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Lord Of The Flies [Paperback]

William Golding
3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (732 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 11.99
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Book Description

Jan. 1 1958
The tale of a party of shipwrecked schoolboys, marooned on a coral island, who at first enjoy the freedom of the situation but soon divide into fearsome gangs which turn the paradise island into a nightmare of panic and death.

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Lord Of The Flies + To Kill a Mockingbird + The Catcher in the Rye
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Lord of the Flies , William Golding's classic tale about a group of English schoolboys who are plane-wrecked on a deserted island, is just as chilling and relevant today as when it was first published in 1954. At first, the stranded boys cooperate, attempting to gather food, make shelters, and maintain signal fires. Overseeing their efforts are Ralph, "the boy with fair hair," and Piggy, Ralph's chubby, wisdom-dispensing sidekick whose thick spectacles come in handy for lighting fires. Although Ralph tries to impose order and delegate responsibility, there are many in their number who would rather swim, play, or hunt the island's wild pig population. Soon Ralph's rules are being ignored or challenged outright. His fiercest antagonist is Jack, the redheaded leader of the pig hunters, who manages to lure away many of the boys to join his band of painted savages. The situation deteriorates as the trappings of civilization continue to fall away, until Ralph discovers that instead of being hunters, he and Piggy have become the hunted: "He forgot his words, his hunger and thirst, and became fear; hopeless fear on flying feet." Golding's gripping novel explores the boundary between human reason and animal instinct, all on the brutal playing field of adolescent competition. --Jennifer Hubert --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Review

"Lord of the Flies is one of my favorite books. That was a big influence on me as a teenager, I still read it every couple of years." 
-- Suzanne Collins, author of The Hunger Games

"The most influential novel...since Salinger's Catcher in the Rye." 
-- Time

"Lord of the Flies [is my selection for The Book That Changed My Life] because it is both a story with a message and because it is a great tale of adventure. My advice about reading is to do a lot of it."
-- Stephen King, for the National Book Foundation, The Book That Changed My Life

"[T]his brilliant work is a frightening parody on man's return (in a few weeks) to that state of darkness from which it took him thousands of years to emerge. Fully to succeed, a fantasy must approach very close to reality. Lord of the Flies does. It must also be superbly written. It is." 
-- The New York Times Book Review
 
"[S]parely and elegantly written...Lord of the Flies is a grim anti-pastoral in which adults are disguised as children who replicate the worst of their elders' heritage of ignorance, violence, and warfare." 
-- Joyce Carol Oates, New York Review of Books
--This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

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The boy with fair hair lowered himself down the last few feet of rock and began to pick his way toward the lagoon. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Incredibly dull Jan. 23 2002
By Heidi
Format:Mass Market Paperback
In my opinion, this is one of the most boring books ever written. Sure, Golding is trying to make a point about power's effect on social stability and structure, but it is lost in the mumbo jumbo style that he writes with. (The movie is also a pathetic depiction of this cliché-ish message.) There are so many books out there that deal with this same topic, and because of this common subject matter, a novelist needs to be truly inventive to create a real masterpiece. This book should not be ranked anywhere near the top 100 novels on the Modern Library Association's list of the best novels of the 20th century.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Educational Edition of Lord of the Flies April 9 2014
By Emily
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The book is in great condition. It was also an excellent price. I couldn't be happier with the product. Thank you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Truly a Thought-Provoking Classic! June 14 2005
Format:Audio Cassette
I recently taught this novel to the Seniors at Tampa Bay Tech High School. When I first introduced the title, they were turned off. But somehow we got through it, and once they understood the symbolism and the theme, they got into it.
This novel is not only a classic, it is part of many high school curriculum agendas. For Hillsborough County in Florida, it is the requirement for Seniors. I even read this book as a Senior in 1989.
I have always loved this novel because I really appreciate Golding's artistry and style. He has an incredible vocabulary and yet the story flows in a very easy-to-read and simple manner. The themes are dark, which makes sense considering that the novel came out in 1954 - a very cynical time in the literary world.
In LOTF, Golding presented a story loaded with irony, symbolism, and theme. Man's dark nature, chaos and war, and the loss of innocence are the major themes that run through the novel. Golding was trying to explain that the problems in society are based on human nature, not political structures. I'm sure that Karl Marx would agree with Golding's philosophies at this point in time.
It has a good plot, even though the beginning is focused on character development. There is a lot of action, and a lot of foreshadowing elements. It's basically about a group of boys, who crash land on a deserted island during wartime, and have to survive on their own while they await rescue.
Each of the characters in the novel symbolically represent some figure in society. There's Ralph, who is the elected leader, and Jack who wanted to be the leader and gains control through manipulating the younger/weaker boys with fear and bullying tactics. The human nature conflict is best represented in the struggle for power or control that these two boys face.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly a Thought-Provoking Classic! May 23 2005
Format:Audio Cassette
I recently taught this novel to the Seniors at Tampa Bay Tech High School. When I first introduced the title, they were turned off. But somehow we got through it, and once they understood the symbolism and the theme, they got into it.
This novel is not only a classic, it is part of many high school curriculum agendas. For Hillsborough County in Florida, it is the requirement for Seniors. I even read this book as a Senior in 1989.
I have always loved this novel because I really appreciate Golding's artistry and style. He has an incredible vocabulary and yet the story flows in a very easy-to-read and simple manner. The themes are dark, which makes sense considering that the novel came out in 1954 - a very cynical time in the literary world.
In LOTF, Golding presented a story loaded with irony, symbolism, and theme. Man's dark nature, chaos and war, and the loss of innocence are the major themes that run through the novel. Golding was trying to explain that the problems in society are based on human nature, not political structures. I'm sure that Karl Marx would agree with Golding's philosophies at this point in time.
It has a good plot, even though the beginning is focused on character development. There is a lot of action, and a lot of foreshadowing elements. It's basically about a group of boys, who crash land on a deserted island during wartime, and have to survive on their own while they await rescue.
Each of the characters in the novel symbolically represent some figure in society. There's Ralph, who is the elected leader, and Jack who wanted to be the leader and gains control through manipulating the younger/weaker boys with fear and bullying tactics. The human nature conflict is best represented in the struggle for power or control that these two boys face.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly a Thought-Provoking Classic! July 14 2005
Format:Audio Cassette
I recently taught this novel to the Seniors at Tampa Bay Tech High School. When I first introduced the title, they were turned off. But somehow we got through it, and once they understood the symbolism and the theme, they got into it.
This novel is not only a classic, it is part of many high school curriculum agendas. For Hillsborough County in Florida, it is the requirement for Seniors. I even read this book as a Senior in 1989.
I have always loved this novel because I really appreciate Golding's artistry and style. He has an incredible vocabulary and yet the story flows in a very easy-to-read and simple manner. The themes are dark, which makes sense considering that the novel came out in 1954 - a very cynical time in the literary world.
In LOTF, Golding presented a story loaded with irony, symbolism, and theme. Man's dark nature, chaos and war, and the loss of innocence are the major themes that run through the novel. Golding was trying to explain that the problems in society are based on human nature, not political structures. I'm sure that Karl Marx would agree with Golding's philosophies at this point in time.
It has a good plot, even though the beginning is focused on character development. There is a lot of action, and a lot of foreshadowing elements. It's basically about a group of boys, who crash land on a deserted island during wartime, and have to survive on their own while they await rescue.
Each of the characters in the novel symbolically represent some figure in society. There's Ralph, who is the elected leader, and Jack who wanted to be the leader and gains control through manipulating the younger/weaker boys with fear and bullying tactics. The human nature conflict is best represented in the struggle for power or control that these two boys face.
Read more ›
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Most recent customer reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars completely unbelievable and a waste of time
I read this book because it is supposed to be a classic. It is an unbelievable story for many reasons. Read more
Published on June 1 2011 by David Huntley
5.0 out of 5 stars "All we have is the rules"
Ever fantasize that you are on an island free from the restraints of society? William Golding has taken that scenario to the nth in this story of a bunch of English boys, plane... Read more
Published on Oct. 3 2010 by bernie
5.0 out of 5 stars THE ORIGINAL IDEA OF PRISTINE SURVIVAL
This being a classic most of us had to read in school, I dared commenting on some plot points - so,
***** *** ** * WARNING: POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD * ** *** *****

A... Read more
Published on March 24 2008 by NeuroSplicer
4.0 out of 5 stars perhaps too simplistic, but still very good
I wonder if this book is in the vein of other dystopian views of the world that were published in the mid-20th century, such as Brave New World and 1984. Read more
Published on Dec 1 2007 by Paul J. Fitzgerald
5.0 out of 5 stars I read this in communications class (english)
i read it and well i liked it so much i watched the 1963 movie right after i finished reading the book! I love how detailed and imaginative it is. Read more
Published on Nov. 23 2006 by Joanna
5.0 out of 5 stars Harrowing idea of what could be
Given the current state of the world, and especially current events as of this writing, it's hard to say that LORD OF THE FLIES is shocking. Read more
Published on Aug. 31 2005 by Abbott McFarlane
4.0 out of 5 stars Lordly book
THE LORD OF THE FLIES, by William Golding, is an interesting book. About thirty boys between the age of six to ten years of age are trapped on a deserted island. Read more
Published on Jan. 25 2005 by Book
5.0 out of 5 stars Lord of the Flies--Review
Given the current state of the world, and especially current events as of this writing, it's hard to say that LORD OF THE FLIES is shocking. Read more
Published on Nov. 17 2004 by Bradley Wallace
5.0 out of 5 stars No Miss Piggy here
Granted, the violence that occurs in this book will repell some. It shouldn't, because it is an excellent look at society or what society can become. Read more
Published on July 26 2004
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