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Lonely Planet China 12th Ed.: 12th Edition Paperback – May 1 2011


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Lonely Planet China 12th Ed.: 12th Edition + Lonely Planet Mandarin Phrasebook 8th Ed.: 8th Edition + China Survival Guide: How to Avoid Travel Troubles and Mortifying Mishaps, 3rd Edition
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 1048 pages
  • Publisher: Lonely Planet; 12th edition edition (May 1 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1741795893
  • ISBN-13: 978-1741795899
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 13 x 4.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 839 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #104,029 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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By Patrick on May 24 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Lonely Planet seems to ignore the existence of Internet and its wide availability anywhere including China, so it didn't change its format in the last 20 years:

this very thick book is filled up of information you can easily find on Internet and anyway would like to double check with Internet.

*Hotel:
You will have no difficulty to find more up to date information and wider selection of hotels on Internet, especially in the mid-range bracket (US$20 to $US$30/night). which virtually all offer complimentary wireless Internet making your day to day progression in the country pretty easy without this book.

*Food outlet
LonelyPlanet seems to consistently recommend western chain, like PizzaHut, KFC, Carrefour or other steakhouse, as some of the best address in town. Ah!

If you want get some cultural and historical background on the place you visit: LonelyPlanet is not for you.

Bus/train information is weak at best, often out of date:
would you like to know which city bus bring you from the suburban coach station to downtown and how much time it take: LonelyPlanet is not for you.
would you like to know how much should cost a taxi ride for the same journey (or more generally the rate/km...): LonelyPlanet is not for you.
...

I bought the Kindle edition and it is a disaster (the only advantage is that you don't have to carry the book).
+Pages are not numbered, making hard to go back and for. Chapters are too thick you can't access relevant information from the TOC
+ Map are in English only, so of little use in any environment where all is written in Chinese, and not understandable by the local population.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
We have been going to China for over twenty years and would never go without the latest Lonely Planet travel guide. It has great list of cheap to expensive accommodations and restaurants, and lists of sites and destinations that might otherwise be missed.
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By JuJu on May 20 2012
Format: Paperback
In response to a previous review of this edition that claims LP is politicizing their content as evidenced by their exclusion of Taiwan and commentary about a freer Tibet - I would argue that including Taiwan and ignoring the conflict in Tibet would ALSO be a political statement. While objectivity is a great ideal to strive towards, at some point LP has to make a choice on at least the basic questions in order to produce a guidebook about China:

"is Taiwan part of china?"
"and if so, are we including a chapter on Taiwan as a province of China?"
"what is the nature of the conflict in Tibet?"
"what about Chinese claims to the south china sea?"
"what was the nature of the invasion of India?"

To ignore the behavior of the Chinese government in these regions would do a disservice to both sides of the argument. Inevitably, LP is forced to make those decisions, and usually it seems to come down to drawing on the company mission and/or value statements. Luckily, LP tends to side with 'generally-accepted interpretations' (for lack of a better term) of most issues.

That being said, I do not actually like this specific guidebook. I find the writing format generally lacks opinion and in areas that really do require some color to create a context and broaden understanding. I find the Rough Guide to China is better in this instance.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Zhôngguó Jane on June 1 2010
Format: Paperback
It is incumbent on me to advise all potential buyers of Lonely Planet China that there have been numerous reports from tourists and backpackers in China who have had their LP guidebooks confiscated by immigration officials at all international Chinese airports and border checkpoints. This has to do with several factors, namely that LP heavily politicizes their "guides" with pro-democracy and pro-Tibetan commentary. I personally am all for a free Tibet, but I would never openly say so in China because I don't feel like being deported. Maybe later. Also, LP stupidly did not include Taiwan on their "map" of China, which is pretty much the most offensive thing you can do to Communists. Sometimes I wonder what the editors at LP are thinking. They really are getting cocky. Not to mention that as opposed to the old LP guidebooks that were written by and for backpackers, they are now specifically catering to the middle classes and rarely list any true budget backpacker hostels and eateries. But mostly I just wanted to remind people that you might be throwing away your money by bringing this into China. I actually live and work in China and know what I am talking about.
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