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Lullaby Town [Abridged, Audiobook] [Audio Cassette]

Robert Crais , James Daniels
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Dec 10 2002 Elvis Cole/Joe Pike Series (Book 3)
Hollywood's newest wunderkind is Peter Alan Nelson, the brilliant, erratic director known as the King of Adventure. His films make billions, but his manners make enemies. What the boy king wants, he gets, and what Nelson wants is for Elvis Cole to comb the country for the airhead wife and infant child the film-school flunkout dumped en route to becoming the third biggest filmmaker in America. It's the kind of case Cole can handle in his sleep - until it turns out to be a nightmare. For when Cole finds Nelson's wife in a small Conneticut town, she's nothing like what he expects. The lady has some unwanted - and very nasty - mob connections, which means Elvis could be opening the East Coast branch of his P.I. office . . . at the bottom of the Hudson River.

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From Kirkus Reviews

Lullaby Town is Chelam, Connecticut, where L.A. shamus Elvis Cole (The Monkey's Raincoat, 1987--not reviewed) goes in search of Karen Shipley, divorced ten years earlier by boyish filmmaker Peter Alan Nelsen, who's since developed deep pockets (courtesy of a string of action hits beginning with Chainsaw) and a conscience of sorts. Just when it looks like Elvis has found Karen and her son, Toby, all too easily, Karen turns out to be laundering money for the Mafia, and the story takes off like a two-stage rocket. It'll take all of Elvis's wise-guy savvy to pry Karen loose from those other wise-guys without condemning her to the witness-protection program or the East River. Elvis is as sharp as a West Coast Spenser, but without Spenser's nasty/noble attitudinizing--and this story is pure pleasure from the very first page. -- Copyright ©1992, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

Hollywood's newest wunderkind is Peter Alan Nelson, the brilliant, erratic director known as the King of Adventure. His films make billions, but his manners make enemies. What the boy king wants, he gets, and what Nelson wants is for Elvis to comb the country for the airhead wife and infant child the film-school flunkout dumped en route to becoming the third biggest filmmaker in America. It's the kind of case Cole can handle in his sleep -- until it turns out to be a nightmare. For when Cole finds Nelson's wife in a small Conneticut town, she's nothing like what he expects. The lady has some unwanted -- and very nasty -- mob connections, which means Elvis could be opening the East Coast branch of his P.I. office . . .at the bottom of the Hudson River. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars very entertaining Dec 26 2013
By lynnie
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I have read several of Robert crais s books . the Elvis cole character is interesting.

good read fora lazy day.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Fast-paced fun! Jan. 23 2004
Format:Paperback
The comparisons to Spencer are obvious. Even the storyline here is familiar. But despite all that, the book is a fun, fast-paced, enjoyable crime novel. Cole is an easy-to-like wisecracking hero with a heart of gold. Pike is the cold, matter of fact, partner that you can always rely on. In this novel, Cole and Pike are hired by an egotistical and pompous movie director to locate his ex-wife and son. Finding her isn't much trouble, but then Cole decides to help her and learns that she is in a terrible predicament. Cole and Pike eventually run into the NY mob, and from there the story blisters towards a satisfying (and very violent) conclusion. I highly recommend this for fans of the hard-boiled PI genre.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Eminently Fun Sept. 2 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Robert Crais does it again. Elvis Cole does it again. Joe Pike: ditto. It's difficult not to get hooked by this series. Elvis is funnier than Fletch and Pike is basically what Dale Gribble from "King of the Hill" would be if he wasn't a complete [baby]. Sure, the plot is similar: woman in jeopardy, child in jeopardy. But the chapters fly by. It's LA, and things can get rough, and, heck, Cole even lives near Connelly's Bosch (look on a map)... but this is an LA where Peter Pan still has a chance and everbody is kung-fu fighting.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hollywood Meets the Real World May 15 2003
By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
If you have yet to begin the marvelous Elvis Cole series by Robert Crais, you've got a great treat ahead of you! Few series get off to a stronger start than Mr. Crais did with The Monkey's Raincoat, which won both the Anthony and Macavity awards for best novel while being nominated for the Edgar and Shamus awards as well. Stalking the Angel followed powerfully with classic noir style of the 1930s hard-boiled detective up against evil, but moderated with wise cracks. And the books just keep getting better from there in their characterizations, action, story-telling and excitement.
Elvis Cole is the star attraction, the co-owner of The Elvis Cole Detective Agency. He's now 38, ex-Army, served in Vietnam, ex-security guard, has two years of college, learned to be a detective by working under George Feider, a licensed P.I. for over 40 years, does martial arts as enthusiastically as most people do lunch, and is fearless but not foolish. He's out to right the wrongs of the world as much as he is to earn a living. Elvis has a thing for Disney characters (including a Pinocchio clock), kids, cats, scared clients and rapid fire repartee. He drives a Jamaica yellow 1966 Corvette Stingray convertible, and usually carries a .38 Special Dan Wesson.
His main foil is partner, Joe Pike, an ex-Marine, ex-cop who moves quietly and mysteriously wearing shades even in the dark . . . when he's not scaring the bad guys with the red arrows tattooed on his deltoids, which are usually bare in sleeveless shirts. Although he's got an office with Elvis, Pike spends all of his time at his gun shop when not routing the bad guys with martial arts while carrying and often using enough firepower to stop a tank. Pike rarely speaks . . . and never smiles.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Elvis Spenser? March 3 2003
By T. King
Format:Paperback
I see from other reviews that I am not the first to notice the similarities between Cole and Spenser. Lullaby Town is the third in the Cole series and the third one I've read, I'm a stickler that way, and it bears the strongest resemblence yet to Parker's Boston PI.
Not to say this is a bad thing. While I am a longtime Spenser fan I'm sorry to say that the series is beginning to lose it's zip. Enter Crais. Although there is strong evidence that he is Parker influenced, he gives Cole and Pike the gusto that Spenser and Hawk used to have.
I highly recommend the Cole series, at least the one's I have read, they make a great addition to any mystery/PI lovers library. I look forward to reading the next one.
Note to Parker fans: Try the Jesse Stone series. Very fresh and very original.
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4.0 out of 5 stars "There's a quaint little place..." Dec 24 2002
Format:Paperback
Most detectives would give their eyeteeth to be hired by a director as famous as Peter Alan Nelson, the king of the adventure movie. Admittedly, the job was only one of finding Nelson's ex-wife and child who he hasn't seen in eleven years. Suddenly, after dumping them for a film career Nelson feels a gap in his life which he intends to plug with Toby, his son, like it or not. Nelson likes Elvis Cole because the detective is macho and has lots of attitude. You can imagine what Cole actually thought, but sometimes money is money.
Cole finds out that Nelson's wife is far from the loser that the director thought she was. He finds Karen Lloyd in Chelam, Connecticut. The failed actress has become a bank vice-president, raising her son on her own and doing well. Not as well as she should be, though. In the hard days, she did a favor for the mafia and now she's in Charlie DeLuca's back pocket. Since Charlie is the son of the Capo and a complete psychotic, this is not a good place to be. No problem, Elvis Cole and Joe Pike to the rescue.
By now, the reader should know that Pike/Cole solutions inevitably involve a surfeit of chaos and violence. This time is no exception. Cole has to worry about Toby, the mafia (several mafias), Peter Alan Nelson (who never behaves as if he is as old as Toby), and a steady flow of crazies. Something a lot worse than a little money laundering is going on and Cole is stuck right in the middle of it. Being Robert Crais' answer to the tired old archetype of the Los Angeles private investigator, you can trust Cole to smiles, cracks sarcastic jokes, play hero, and wait until you're not looking before he hits you up side of the head with a cast iron two-by-four.
This book, the third in the series, drags just a bit.
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Most recent customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Lullaby Town
Lullaby Town is Chelam, Connecticut, where L.A. shamus Elvis Cole (The Monkey's Raincoat, 1987--not reviewed) goes in search of Karen Shipley, divorced ten years earlier by boyish... Read more
Published on Aug. 21 2002
4.0 out of 5 stars Elvis Does New York
Foregoing his familiar LA turf, Robert Crais ventures to New York City and the sleepy Connecticut suburb of Chelam in this offbeat and entertaining mystery. Read more
Published on June 11 2002 by Gary Griffiths
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Terrific Yarn
Once again Crais weaves a brilliant yarn. This one had fewer wisecracks than others, but it sped along on a good tight story line. If you are not familiar with Mr. Read more
Published on April 24 2002 by "rammoose"
3.0 out of 5 stars Not Quite as Good
I didn't like this book quite as much as the other Elvis Cole books I have read, Monkey's Raincoat, Freefall, and LA Requiem. Read more
Published on March 19 2002 by Jason K. Terry
4.0 out of 5 stars Pacy and entertaining
Private detective Elvis Cole is hired by Peter Alan Nelsen, a brilliant, erratic and arrogant movie producer to find his son whom he hasn't seen since deserting him and his mother... Read more
Published on March 5 2002 by Beverley Strong
3.0 out of 5 stars More one sided characters than an Arnold flick!
A pompous director comes to Elvis Cole's office searching for his estranged wife and kid. Elvis, with his usual cool sarcastic reception, reluctantly takes the assignment and... Read more
Published on Feb. 17 2002 by sporkdude
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the better Elvis Cole novels
Twelve years ago, Karen Shipley was seventeen years old and had dreams of becoming a movie star. She married a struggling film director and had a son with him. Read more
Published on Feb. 14 2002 by Angel L. Soto
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