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Lost on Venus: (#2) [Mass Market Paperback]

Edgar Rice Burroughs
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Book Description

June 15 1991 Venus No 2
Lost! Space adventurer Carson Napier made a grievous miscalculation and became stranded on dangerous, mist-shrouded Venus. But Napier refused to quit. He won the love of the beautiful Duare, princess of Vepaja, became a pirate, fought villains, then lost his beloved to the evil Thorist kidnappers.
 
Napier's adventures on Venus continue in this pulse-pounding sequel to Pirates of Venus. Here the intrepid and wry explorer takes on a savage world in order to rescue the princess from her sworn enemies. Napier’s epic quest for Duare takes him through the streets of the City of the Dead, into the terrifying Room of the Seven Doors, and face to face with fantastic and perilous creatures. Featuring what may be Burroughs’s most realistic hero, Lost on Venus brims with the action, suspense, and wit unique to the Master of Adventure.
 
This edition features an introduction by celebrated writer Kevin J. Anderson and the original illustrations by J. Allen St. John.
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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About the Author

Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875–1950) was the author of Tarzan of the Apes. His novels The Moon Maid, Under the Moons of Mars, and Pellucidar are all available in the Bison Frontiers of Imagination series. Kevin J. Anderson is the author of such works of speculative fiction as Hidden Empire, Forest of Stars, Hopscotch, and, with Brian Herbert, the prequels to Frank Herbert’s Dune.
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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4.0 out of 5 stars The adventure continues July 11 2004
Format:Paperback
The second novel in Edgar Rice Burroughs' Venus series. Space-faring earthman Carson Napier was separated from his beloved princess Duare at the conclusion of the previous novel. Now, he is after her once again, determined to get her home safely to her kingdom of Vepaja, and the result is the literary equivalent of one of the old Saturday morning serials with just a pinch of social commentary. From the Room of the Seven Doors, down the River of Death to the City of the Dead, where a mad scientist presides over a kingdom of zombies, and the beautiful city of Havatoo, which is a paradise but only if your lineage is pure, Carson and Duare bounce from predicament to predicament. Will they survive their adventures? Will Duare drop her haughty facade and accept Carson's love? Is there any doubt? Not really, but getting there is the fun. This series benefits by being more humorous than most of Burroughs' work.
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Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Carson pursues Duare the janjong across Amtor Sept. 30 2003
By Lawrance M. Bernabo - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
"Lost on Venus" is the second volume in Edgar Rice Burrough's Carson of Venus series and a rather ironic title since our hero left Earth on a spaceship headed for Mars but ended up on Venus because he forgot to take into account the moon's gravitational pull. Fortunately it turns out that Venus not only has a breathable atmosphere but is inhabited. In "Pirates of Venus," Carson Napier learns about the politics and culture of the planet called Amtor and fell in love with Duare, the daughter of a jong (i.e., she is a princess). Of course, in grand ERB tradition, by the end of that first novel Carson and his beloved were separated by a cruel fate (she is carried away by a flying creature and he is captured by a Thorist spy, and the time has come for him to do something about that.
Originally published as a serial in "Argosy Weekly" in 1933, this pulp fiction adventure is communicated to ERB by Napier himself, using telepathy (I liked the Gridley from the Barsoom books better). Carson is held captive and is put in a room where there are seven doors: one leads to escape, the rest to horrible deaths. This is a fairly interesting start to the story and ERB has some fun coming up with a way for his hero to get out of this predicament. Carson, who is given the name Albargan ("No-Hair-Man") by the natives, catches up with Duare, who keeps insisting that he is too low to speak to her since she is a janjong and he is a nobody. There are some interesting science fiction notions, as when Carson considers the Amtorian theory of the cosmos, which is totally wrong since the planet's constant cloud cover keeps them from seeing anything else in the solar system.
Even though you find all of the standard Burroughs elements from the romantic adventure formula that made him famous as Carson pursues Duare, "Lost on Venus" really is more of a political polemic than his standard stories. This book continues the political satire of the series with the Thorists clearly intended to represent the Communists and it is hard not to see the scientifically advanced city of Havatoo as representing an Aryan wonderland in the Nazi tradition (later on in the series ERB clearly takes aim at Mussolini's brand of fascism as well). "Pirates of Venus" is not really considered a dystopian novel, but in terms of predicting the political evils that would lead to World War II, Burroughs was fairly accurate. This was the last of the major series that ERB created and during the 1930s it really represented his best work, which would seem to indicate that his political passions in the Venus books worked to his advantage.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The adventure continues July 11 2004
By David Bonesteel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The second novel in Edgar Rice Burroughs' Venus series. Space-faring earthman Carson Napier was separated from his beloved princess Duare at the conclusion of the previous novel. Now, he is after her once again, determined to get her home safely to her kingdom of Vepaja, and the result is the literary equivalent of one of the old Saturday morning serials with just a pinch of social commentary. From the Room of the Seven Doors, down the River of Death to the City of the Dead, where a mad scientist presides over a kingdom of zombies, and the beautiful city of Havatoo, which is a paradise but only if your lineage is pure, Carson and Duare bounce from predicament to predicament. Will they survive their adventures? Will Duare drop her haughty facade and accept Carson's love? Is there any doubt? Not really, but getting there is the fun. This series benefits by being more humorous than most of Burroughs' work.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars To live or die? May 30 2007
By Johnny Heering - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is the second book in Edgar Rice Burroughs' "Carson of Venus" series. It picks up right where the previous book left off, with Carson Napier in the hands of his enemies. He manages to escape and reunites with his ladylove, the beautiful princess Duare. They go through many adventures in an attempt to return to Duare's hometown, eventually becoming seperated again. Carson meets another beautiful princess, Nalte, and has further adventures. Does Carson reunite with Duare by the end of the book? I won't tell, but I'm sure you can guess. This is typical Burroughs, which will appeal to people who like old fashioned adventure stories.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another great story from the master. Oct. 29 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Very entertaining storyline. Gives the reader another chance to imagine an adventure on one of our sister planets. After reading the horrible end to the Martian series, anything would be good. But this storyline is good enough to stand alone.
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Burroughs Pulp Fiction Jan. 28 2013
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Burroughs did a great job of setting up another world with it's own unique parameters, dangers, culture, etc. The adventure was awesome, the love story was trite, the action was strong. Perfect pulp fiction.
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