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Low Budget Hybrid SACD


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1 new from CDN$ 79.12 1 used from CDN$ 81.33

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Nov. 7 2006)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Hybrid SACD
  • Label: KOCH Records
  • ASIN: B000IONTAQ
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #30,802 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Attitude
2. Catch Me Now I'm Falling
3. Pressure
4. National Health
5. (Wish I Could Fly Like) Superman
6. Low Budget
7. In A Space
8. Little Bit Of Emotion
9. A Gallon Of Gas
10. Misery
11. Moving PicturesBONUS TRACKS
12. A Gallon Of Gas (U.S. Single Extended Edit)
13. Catch Me Now I'm Falling (Original Extended Edit)
14. (Wish I Could Fly Like) Superman (Disco Mix Extended Edit


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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

By JC on Sept. 12 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Every song is great on this CD, bought 2 copies, gave one to my musician nephew to give him insight into great bands of the past. Saw Ray Davies solo last year and he played 2 songs from this CD considering his library of material to choose from I was happy. If you are a Kinks fan and have never heard this CD you'll love it, if you don't know much Kinks material this is a great start, buy it!
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By Music Fan on Jan. 13 2004
Format: Audio CD
It's startling that anyone can not find this album to be a Kinks classic. Along with the following album, "Give the People What they Want," this is the Kinks best work. Songls like "Wish I could fly like superman," "Low Budget," and "Catch Me Now I'm Falling," "A Gallon of Gas," and "Attitude" make this an enjoyable listen from start to finish. The late 70s through the mid-80s represent their most productive period. Their work during this time is infinitely better than any albums they put out during the 60s and early 70. Their earkt albums featured the big hits, such as "You Really Got Me" and "Sunny Afternoon," but little else. "Low Budget" represents a period when the albums were strong all around.
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Format: Audio CD
The Kinks were enjoying a second wind once signing with Arista in the mid-1970s after some spotty recordings earlier in the decade. "Sleepwalker" (1977) and "Misfits" (1978) showed the band getting tighter and stronger and the material Ray Davies was writing was approaching some of his best, but nothing could prepare fans for "Low Budget". True to the title the Kinks were at their most stripped down, spontaneous and playful in years. With punk on the ascent Ray Davies figured if you can't join 'em, beat 'em and delivered some of his brashest songs in years. Ostensibly an album about the USA it's Ray at his observational best with songs focusing on relations both personal and global.
The opening blast of "Attitude" really sets the stage as Dave cranks up his guitar and Ray lets rip with a stinging critique on a deserving fool with the wrong mindset. By the end things settle down and Ray is encouraging us all to "take off your headphones, see what's going on." "Catch Me Now I'm Falling" is a poignant plea from Captain America down on his knees that sadly is as poignant today as it was then. "Pressure" and "National Health" turns the perspective inwards towards dealing with pressure and exercise albeit with great chugging guitar and a can't-help-but-sing-along chorus on "Pressure" and an oddly loopy but catchy beat on "National Health". Next up is "Superman" which literally seems to divide Kinks fans into two camps; love it or see it as the Disco Sellout. Personally I love it and it's the song that hooked me into buying the LP back then and I love the hilarious lyric "I'd like to fly but I can't even swim". As far as rock-meets-disco it's certainly not "Miss You" by the Stones but I've certainly heard worse!
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Format: Audio CD
The Kinks were enjoying a second wind once signing with Arista in the mid-1970s after some spotty recordings earlier in the decade. "Sleepwalker" (1977) and "Misfits" (1978) showed the band getting tighter and stronger and the material Ray Davies was writing was approaching some of his best, but nothing could prepare fans for "Low Budget". True to the title the Kinks were at their most stripped down, spontaneous and playful in years. With punk on the ascent Ray Davies figured if you can't join 'em, beat 'em and delivered some of his brashest songs in years. Ostensibly an album about the USA it's Ray at his observational best with songs focusing on relations both personal and global.
The opening blast of "Attitude" really sets the stage as Dave cranks up his guitar and Ray lets rip with a stinging critique on a deserving fool with the wrong mindset. By the end things settle down and Ray is encouraging us all to "take off your headphones, see what's going on." "Catch Me Now I'm Falling" is a poignant plea from Captain America down on his knees that sadly is as poignant today as it was then. "Pressure" and "National Health" turns the perspective inwards towards dealing with pressure and exercise albeit with great chugging guitar and a can't-help-but-sing-along chorus on "Pressure" and an oddly loopy but catchy beat on "National Health". Next up is "Superman" which literally seems to divide Kinks fans into two camps; love it or see it as the Disco Sellout. Personally I love it and it's the song that hooked me into buying the LP back then and I love the hilarious lyric "I'd like to fly but I can't even swim". As far as rock-meets-disco it's certainly not "Miss You" by the Stones but I've certainly heard worse!
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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Format: Audio CD
The Kinks were enjoying a second wind once signing with Arista in the mid-1970s after some spotty recordings earlier in the decade. "Sleepwalker" (1977) and "Misfits" (1978) showed the band getting tighter and stronger and the material Ray Davies was writing was approaching some of his best, but nothing could prepare fans for "Low Budget". True to the title the Kinks were at their most stripped down, spontaneous and playful in years. With punk on the ascent Ray Davies figured if you can't join 'em, beat 'em and delivered some of his brashest songs in years. Ostensibly an album about the USA it's Ray at his observational best with songs focusing on relations both personal and global.
The opening blast of "Attitude" really sets the stage as Dave cranks up his guitar and Ray lets rip with a stinging critique on a deserving fool with the wrong mindset. By the end things settle down and Ray is encouraging us all to "take off your headphones, see what's going on." "Catch Me Now I'm Falling" is a poignant plea from Captain America down on his knees that sadly is as poignant today as it was then. "Pressure" and "National Health" turns the perspective inwards towards dealing with pressure and exercise albeit with great chugging guitar and a can't-help-but-sing-along chorus on "Pressure" and an oddly loopy but catchy beat on "National Health". Next up is "Superman" which literally seems to divide Kinks fans into two camps; love it or see it as the Disco Sellout. Personally I love it and it's the song that hooked me into buying the LP back then and I love the hilarious lyric "I'd like to fly but I can't even swim". As far as rock-meets-disco it's certainly not "Miss You" by the Stones but I've certainly heard worse!
Read more ›
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