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Lonely Planet Middle East 6th Ed.: 6th Edition Paperback – May 1 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 684 pages
  • Publisher: Lonely Planet; 6th Revised edition edition (May 1 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1741046920
  • ISBN-13: 978-1741046922
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 13.1 x 2.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 499 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #444,282 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

As usual the guidebook standard is set by Lonely Planet-- Outside --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

LONELY PLANET aims to cater for every independent traveller, whatever the destination, whatever the style of travel and whatever the phase of the journey.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
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Front Cover | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
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Customer Reviews

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A. McCormick on June 22 2009
Format: Paperback
While I am in the Middle East now, and Express Shipped this item so that it arrived before I left, some of the information is already out of date.

As I was traveling to 3 of the countries within, it did not make sense to haul around the LP for each of them. The book also contains good tips on joining itineraries and crossing from one country to the next.

Interestingly enough, it seems that having the new LP is a status symbol among backpackers around here, and I have loaned it out several times.

As an extensive traveler, I find having a guidebook very handy to make sure you know how much you should be paying, in comparison to the often quoted foreigner price.

While we have had some slight hiccups in our journey, this book has certainly helped out in seeing Egypt, Israel and Jordan. This is a good summary, but if you want more detailed information on any of the countries, check those specific guide books.
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Format: Paperback
When one takes the initial steps of such an exotic trip as the middle east, a guide is needed to educate yourself on everything. Even the experienced traveler will find their trips to Europe did little to prepare them for the Middle East. This is why this guide does so much for the independant, and is so invaluable. Lonely planet has a history of helping people travel on a meagre budget, however gives a warm and caring introduction as to why indulging yourself occasionaly in the more expensive treasures can make your vaction. The authors expell the myths of all around violence in the region and firmly warns you where not to go. The religion and customs sections are so informative that I found myself prepared for the basics of Islamic life and ready to learn more. This book inspired me to take the unbeaten path and to still take in the wonderful tourist draws. Ive browsed through the two other major guides on the middle east, they dont compare to the thorough down to earth writing that Lonely Planet produces. Occasionaly, there could be more entries on Long Distance Travel (getting there and away) and there could have been more mention of the smaller budget tours that are offered in the region, however I still contend that this is the best pick for Middle East travel guides for all traveler of all Budgets.
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Format: Paperback
You should be aware that Libya and Iran - which were included in the 2006 edition of Lonely Planet Middle East - have been removed from the 2009 edition. Now only the countries from Egypt to Turkey plus Iraq are covered. Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States are also not to be found here.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
40 of 45 people found the following review helpful
Middle East on a Shoestring March 22 2000
By Davis Good,am - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
When one takes the initial steps of such an exotic trip as the middle east, a guide is needed to educate yourself on everything. Even the experienced traveler will find their trips to Europe did little to prepare them for the Middle East. This is why this guide does so much for the independant, and is so invaluable. Lonely planet has a history of helping people travel on a meagre budget, however gives a warm and caring introduction as to why indulging yourself occasionaly in the more expensive treasures can make your vaction. The authors expell the myths of all around violence in the region and firmly warns you where not to go. The religion and customs sections are so informative that I found myself prepared for the basics of Islamic life and ready to learn more. This book inspired me to take the unbeaten path and to still take in the wonderful tourist draws. Ive browsed through the two other major guides on the middle east, they dont compare to the thorough down to earth writing that Lonely Planet produces. Occasionaly, there could be more entries on Long Distance Travel (getting there and away) and there could have been more mention of the smaller budget tours that are offered in the region, however I still contend that this is the best pick for Middle East travel guides for all traveler of all Budgets.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Good for my purposes Aug. 27 2010
By El Cid - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Traveling to Egypt and Jordan and wanted a single guide to take with. This one will fit the bill, but missing some detail on the smaller sites we are going to see. I'm sure the individual country books have had more info.

I like the additional tips scattered throughout that point out curiosities as well as practical information.
First time Lonely Planet was so inaccurate April 28 2012
By damionwagner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Wow this book is out dated! I went to the Dead Sea in Israel in May 2010. The owner of the bungalows I thought to stay at laughed at the quoted rate that was about 10% of what he wanted. This happened in Turkey, Jordan, Egypt, Israel and of course Palestine. I use Lonely Planet all the time and this is the first time I have been disappointed.
The general knowledge seemed up to LPs normal quality.
Lonely Panet: Middle East June 21 2011
By David M. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is great. We used it for travel in Egypt, Jordan and Israel during June 2011. We found it to be accurate for suggested lodging, eating places, transportation, Visas, and suggested activities, although some prices had risen since publishing. My only complaint (a small one)is that sometimes prices listed for taxis were ambiguous as to whether cost was per person or per vehicle.
56 of 88 people found the following review helpful
An OK Book, but LP is getting more chinsy by the moment May 7 2006
By ixta_coyotl - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
First of all, let me say I always travel with Lonely Planet books (even in my native Pacific Northwest) as there is no better product on the market for the independent traveler. Others may have their niche: Let's Go! for the college party crowd, Footprints Handbooks for the snooty, Frommer's and Fodor's for those who don't know any better, etc etc etc.

With that said, I cannot believe that LP's definition of the "Middle East" contains Egypt and Libya, but not Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia. The nerdy geographically conservative will certainly protest that those are part of Africa. But even they would not defend the omission of virtually the entire Arabian peninsula from a book on the Middle East. That's right, Lonely Planet's guide to the Middle East does not include Saudi Arabia, U.A.E., Qatar, Bahrain, Kuwait, Yemen, or any other countries located on the Arabian peninsula. They might say it's due to space constraints, but I doubt it. This book has 716 pages. Yet my LP Mexico, which costs $1.00 less according to the SRP on the back, has 1028 pages. And we all know that whenever and wherever LP has a more specific guide covering an area, it always errs on the side of excessive skimping on info in the wider guide. That is certainly no exception even in this half of a travel guide. Since Algeria is off limits to travelers, I am sure they could have covered the rest of North Africa (Tunisia and Morocco) in 100 pages. And 200 more pages to cover the Arabian peninsula (how many non-Muslims venture to Saudi Arabia anyways?) would have been a cinch for information-pinching LP editors. Such a tome would still have had less pages (1016) than LP Mexico, as well as leaving an extra buck for profit. As it sits now in order to get LP's take on the whole Middle East you need to buy four books and shell out around $100 bucks.

One might be tempted to blame LP founder Tony Wheeler directly for such extravagance, but I think slurking corporate insiders might have more to do with it. Mr. Wheeler has made enough dough to keep his whole clan in the sauce for at least a few more generations. As his company has developed and he has grown more distant from day to day operations, he has probably succumbed to more and more "professional" business types who invent scams like this one to make more money in order to justify their salaries. Here's hoping that the Rough Guide and Moonbooks start getting their products up to snuff ASAP so we can all stop subsidizing this type of underhanded customer abuse.


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