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Love And Theft


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3 new from CDN$ 6.77 14 used from CDN$ 0.81

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Sept. 11 2001)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sony Music Canada Inc.
  • ASIN: B00005NI5Y
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (316 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #25,096 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Tweedle Dee & Tweedle Dum
2. Mississippi
3. Summer Days
4. Bye And Bye
5. Lonesome Day Blues
6. Floater (Too Much To Ask)
7. High-Water (For Charley Patton)
8. Moonlight
9. Honest With Me
10. Po' Boy
11. Cry A While
12. Sugar Baby


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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Format: Audio CD
[My original review of LOVE AND THEFT had some significant cuts because of length. I did not get to cover all that I wanted, so this review reincorporates the cuts with new text. This should be read in conjunction with my review of the regular edition.]
Many are curious about Dylan's newest album, LOVE AND THEFT. Its qualities are myriad and must be experienced firsthand. This review deals specifically with the limited edition and what the two bonus tracks bring to this release. For those who have the opportunity, pick up the limited edition as it helps you better understand LOVE AND THEFT.

The central thesis artistically of LOVE AND THEFT is this:

"Remember the past while progressing toward the future."

Dylan said in an interview recently that the music of today is hideous. Dylan once again becomes the voice of a generation, pointing us in the direction our art should be going but is not. Most of the new bands no longer pay attention to tradition. Dylan shows us on this album how rich music can be if we acknowledge what has gone on before yet still maintaining a creative and fresh approach to art, which he does here.

Dylan has always maintained a fresh attitude toward tradition while striving for his own music. He's constantly changing his sound but all his albums have a respect for what has gone on before. Identity is a major issue to him (as SELF-PORTRAIT proved), and he always wants to evolve, so when listening to Dylan the journey becomes really part of the pleasure of listening to him. He proves once again his incredible skills of diversifying and shaking things up. Nothing is a clone in the Dylan catalogue, which is amazing considering his forty year career as a recording artist, and this proves no exception.
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By Daniel Jolley TOP 50 REVIEWER on March 1 2003
Format: Audio CD
Love and Theft is easily Bob Dylan's best CD in a long time. I think a line from the song Mississippi sums this album up fairly well: "Things are starting to get interesting right about now." After almost forty years in the business, Dylan is still putting out some of the best music he has ever written and recorded. It lacks the passion and underlying spirit of rebellion found in his early releases, but Love and Theft stands well above the vast majority of music being recorded these days. In Summer Days, Dylan says that you can repeat the past, and in a way, that is what he has done here. This Bob Dylan is a conglomeration of all the Bob Dylans that have come and gone for; drawing on varied aspects of his musical legacy, he manages to return to the basics while at the same time offering a fresh variety of sounds and musical approaches on these twelve tracks.
Mississippi would be my favorite song here; the manner of Dylan's extended delivery of incredible lyrics brings to mind classic songs such as Tangled Up in Blue. If you like energetic, toe-tapping rockers, Dylan proves he won't be performing sitting down for many a year with Lonesome Day Blues and Cry a While, two songs also heavily tinged with the blues, as well as Honest With Me. Summer Days is quite unusual, combining verifiable swing music with a strong pinch of rockabilly. On High Water (for Charlie Patton), Dylan incorporates the banjo and also possibly the mandolin, while Floater (Too Much to Ask) seems to feature violin music that works especially well in the transitions. I normally would not think of violins and Bob Dylan together, but the combination works fabulously. Floater is also notable for its plucky rhythm and subtly humorous lyrics.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Philippe Mastrogiuseppe on Oct. 26 2011
Format: Audio CD
I got this album around the time it came out. I'm a fan of Bob Dylan, but I didn't really connect with this album at first. Jump about 10 years later, and I really like it now. I'm surprised lots of people seem to think of Mississipi as the best song, I like most of the other tracks better, especially Po' Boy, Tweedle Dee & Tweedle Dum, and Moonlight. It's not a folk album, it's not a rock album, it's not quite pop either. I'd say it's more of a rockabilly/country album, and maybe that turns some people off.
I can understand if someone doesn't like his singing. Although his voice has just about disintegrated at this point, he's far from being as out of tune as he can be heard on other albums. I think it's actually one of his better singing albums, within the limits of the quality of his voice of course.
I recommend to give the album a second chance if you've tried it once and not liked it. It has really grown on me.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By William S. Grigsby on June 11 2002
Format: Audio CD
If 'Blood on the Tracks' is 5 stars (and it surely is) this is maybe a 3 1/2. Can't figure out what all the hoopla over this album was about, but maybe it was because there just wasn't all that much really good stuff out there last year.
I haven't tossed it, but then the first go through didn't make me want to play it again.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Feb. 10 2002
Format: Audio CD
well, it wasn't bad. not by a long shot. i am a little dissapointed in the new sound. i guess i am just more of a fan of dylan's old folk songs, more than his rock and roll. But i have always enjoyed him, up until the 80's. then hee seemed to go sour for a while. but in 88, when he made "Down in the Groove" and in the earliy 90's, i was happy to see his return to hard core folk music. i thought "Time Out Of Mind" was a fine album, deservning of its praise, but again i am saddened by the switch back to a lot of electric.
Love and theft had its share of good tracks, High Water was fabulous, and Mississippi sounded suspiciously like the type from "Time out of Mind". As for the others... i could take or leave them. not what its cracked up to be. But if you like Dylan, might aswell buy it.
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