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Lonely Planet East Africa 8th Ed.: 8th Edition Paperback – Jun 1 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 664 pages
  • Publisher: Lonely Planet; 8th Revised edition edition (June 1 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1741047692
  • ISBN-13: 978-1741047691
  • Product Dimensions: 19.5 x 13.5 x 2.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 540 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #172,295 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ronald Warninger on May 15 2001
Format: Paperback
I am a solo female traveler who has just spent three months in East Africa. Every traveler I met had this guide. I agree that it is the 'bible' of east africa. Travelling to this area you don't have much of a choice of travel guides and this gives good information on all the little villages, how to get around, how to survive a matatu.... all the visa infomation, cultural information.... everything you need to have an awesome trip.
I also recommend getting the Trekking East Africa guide if you plan on doing any trekking. It goes more in depth then just the East Africa guide and if you find yourself on a mountain you will want a detailed map, which the East Africa guide lacks.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Gerrit Ruitinga on March 4 2001
Format: Paperback
There are many places in the world you can travel to without a Lonly Planet. East Africa is not part of that. East Africa is no doubt one of the most beautiful parts of the world but travelling and getting around here is not easy at all and has many "dangers" one should be aware of.
There are many ways to do it. You can go on an all organised expensive safari in Kenya or Tanzania. Even then I would think you would like to see some of the places outside the parks like Nairobi or Arusha.
The best way to do it is to travel by yourself. I have done it a couple of times now and find that all the organization by travel agents does not make up for the flexibility you have when you do it yourself. I have been in bad weather conditions necessitating an immediate change of plans. I have been so overwhelmed by the beauty of the Serengeti that I decided on the spot to stay longer. I have been so disgusted by some hotels I prebooked that I decided instantly to look for another one.
This book gives excellent and absolutely necessary guidance to do so. The getting around sections are good and up to date and, believe me, without it you will not find your way out of, e.g.Arusha on a bus to Nairobi. Local assistance is difficult to find.
Booking hotels in countries like Tanzania is not like we are used in the rest of the world. In most of the parks you have one or two lodges and if they are full you are outside; not a nice pprospect when you are right in the middle of the animals. The pricing information is fair and, again, you have to do some planning given the huge differences in prices between hotels.If you plan to stay in the Rhino lodge in the Ngorogoro Crater and the only open one is the Sopa, it will set you back at least an additional $100.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 19 reviews
63 of 64 people found the following review helpful
An absolute necessity for travellers to east Africa March 4 2001
By Gerrit Ruitinga - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
There are many places in the world you can travel to without a Lonly Planet. East Africa is not part of that. East Africa is no doubt one of the most beautiful parts of the world but travelling and getting around here is not easy at all and has many "dangers" one should be aware of.
There are many ways to do it. You can go on an all organised expensive safari in Kenya or Tanzania. Even then I would think you would like to see some of the places outside the parks like Nairobi or Arusha.
The best way to do it is to travel by yourself. I have done it a couple of times now and find that all the organization by travel agents does not make up for the flexibility you have when you do it yourself. I have been in bad weather conditions necessitating an immediate change of plans. I have been so overwhelmed by the beauty of the Serengeti that I decided on the spot to stay longer. I have been so disgusted by some hotels I prebooked that I decided instantly to look for another one.
This book gives excellent and absolutely necessary guidance to do so. The getting around sections are good and up to date and, believe me, without it you will not find your way out of, e.g.Arusha on a bus to Nairobi. Local assistance is difficult to find.
Booking hotels in countries like Tanzania is not like we are used in the rest of the world. In most of the parks you have one or two lodges and if they are full you are outside; not a nice pprospect when you are right in the middle of the animals. The pricing information is fair and, again, you have to do some planning given the huge differences in prices between hotels.If you plan to stay in the Rhino lodge in the Ngorogoro Crater and the only open one is the Sopa, it will set you back at least an additional $100.
All the "facts for visitors" in particular the medical sections are good and should be read carefully. They can keep you from very annoying situations.
The safari sections are good and provide an abundance of companies you can organise your own tours with. They can be checked out in advance. The best way to do it however, if you have time, is to spend a few days in Nairobi or Arusha and compare the offers of the various companies and talk to the owners to see what they provide. You will be amazed how good and cheap these local operators are. A further advantage is that they go off the beaten track, so that you are not having a situation where eleven Volkswagen busses are in a circle around a sleeping lion.
For those reallly into it, try out camping in the Serengeti or Arusha. You will find yourself one with nature and, allthough there are no fences and you should keep a good fire going, relatively safe.
For those less adventurous and on a more tight schedule, the Guide still contains such a wealth of information and little sections on 'nice to knows' that it is well worth the investment.
If I would be allowed to advise I would prefer the Tanzanian side to the Kenyan side for going on safari. It is definitely more beautiful ond not half as busy.
Finally, I will never forget the images I took away from this part of the world. Cheeta's running through the grasslands in chase of prey. Lion mothers tending their cubs, the vast herds of wildebeest, the zebra's, giraffes peeping curiously through the leaves at your car and the wonderful sunsets sitting at a campfire and reflecting and the beauty of creation.
I hope you will enjoy your trip.
22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
This is the only guide to have in East Africa May 15 2001
By Ronald Warninger - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I am a solo female traveler who has just spent three months in East Africa. Every traveler I met had this guide. I agree that it is the 'bible' of east africa. Travelling to this area you don't have much of a choice of travel guides and this gives good information on all the little villages, how to get around, how to survive a matatu.... all the visa infomation, cultural information.... everything you need to have an awesome trip.
I also recommend getting the Trekking East Africa guide if you plan on doing any trekking. It goes more in depth then just the East Africa guide and if you find yourself on a mountain you will want a detailed map, which the East Africa guide lacks.
29 of 31 people found the following review helpful
Don't leave home (for East Africa) without this book! Jan. 11 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I have lived and worked in Africa for 10 years. Loney Planet's East Africa book is "THE BIBLE" of travel in East Africa. You can throw away all the rest of the other travel books for East Africa...this is the one!
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
The one book to take on any safari to Kenya/Tanzania July 7 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
One does not "read" 700 pages of facts about every conceiveable aspect of five countries in East Africa. But as preparation for a visit to the region, no better single source seems to exist for the thoughtful traveler. As the departure date draws near, more and more questions arise about everything from Hepatitis A to the stripes(?) on zebras. With an excellent index, detailed table of contents, and outstanding color plates of wildlife and the people, good and useful answers abound. And no sugar coating. Pungent comments on social conditions, and "cross-cultural" differences lead to one to approach the unfamiliar with confidence. The book has us ready to go. We'll take it along as the only reference we need.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
The Bible! Nov. 8 2005
By Caro Bontekoe - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I think this book has to referred to as The Bible by anyone who has been to East Africa. Great for helping you get around the area. If you are working there like I was it is great for helping you figure out weekend excursions. Assume that the prices aren't exaclty right, especially since you can pretty much negotiate a price for anything anywhere down there. Don't worry about taking other books just get this one and you are set. Have fun in East Africa!

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