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The Lost Continent Paperback – Jul 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 108 pages
  • Publisher: Classic Books Library (July 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1600967965
  • ISBN-13: 978-1600967962
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 15.2 x 0.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 213 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Product Description

Review

"I highly recommend Campfire’s comics. They do what they are intended to do and do it in  a way that excites kids about classic literature."

— Chris Wilson, The Graphic Classroom (a resource for teachers and librarians) --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Edgar Rice Burroughs was born in Chicago in 1875. He took inspiration for many of his stories from the classical mythology and literature he studied in his youth, and from the time he spent at an Idaho ranch set up by his brothers.
The story goes that, while proof reading an advertisement for pencil sharpeners in a pulp magazine, inspiration struck. Looking through various magazines, with their tall tales of adventure, he was motivated to write a fantasy story himself. A Princess of Mars appeared as a novel in 1912, and his career as a professional writer took off. Another phenomenally successful novel was Tarzan of the Apes, published in 1914. The character Tarzan went on to become a legend in his own right. He died on March 19, 1950, having written well over 50 novels. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on May 21 2004
Format: Paperback
In "The Lost Continent" (a.k.a. "Beyond Thirty") Edgar Rice Burroughs provides one of his most interesting combinations of adventure and social commentary. The premise behind this alternative history story is that the United States did not get involved in the "Great War" in Europe but instead followed its isolationist tendencies to such an extreme ("The East for the East...The West for the West") that no one from the United States has gone past 30 degrees or 175 degrees latitude for over 160 years, which means no one in America even knows who won the war.
It is now 2137 and a raging storm has thrown the Pan-American aero-submarine "Coldwater" past the 30 degree mark. The damaged vessel under the command of Lt. Jefferson Turck lands in England and German helmet and Felis tigers. In time, the crew will discover what happened to "The Lost Continent" of the Old World. Of course, since this is a ERB novel we know that there will be a damsel in distress for Lt. Turck to save from the great evils that he finds in the Europe that has slipped back into barbarism the way it did after the fall of the Roman Empire.
One of the main strengths of Burroughs was his ability to create ancient civilizations. "The Lost Continent" is actually atypical for Burroughs who usually plunges his heroes into these strange new worlds a lot quicker than what happens in this novel, so this time around there is much more of a sense of mystery to the proceedings. Still, by the last half of the novel we are definitely on familiar and well-trod ground in terms of a ERB adventure story.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Burroughs adds some social commentary to his adventure May 21 2004
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In "The Lost Continent" (a.k.a. "Beyond Thirty") Edgar Rice Burroughs provides one of his most interesting combinations of adventure and social commentary. The premise behind this alternative history story is that the United States did not get involved in the "Great War" in Europe but instead followed its isolationist tendencies to such an extreme ("The East for the East...The West for the West") that no one from the United States has gone past 30 degrees or 175 degrees latitude for over 160 years, which means no one in America even knows who won the war.
It is now 2137 and a raging storm has thrown the Pan-American aero-submarine "Coldwater" past the 30 degree mark. The damaged vessel under the command of Lt. Jefferson Turck lands in England and German helmet and Felis tigers. In time, the crew will discover what happened to "The Lost Continent" of the Old World. Of course, since this is a ERB novel we know that there will be a damsel in distress for Lt. Turck to save from the great evils that he finds in the Europe that has slipped back into barbarism the way it did after the fall of the Roman Empire.
One of the main strengths of Burroughs was his ability to create ancient civilizations. "The Lost Continent" is actually atypical for Burroughs who usually plunges his heroes into these strange new worlds a lot quicker than what happens in this novel, so this time around there is much more of a sense of mystery to the proceedings. Still, by the last half of the novel we are definitely on familiar and well-trod ground in terms of a ERB adventure story.
Before World War II Burroughs wrote "Beyond the Farthest Star," about a distant planet that had been at war for centuries and where technological advances in warfare threatened to destroy all life, which makes it the other ERB novel to check out if you are interested in looking at another example of his rare attempts at social commentary. I do not think the payoff is worthy of the set up in "The Lost Continent," but it is intriguing to think that the United States completely cutting all ties with Europe was a viable basis for telling a futuristic adventure.
Whatever happened to England? Jan. 15 2014
By D.S.Thurlow - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Edgar Rice Burroughs' venerable science fiction thriller "The Lost Continent" gets the graphic novel treatment in this Campfire Books edition. The story itself is something different from his other works. It is set in the year 2137. The Western Hemisphere has been united as one nation, protected by a combined military. No one has visited the Eastern Hemisphere since the time of what the reader knows as the First World War. One day, a Pan-American naval vessel gets into mechanical difficulties in mid-Atlantic, leaving behind a handful of sailors in a small craft. The sailors, led by the enterprising Lieutenant Jefferson Turck, reach what used to be England, and find something very surprising there.

"The Lost Continent" is an imaginative riff on what might have happened to a Europe that tore itself to pieces in the First World War, only to fall prey to other, unexpected civilizations. The story is full of wild animals, strange barbarians and stranger societies, a little romance and much adventure. As other reviewers have noted, there is a certain amount of social commentary, which may or may not resonate with the casual reader. It is certainly another fun science fiction read and recommended to Edgar Rice Burroughs' fans.
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Fans of ERB will probably enjoy it June 2 2005
By J. Green - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Written in 1916 by Edgar Rice Burroughs, "The Lost Continent" is the story of Jefferson Turck, a 21 year old Navy Lieutenant for Pan America. The premise is that the US and the rest of the western hemisphere didn't participate in the "Great War" (World War I), and Europe went on to destroy itself. And since the consolidation of all North and South America nations into the single nation of Pan America, no one has bothered to travel outside the longitude boundaries of 30d on the east and 175d on the west. But due to an act of sabotage his airplane/submarine/ship ends up beyond 30d and he and a few comrades eventually come ashore in Europe, where he finds a land of lions, tigers, and a few savage people.

I assume this was meant as a social commentary to say that the only outcome of the war would be destruction. But for a futuristic story, I find it unimaginitive and lacking any real vision. Other than the airplane/submarine/ship creation, the men appear to fire regular rifles similar to what would have existed in 1916. And while I don't find the writing style particularly appealing, I realize that ERB has a lot of fans out there who do appreciate it. So I guess fans of ERB will enjoy this book a lot more than I did (I read the PDA version).
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
One of ERB's most original and idealistic stories May 21 2009
By OAKSHAMAN - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book came as a very pleasant surprise. I had thought that I was familiar with all of Burrough's work and then I came across this book- after all these years a new ERB! Written in his classic style, I could not hope for better.

It is also, as far as I am concerned, one of his most original books. Written in 1916, it postulates a world where WW1 never ended. Instead, the combatants kept fighting for decades until they reduced themselves to the level of the stone age. Reflecting the American sentiment for noninvolvement, the United States combines with the rest of the Americas to form the United Americas- a fortress of civilization barricaded against any contact with the world beyond the seas. That is how it remained for two centuries until the aero-submarine Coldwater under the command of Captain Jefferson Turck of the Pan-American Navy was driven east of 30 degrees longitude by mechanical failure and storm...

I can see why this book was never reprinted after its first appearance in 1916 for it is essentially an anti-war story. There is plenty of action and adventure on the individual level but it basically opposes war on the industrial scale as suicidal stupidity. The Wilson government censors would have made sure that such a book never saw the light of day again after our entry into the war. As it is however, this is probably the most idealistic thing that ERB ever wrote.

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