of Bogart's best performances as the troubled writer struggling with his inner demons. Grahame is excellent in one of her first big roles before becoming the 50's film noir femme fatale she later did. Ironically, the film was directed by the great Nicholas Ray whose marriage to Grahame was falling apart at the time. This could explain why it has a bleak, gloomy feel to it and the two leads are such tormented characters who are powerless over their destinies. A must see, a must on DVD and a must have for those who know what Bogart could do in a role like this, for fans of Grahame and especially for those who are familiar with Nicholas Ray. A potent, adult film that's an underrated and overlooked classic.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Elaine Campbell on June 18 2002
Format: VHS Tape
Filmed in 1950, this film is brilliantly directed by Nicholas Ray. Its production company, Santana Productions, was Bogart's own (Santana was the name of his yawl), which he started in 1948 and sold to Columbia Pictures in 1954, the problem being that his company simply couldn't outbid the large studios for properties he wanted, i.e., Dead End and The Detective Story (some of Santana's films included Knock on Any Door, Tokyo Joe and Sirocco, which Bogart himself called "a stinker").
Eric Lax, the definitive biographer of Humphrey Bogart, believes that he was drawn to this role because he could so closely identify with the character's inner turmoil, problems with women, and a rocky relationship with the ups and downs of the film industry itself. The character he plays is also a heavy drinker. Perhaps because of the similarities, and because Bogart was so greatly talented, his performance in this film leaves one in awe. It is wide and deep, cruel and unbelievably tender, and very, very moving. Gloria Grahame gives unquestionably the best performance of her career. The role was to go to Lauren Bacall, but Warner Brothers refused to lend her to Santana Productions for the film. Though I admire Bacall's early work, I am glad we got Grahame with her flower-like fragility.
It is a murder mystery, but more it is an in-depth character study and even a life study. Dix (Bogart's character) is full of rage which he has for years refused to confront. Laurel (Grahame's character) is lost. Both her film career and her search for a meaningful love are illusive at best. They genuinely fall deeply in love. Was she not strong enough? Was he not brave enough? We see what could have been, and are left with what will never be.
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