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Lost Discoveries: The Ancient Roots of Modern Science-- from the Babylonians to the Maya Library Binding – Apr 25 2008


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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Library Binding: 496 pages
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1435266765
  • ISBN-13: 978-1435266766
  • Product Dimensions: 21.8 x 14 x 4.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 454 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,594,764 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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First Sentence
THE most important scientific achievement in Western history is commonly ascribed to Nicolaus Copernicus, who on his deathbed published Concerning the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Norman J. Levitt on Sept. 14 2003
Format: Hardcover
teachers and librarians deserve to be forewarned that this book provides hard evidence that complaints about "political correctness" are not mere right-wing fantasy. Teresi's understanding of mathematics and science is, despite apparent credentials, fatally shallow and distorted. His willingness to concoct historically insupportable myths that are pleasing to his political sensibilities is obvious on every page. His eagerness to insinuate himself into the good graces of the supposed educators who incessantly preach the virtues of "multiculturalism" and the vices of "eurocentrism" is palpable and pervasive. The book is, in short, a stew of junk science and fake history. But in these peculiar times, it will probably sell very briskly to certain people who mean well but think badly.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Dec 26 2002
Format: Hardcover
Just what the world needs - more doggerel about how scientific achievement by white people is actually theft from other civilizations.
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By Ric Warner on Jan. 29 2005
Format: Paperback
The re-discovery of the truth
This book is really a digest about the "THE ANCIENT ROOTS OF MODERN SCIENCE" since it gives synopsis of events with timelines of some Europeans and non-Europeans. It is the first book I read that focuses and attempts to highlight that there was an 'earlier civilization' prior to these "Modern Times".
Overall, it was a challenging book to read and it reminded me of the first time I took up Physics in university...daunting, intriguing and an excellent substitute for caffeine. I really enjoy reading Mathematics, Astronomy and Technology sections of the book. I was disappointed with the attempt in correlating the 'Ancients' curiosity in the Physics and Chemistry sections, I did not get it and I will not since I will not revisit that section. I was totally lost with the whole GEOLOGY bit and it best left as it is. The Mathematics, Astronomy and Technology sections were fantastic. Some areas I will revisit again and definitely use as a reference.
My best section was "Mathematics: The Language of Science" since it was wonderful reading and working my way through-it. I was around my desk, dinning table and coffee table trying out the 'little tricks'; which made me smile in the wee hours of the morning. I recall my mother using some of these tricks when she "did her arithmetic in her head" and friends who dazzle co-workers and cashiers with multiplications/additions of large numbers quicker than one enter them in a calculator.
Moreover, it is unfortunate that in these modern times one is lost when one cannot use an icons on a cash register or computer for simple arithmetic...it is a pity we have progressed so far around this ring of civilization.
I good book...I enjoy it and have recommended it to my friends and peers.
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Format: Hardcover
Any book that attempts to revise the prevalent Western/White/Post-Industrial/European/American(?) weltanschauung by uncovering and suggesting the HUGE influences of Eastern/Hindu/Islamic/Chinese thought and technology, is bound to get flack.
So far, Teresi's book has not got as much flack...which is quite heartwarming.
This being the first book of its kind that I have read outside India, I have nothing to compare it with. There are any number of indian publications under the title "Vedic Mathematics", that illustrate the sophistication possible with non-mainstream mathematics. I remember reading a totally original vedic proof of "Pythagoras'" theorem that was elegant, complete and just 3 lines long!
However, the author covers so much ground, and attempts to pack tons of information in a moderately sized book (around 300 pages), that at times the facts come faster than the mind can process. And although he's taken the easy way out by classifying chapters with broad categories, that has lead to a lot of repetition of facts within the book. A more efficient categorization would be by actual elements of discussion - say 1) Algebra 2) Civic Amenities 3)Metallurgy . This way a discourse of the general aspects of a civilization could have been relegated to appendices, and the bok itself would have more of a "tabular" comparison approach. But that's just me.
Kudos to Teresi for the amount of research done for this book. The references list a staggering number of sources, and so much about my own culture (Indian) was revealed to me through this book. Sadly, the text books in India are lame reincarnations and faded copies of books instituted during the British rule.
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Format: Hardcover
Any book that attempts to revise the prevalent Western/White/Post-Industrial/European/American(?) weltanschauung by suggesting HUGE influences from Eastern/Hindu/Islamic/Chinese thought and technology, is bound to get flak.
So far, Teresi's book has not got as much flak...which is quite heartwarming.
This being the first book of its kind that I have read outside India, I have nothing to compare it with. There are any number of indian publications under the title "Vedic Mathematics", that illustrate the sophistication possible with non-mainstream mathematics. I remember reading a totally original vedic proof of "Pythagoras'" theorem that was elegant, complete and just 3 lines long!
However, the author covers so much ground, and attempts to pack tons of information in a moderately sized book (around 300 pages), that at times the facts come faster than the mind can process. And although he's taken the easy way out by classifying chapters with broad categories, that has lead to a lot of repetition of facts within the book. A more efficient categorization would be by actual elements of discussion - say 1) Algebra 2) Civic Amenities 3)Metallurgy . This way a discourse of the general aspects of a civilization could have been relegated to appendices, and the bok itself would have more of a "tabular" comparison approach. But that's just me.
Kudos to Teresi for the amount of research done for this book. The references list a staggering number of sources, and so much about my own culture (Indian) was revealed to me through this book. Sadly, the text books in India are lame reincarnations and faded copies of books instituted during the British rule.
Read more ›
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