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Lord of the Flies [Mass Market Paperback]

William Golding
3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (732 customer reviews)

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Book by Golding, William

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
The boy with fair hair lowered himself down the last few feet of rock and began to pick his way toward the lagoon. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Cynicism at its best... Feb. 22 2001
Format:Mass Market Paperback
It's interesting to see how cynical a successfull author can be, and how popular such cynicism can be. Lord of the Flies might be a suspenseful and thought-provoking book, but it's main thesis --children turning into beasts as soon as the burden of civilization is taken off them-- is utterly silly. It makes me wonder how many children Mr. William Golding really knew or talked to before writing this book. Children are always capable (many times much more than grownups) to act with common-sense and responsibility. I think Mr. Golding knew this (he can't be that narrow-minded), but simply choose to forget it since it would destroy his thesis and he wouldn't be able to write this novel. It's also fun to see how easily some authors can ignore or blur the most simple realities. I don't recommend this book to anyone who loves children and childhood, which is a period of exploration and friendships.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The most hopeless book I have ever read Aug. 16 2000
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I really don't know what kind of criteria this book met to receive as much acclamation over the years as it has, it is the absolute worst book I've ever read. Pessimistic, cynical, jaded and completely blind to the truth of the human condition, Golding uses this book as an opportunity to highlight the worst part of the human condition. Golding's message that mankind is imprisoned by civilization, and once we are freed from it we will return to "savage" roots is baseless and nihilistic. Save yourself the agravation and do not read this book. If you are looking for a cautionary tale of some sort, read 1984 by George Orwell or anything other than this insulting piece of overrated literature.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Educational Edition of Lord of the Flies April 9 2014
By Emily
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The book is in great condition. It was also an excellent price. I couldn't be happier with the product. Thank you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Truly a Thought-Provoking Classic! June 14 2005
Format:Audio Cassette
I recently taught this novel to the Seniors at Tampa Bay Tech High School. When I first introduced the title, they were turned off. But somehow we got through it, and once they understood the symbolism and the theme, they got into it.
This novel is not only a classic, it is part of many high school curriculum agendas. For Hillsborough County in Florida, it is the requirement for Seniors. I even read this book as a Senior in 1989.
I have always loved this novel because I really appreciate Golding's artistry and style. He has an incredible vocabulary and yet the story flows in a very easy-to-read and simple manner. The themes are dark, which makes sense considering that the novel came out in 1954 - a very cynical time in the literary world.
In LOTF, Golding presented a story loaded with irony, symbolism, and theme. Man's dark nature, chaos and war, and the loss of innocence are the major themes that run through the novel. Golding was trying to explain that the problems in society are based on human nature, not political structures. I'm sure that Karl Marx would agree with Golding's philosophies at this point in time.
It has a good plot, even though the beginning is focused on character development. There is a lot of action, and a lot of foreshadowing elements. It's basically about a group of boys, who crash land on a deserted island during wartime, and have to survive on their own while they await rescue.
Each of the characters in the novel symbolically represent some figure in society. There's Ralph, who is the elected leader, and Jack who wanted to be the leader and gains control through manipulating the younger/weaker boys with fear and bullying tactics. The human nature conflict is best represented in the struggle for power or control that these two boys face.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Truly a Thought-Provoking Classic! May 23 2005
Format:Audio Cassette
I recently taught this novel to the Seniors at Tampa Bay Tech High School. When I first introduced the title, they were turned off. But somehow we got through it, and once they understood the symbolism and the theme, they got into it.
This novel is not only a classic, it is part of many high school curriculum agendas. For Hillsborough County in Florida, it is the requirement for Seniors. I even read this book as a Senior in 1989.
I have always loved this novel because I really appreciate Golding's artistry and style. He has an incredible vocabulary and yet the story flows in a very easy-to-read and simple manner. The themes are dark, which makes sense considering that the novel came out in 1954 - a very cynical time in the literary world.
In LOTF, Golding presented a story loaded with irony, symbolism, and theme. Man's dark nature, chaos and war, and the loss of innocence are the major themes that run through the novel. Golding was trying to explain that the problems in society are based on human nature, not political structures. I'm sure that Karl Marx would agree with Golding's philosophies at this point in time.
It has a good plot, even though the beginning is focused on character development. There is a lot of action, and a lot of foreshadowing elements. It's basically about a group of boys, who crash land on a deserted island during wartime, and have to survive on their own while they await rescue.
Each of the characters in the novel symbolically represent some figure in society. There's Ralph, who is the elected leader, and Jack who wanted to be the leader and gains control through manipulating the younger/weaker boys with fear and bullying tactics. The human nature conflict is best represented in the struggle for power or control that these two boys face.
Read more ›
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Most recent customer reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars completely unbelievable and a waste of time
I read this book because it is supposed to be a classic. It is an unbelievable story for many reasons. Read more
Published on June 1 2011 by David Huntley
5.0 out of 5 stars "All we have is the rules"
Ever fantasize that you are on an island free from the restraints of society? William Golding has taken that scenario to the nth in this story of a bunch of English boys, plane... Read more
Published on Oct. 3 2010 by bernie
5.0 out of 5 stars THE ORIGINAL IDEA OF PRISTINE SURVIVAL
This being a classic most of us had to read in school, I dared commenting on some plot points - so,
***** *** ** * WARNING: POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD * ** *** *****

A... Read more
Published on March 24 2008 by NeuroSplicer
4.0 out of 5 stars perhaps too simplistic, but still very good
I wonder if this book is in the vein of other dystopian views of the world that were published in the mid-20th century, such as Brave New World and 1984. Read more
Published on Dec 1 2007 by Paul J. Fitzgerald
5.0 out of 5 stars I read this in communications class (english)
i read it and well i liked it so much i watched the 1963 movie right after i finished reading the book! I love how detailed and imaginative it is. Read more
Published on Nov. 23 2006 by Joanna
5.0 out of 5 stars Harrowing idea of what could be
Given the current state of the world, and especially current events as of this writing, it's hard to say that LORD OF THE FLIES is shocking. Read more
Published on Aug. 31 2005 by Abbott McFarlane
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly a Thought-Provoking Classic!
I recently taught this novel to the Seniors at Tampa Bay Tech High School. When I first introduced the title, they were turned off. Read more
Published on July 14 2005 by Scott C. Hacket
4.0 out of 5 stars Lordly book
THE LORD OF THE FLIES, by William Golding, is an interesting book. About thirty boys between the age of six to ten years of age are trapped on a deserted island. Read more
Published on Jan. 25 2005 by Book
5.0 out of 5 stars Lord of the Flies--Review
Given the current state of the world, and especially current events as of this writing, it's hard to say that LORD OF THE FLIES is shocking. Read more
Published on Nov. 17 2004 by Bradley Wallace
5.0 out of 5 stars No Miss Piggy here
Granted, the violence that occurs in this book will repell some. It shouldn't, because it is an excellent look at society or what society can become. Read more
Published on July 26 2004
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