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Loulou (Widescreen) [Import]


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Product Details

  • Actors: Isabelle Huppert, Gérard Depardieu, Guy Marchand, Humbert Balsan, Bernard Tronczak
  • Directors: Maurice Pialat
  • Writers: Maurice Pialat, Arlette Langmann
  • Producers: Klaus Hellwig, Yves Gasser, Yves Peyrot
  • Format: Anamorphic, Color, Dubbed, DVD-Video, Subtitled, NTSC, Import
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Dubbed: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: NR
  • Studio: New Yorker Video
  • Release Date: April 24 2001
  • Run Time: 101 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • ASIN: B000056EWF

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: VHS Tape
This 1980 French film is a fairly dreary, depressing, anti-romantic character study, featuring Isabelle Huppert as a restless young woman who ditches her boring, tempramental boyfriend for a wild, leather-clad bad boy (played by an incandescent, youthful Gerard Depardieu). The films inches forth through one mildly unsettling scenario to another; the cumulative effect of which is something close to spiritual nausea. It's supposed to be that way, though: this film is very much a precursor to the downcast realism of the 1990s "dogme" scene, skillfully made, but definitely a downer. However, Depardieu is particularly magnetic in this early role... worth it to see him in his prime!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
17 of 23 people found the following review helpful
Nelly June 7 2001
By Peter Shelley - Published on Amazon.com
Format: VHS Tape
Director Maurice Pialat's film is more an exercise in star power than any presentation of narrative, with Isabelle Huppert leaving her husband Guy Marchand for the leather-clad ex-con ruffian Loulou played by Depardieu. Even though the tone takes its cue from the character of Loulou as a womanising drifter, the low key seemingly improvised rambling scenes are preferable to the gab-fests of Eric Rohmer, who is responsible for the negative connotations associated with French films by Americans. This film is actually mistitled since although it is Depardieu that is the catalyst for Huppert to change her life, the story is more hers than his. Or perhaps it is that the representation of her crumbling marriage that is more dramatically interesting than Depardieu's "loafing". If Loulou's character is sketched thinly that may to keep him as an enigma, the mysterious bad-boy that women always seem to prefer. At one point Huppert says of Depardieu, "I prefer a loafer who f**ks, to a rich guy who bugs me". And although we can see how limiting Depardieu's world is to Huppert, we also understand her attraction to him, highlighted by a silent image of the couple stumbling down a street in a drunken embrace. Pialat's best moments involve scenes of violence outbursts - a family get together soured by jealousy, the loud music of a disco drowning out shouting, and a brawl between Depardieu and Marchand in a courtyard with a following drink together as evidence of the French form of civilised behaviour. Huppert also has an early scene with Marchand where the camera follows his pursuit and humiliation of her, and here Huppert's anger invalidates the myth of her as a passive performer. The film also shows us footage of her laughing, which is unusual since her situations are usually so glum, and she is funny when she yells in shocked reaction to being hit, in the famous love scene where the bed collapses, and when she falls in the street by accident. Pialat also gives Marchand a laugh by having him resort to playing the saxophone in depression.
15 of 21 people found the following review helpful
Loulou May 13 2000
By Dohmen Sigrid - Published on Amazon.com
Format: VHS Tape
This movie goes back to the early Eighties and I still remember it, since I went to watch it three times within a few days. It was probably due to the scene where the bed crashes down. It is one of the films of the young Depardieu in couple with Isabelle Huppert and with an excellent Maurice Pialat directing it. In reality nothing really important happens, but the love scenes are nice. Depardieu plays a young guy who is rather happy without being fixed up in regular work and Isabelle Hupper leaves her husband to stay with him. She earns their living and also decides to abort, since Depardieu only wants to work after the birth of the child. This is also the sad fact about the movie that in reality does not have an end. There is also a nice scene with an open air dinner, much fun and lots to eat and to drink.
7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
+1/2 ...outlining a rather sad but steamy affair Jan. 7 2004
By DJ Joe Sixpack - Published on Amazon.com
Format: VHS Tape
This 1980 French film is a fairly dreary, depressing, anti-romantic character study, featuring Isabelle Huppert as a restless young woman who ditches her boring, tempramental boyfriend for a wild, leather-clad bad boy (played by an incandescent, youthful Gerard Depardieu). The films inches forth through one mildly unsettling scenario to another; the cumulative effect of which is something close to spiritual nausea. It's supposed to be that way, though: this film is very much a precursor to the downcast realism of the 1990s "dogme" scene, skillfully made, but definitely a downer. However, Depardieu is particularly magnetic in this early role... worth it to see him in his prime!
reckless life = reckless love Nov. 2 2014
By Luke - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
After watching about 30 minutes of this film I began thinking about turning it off...the characters were really putting me off. But then I realized that this is only a movie, and on top of it ----a French one. There was time in my life when I watched a lot of French productions, one might even say I watched exclusively French films produced during the second half of the 20th century. Loulou (1980) by Maurice Pialat (a French film maker who surely deserves more international recognition) starting the French stars Gerard Depardieu and Isabelle Huppert is one might say a very typical French love story. Depardieu plays the title role of Loulou (affectionately short for Louis) a young ex-convict just released from prison, most likely for stealing which can be inferred during one scene where he and his pals steal boxes of gramophones from a warehouse. Loulou is your typical/ordinary low-life who sleeps all day long, drinks all night long with his buddies and picks up women for one night stands. A man without perspectives nor ambition, a criminal. He represents the lowest strata of society. Isabelle Huppert is Nelly, a wife of a well prospering business man. She lives with her husband in a nice apartment with a maid service, yet she is very unhappy in her marriage, and her husband Andre is very jealous and madly in love with her. One night Nelly while on a night out with her girlfriend runs into Loulou in a local Parisian disco. They began an affair, and Andre is having a difficult time accepting his wives' behavior. This is where the French culture and their concept of sex, loyalty, and ideals comes in. This film, and there are many other French films just like that, beautifully demonstrates how the French perceive adultery and love. There are some scenes in this film that will make you shake your head in disbelief, or might even make you question yourself on how would you behave in similar situation.

One scene for instance, has Nelly and Loulou sitting in a diner when Andre comes in. Nelly and Andre go outside to address the whole situation (separation and finical issues) and she goes inside Andre's car. They begin arguing and Andre explodes and begins hitting her, as she runs away from him Andre follows her into a courtyard. Loulou follows them from the diner and stops Andre from pounding on Nelly, the two scuffle and push each other, but the funny thing is that none of them throw any real punches at one another, they fight in unmanly fashion. Finally, an old woman breaks up the whole scene accusing both men for breaking her mailbox. As the three exit the courtyard into the street, Andre calls on Loulou to talk to him in private. The two men exchange some words in secret and all of a sudden they go back inside the diner (all three) and Andre buys a round of beer for all three of them and they begin drinking and talking as if nothing happened.

Something interesting that I noticed while watching this film is that all men in it are dressed in leather jackets, with exception for maybe one hippie guy. They also sport long and unkempt hair and mustaches (I guess early 1980's fashion). Women are all dressed in fur coats or pea coats.

The movie shocks and provokes...and what I most like about Pialat's films are his ending scenes. There is not much to them, they end as they begin.

If you like this one, I recommend seeing his other films, such as: We Won't Grow Old Together (1972), To Our Loves (1983), and Police (1985).
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Poor Nelly Sept. 27 2009
By floridian321 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
That's a better title than the one they went with, which refers to the character played by Depardieu, because the film is about Huppert's character, who is 25 in this film and already an accomplished actress.

This film, like most dramatic films (and even some comedies), is about poor choices and their consequences. Nelly clearly made a bad decision marrying Andre, a boring, jealous, possessive jerk who overreacts and becomes violent when she so much as looks at other men. Andre may or may not love Nelly but he clearly has no clue what she needs or how she wants to be loved.

Small wonder that Nelly is fed up and dumps Andre. But for womanizing bad boy Loulou, just our of prison, with no visible means of support, and still involved in silly heists with his criminal pals? Hmmmm ...

But wait! It gets better ... um ... worse: Loulou gets Nelly pregnant. Apparently, both missed the class in high school where they tell you about safe sex, or just plain don't care. What happens to the pregnancy is predictable after Nelly visits Loulou's family and realizes this "package deal" is not an improvement over life with Andre -- though I would say the film understates the effect of the abortion on Nelly. There is no happy ending; quite the contrary, we are left with the clear impression Nelly's life will be, as Hobbes says, "nasty, brutish, and short." What is a woman to do? Yes, indeed.

A brief word about the subtitles: They are bare bones; not wrong, mind you, just leave out subtleties that would have added context to the story.


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