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Loose Cannons


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Product Details

  • Actors: Riccardo Scamarcio, Nicole Grimaudo, Alessandro Preziosi
  • Directors: Ferzan Ozpetek
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: Italian
  • Subtitles: English
  • Studio: Mongrel Media
  • Release Date: Sept. 27 2011
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0058MURG2
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #32,074 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Tommy Dooley HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Jan. 22 2012
Format: DVD
I had meant to catch this at the cinema when Peccadillo brought it out (in the UK), but sadly missed it. This is one of those films that comes along far too rarely and when it does, you remember what the magic of cinema really is. This is set in Paloma, where a rich family of pasta makers, are going through a change. The patriarch wants to hand the reins of the very profitable business over to his two sons.

The elder Antonio has stayed to run the factory and put his life on hold for the goodness of the family. His younger brother Tomasso (Riccardo Scamarcio), has been in Rome allegedly studying business, whilst actually indulging his love of literature instead. That is one of his loves, the other happens to be a man. He tells Antonio the night before the surprise family dinner where all is to be handed over, that he will come out the following night. Antonio tries to talk him out of it, all to no avail.

The following night though Antonio surprises everyone by coming out first! The ruddy cheek - and their father quite literally has a fit. He banishes Antonio claiming all he now has left is Tomasso.

That is the stage setting for a wonderfully crafted film, of love jealousy, envy, bigotry and life. All of the characters are developed and all get their time in the lime light - even the maids. That is one aspect of Director Ozpetek's attitude I really like. The `loose cannon' is a reference to Tomasso's Grand Mother, she is the all knowing and understanding heart of the family. She has the sort of advice that you just don't get any more - like "If you always do what others want, life is not worth living".
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
In this film (whose original title is Mine Vaganti), the story takes place in Lecce, capital of Puglia, located in the heel of Italy. Tomasso Cantone (Riccardo Scamarcio), a novelist, returns home to his pasta-making family to announce he's gay. Sadly, his own brother Antonio, who manages the family business, gets in first to announce he's gay too. The father has a heart attack, Antonio is banished and Tomasso must take over the family business.
In short, it's a touching, sentimental comic look at life today.
Director Ferzan Özpetek has done well here, revealing deep emotions in broad strokes. The cast performs nicely, the story is reasonably amusing and there are a few memorable scenes. Well worth watching.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 50 reviews
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
A stunning, beautiful, delightful masterpiece May 3 2011
By J. Martin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Loose Cannons is a beautiful movie about a young gay man in a large, loving and eccentric Southern Italian family. His plan to free himself from the family pasta business by coming out as gay misfires early in the movie, and the remaining ninety minutes cover how his dilemma is resolved.

But this is far, far more than a coming-out movie. Themes of life and death and immortality and family and love lost and found run like deep, rich rivers of life throughout the story, and it is astonishing how much emotional ground is covered so effectively in just one movie. Each one of the dozen or so highly differentiated characters is fully and richly developed, and not one of them is short-changed or stereotyped.

I got Loose Cannons because I have loved the earlier works of Ferzan Ozpetec, particularly His Secret Life, Facing Windows, Sacred Heart, and - most of all - Saturn in Opposition, but Loose Cannons surpasses them all. Each of its predecessors had minor flaws and occasional weak moments, but Loose Cannons has none.

As usual in his movies, photography, sets and music are highly original and perfectly fitted to the story: if it were a silent movie it would be beautiful just to look at; if it were a radio program it would be delightful just to listen to. This is the first of his movies to integrate a significant amount of comedy into his usually serious but highly imaginative dramas, and he does it expertly; I laughed out loud almost as often as I wept with delight.

This movie is a masterpiece. I cannot imagine how a better movie could ever be made, but Ozpetec is young still, so I am confident he will do it somehow. I can say without any reservation at all that this is the best movie I have ever seen.

(In Italian with excellent English subtitles, but the Italian DVD available as of May 2011 has no subtitles for the extensive extra materials.)
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
A Sensitive, Intelligent Coming Out Story, Italian Style June 7 2012
By Grady Harp - Published on Amazon.com
Turkish writer/director Ferzan Ozpetek (His Secret Life, Saturn in Opposition, Facing Windows, Sacred Heart, Steam:The Turkish Bath, etc) has created yet another sensitive, warmly humorous, intelligent movie in LOOSE CANNONS (MINE VAGANTI), a film he co-wrote with Ivan Cotroneo. The film is filled with an extraordinary cast of Italian actors, most of whom we do not know but who deliver some of the most memorable characterizations in recent years. The title for the film `loose cannons' refers to an irresponsible and reckless individual whose behavior (either intended or unintended) endangers the group he or she belongs to. There could not be a better title for this film that examines family life in contemporary Italy.

The film opens with a prelude of a beautiful woman in a bridal gown running across the fields toward the ancient house where she embraces a man Nicola (Giorgio Marchesi, watch his star rise!) and then is lead to her planned wedding to another man. The story then begins. Tommaso (Riccardo Scamarcio) is the youngest son of the Cantone family who own and operate a pasta factory in southern Italy. At a family dinner, parents Vincenzo (Ennio Fantastichini) and Stefania (Lunetta Savino) Cantone plan on turning over the factory to their two sons, Antonio Cantone (Alessandro Preziosi) and Tommaso Cantone. The younger Tommaso, who has returned home from business school in Rome for this dinner, has his own important news that he plans on divulging at that dinner. Beforehand, he tells Antonio his news. He is not in business school and is not at all interested in running the factory, leaving that to Antonio. Rather, he wants to stay in Rome to be a writer - he has submitted a manuscript of a novel to a publisher - but more importantly that he is gay. Tommaso is certain that their parents will respond with anger and be non-supportive. But before Tommaso can make his statement at the dinner, Antonio, who has been working at the factory for years, drops his own bombshell of news that HE is gay on the family, which results in Vincenzo disowning Antonio and having a mild heart attack. Tommaso feels that he has no other choice now but to keep quiet, stay in the closet, and remain at home to run the factory while his father recuperates. A beautiful worker at the factory, Teresa (Paola Minaccioni) though she has problems of her own, is supportive and close to Tommaso, giving the family the idea that all is `straight' with Tommaso. But a visit from Rome by Tommaso's flamboyant gay friends - including Tommaso's lover, Marco (Carmine Recano) - may make life difficult for Tommaso as he tries to balance his priorities in life. His sister Elena (Bianca Nappi) reassures Tommaso that she has know of his sexual preference for years and loves him just the same. Tommaso's paternal grandmother (Ilaria Occhini) who started the factory, who is known as the loose cannon of the family and who has a long kept secret of her own, may have her own say in what happens in the family. The ending of the film draws all the conflicts to conclusion in a deeply tender fashion.

The cast is large and consistently excellent. But it is Ozpetek's genius that shines though in controlling every aspect of this very rewarding film. Another treasure from Italy. In Italian with English subtitles. Grady Harp, June 12
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Fantastic Italian Romp! July 5 2011
By Tommy Dooley - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
I had meant to catch this at the cinema when Peccadillo brought it out, but sadly missed it. This is one of those films that comes along far too rarely and when it does, you remember what the magic of cinema really is. This is set in Paloma, where a rich family of pasta makers, are going through a change. The patriarch wants to hand the reins of the very profitable business over to his two sons.

The elder Antonio has stayed to run the factory and put his life on hold for the goodness of the family. His younger brother Tomasso (Riccardo Scamarcio), has been in Rome allegedly studying business, whilst actually indulging his love of literature instead. That is one of his loves, the other happens to be a man. He tells Antonio the night before the surprise family dinner where all is to be handed over, that he will come out the following night. Antonio tries to talk him out of it, all to no avail.

The following night though Antonio surprises everyone by coming out first! The ruddy cheek - and their father quite literally has a fit. He banishes Antonio claiming all he now has left is Tomasso.

That is the stage setting for a wonderfully crafted film, of love jealousy, envy, bigotry and life. All of the characters are developed and all get their time in the lime light - even the maids. That is one aspect of Director Ozpetek's attitude I really like. The `loose cannon' is a reference to Tomasso's Grand Mother, she is the all knowing and understanding heart of the family. She has the sort of advice that you just don't get any more - like "If you always do what others want, life is not worth living".

There is so much going on from the alcoholic aunt, the looked over sister, the ageing mistress of their father and the towns relentless gossip, that the pace never lets up. It gets even better when Tomasso's boyfriend and close mates all turn up to make sure he is ok.

This is one of the most human and touching yet funny films I have seen in a while, whilst it is gay themed it is really about relationships and family prejudices based on what the neighbours might say. It is in Italian with excellent sub titles and is a must for any fan of World cinema, oh and as it's Italian it is totally stylish too- can not recommend highly enough.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Well shot and acted, hilarius and entertaining. Jan. 3 2011
By must - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Set in the Puglia region of Italy's deep south, the Turkish-born director's Loose Cannons is a light-hearted but considerate outing filled with unabashed passion and affection for its characters and story. Touching on themes of family, love, sexual identity, prejudice and bigotry, Ozpetek's latest fare is both heartfelt and heart-warming, dipping a comedic toe into the oft-told tale of a young man coming to terms with who he really is.
Tommaso (Riccardo Scamarcio) is the youngest child in the large and very eccentric Cantone family. His mother Stefania (Lunetta Savino), is loving and caring, but trapped by bourgeois conventions; while his father, Vincenzo (Ennio Fantastichini), has dangerously high expectations of his children and is just as trapped by his own fears and prejudices. Then there's Tommaso's aunt, the eccentric Luciana (Elena Sofia Ricci); his own sister, the frustrated and overlooked Elena; and his brother, Antonio, who works with their father at the family's pasta factory. Keeping a watchful eye over all of them, though, is the `loose cannon', Tommaso's wise and ever-compassionate grandmother.
Summoned back to the homestead from Rome, Tommaso returns for a family dinner where his father intends to hand over the family business to him and Antonio. Tommaso has other ideas though, wanting nothing to do with the business and hoping to strike out on his own as a writer. Not willing to stop there, he decides to go one better by confronting his family with the fact that he is gay.
That evening, however, his plans of revelation are thwarted by Antonio, who interrupts with an announcement of his own. Antonio's news is no less startling and results in their father suffering a heart attack at the dinner table. Not wanting to risk his father's health further, Tommaso decides to hold back on his announcement. Unfortunately, and as a result of his silence, Tommaso finds himself dragged into everything he hoped to avoid.
What ensues is warm, hilarious and in turn considerate and serious. Forced to run the family business while his father recovers, Tommaso is torn between feelings of family loyalty and those of love and affection for his partner and friends back in Rome. Adding to his confusion is the eccentric and isolated Alba, played by the disarmingly beautiful Nicole Grimaudo. Helping Tommaso come to terms with who he is and what his responsibilities are, Alba struggles herself as she finds herself falling for a man she know she can't have .
Things get even more confused when Tommaso's boyfriend, Marco, and his gay friends, arrive at the family home, running the risk of exposing Tommaso's secret before he's ready. Providing for some of the funniest moments in the film, Marco's entourage also prompt some of the more heart-warming scenes, as Tommaso struggles between what he wants to do and what he should do.
As a film, Loose Cannons is clearly an improvement for Ozpetek as a writer and as a director, with his previous offerings being lacklustre at best. His direction and writing this time round are spot-on thoughout, and finally realise his potential as a masterful and innovative filmmaker.
The same can be said about the cast, with each performance delivering exactly what the respective character warrants and deserves. All involved bring startlingly authentic turns and add the extra weight that the film asks for in a narrative this size. Of particular note are Riccardo Scarmarcio as Tommaso and Nicole Grimaudo as Alba, with their confused relationship providing some of the strongest scenes in the film. Also worth mentioning are the hilarious performances by Ennio Fantastichini as the bigoted and terrified Vincenzo, and by Elena Sofia Ricci as the eccentric Luciana; both characters serve up some of the most laugh-out-loud moments on screen.
The most memorable performance, though, comes from Crescenza Guarnieri (veteran TV actress Ilaria Occhini) as Tommaso's grandmother. It's this character, and Guarnieri's portrayal of her, on which the film hangs. Her patience, wisdom, passive understanding and love for her family and their foibles are what gives the film its heart. The `loose cannon' among a battalion of fiery and extremely volatile characters, the grandmother is the one who gives this film its purpose and gives the audience the rewards it is promised.
Although a very Italian film, its themes and subjects are universal, having been told many times over. Not that this is a hindrance - far from it, as Ozpetek squeezes worthwhile mileage from the `coming out' story. Although this is a storyline and subject on which the film focuses heavily, it is not the film's central theme. At its core, Loose Cannons is a film about following what you love; each character is confronted with their heart's most secret desires and what they really want out of life - do they follow their hearts and do what they really want? Or do they hesitate and do what tradition and family dictate?
Finding out is what makes this film fun. Michael Burgess
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Gay themed comedy with family love at its core Aug. 4 2013
By e s r - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is a very good gay themed film. It is a seriously funny with some teary moments and a lot of really hilarious bits.

I rented it and then bought it. It is worth watching twice at least. I watched it alone then over my husbands shoulder.

we had a great time laughing and sniffing along with the great ensemble actors


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