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MacroWikinomics Hardcover – Sep 28 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 424 pages
  • Publisher: Portfolio Penguin; 1st Edition edition (Sept. 28 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670065161
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670065165
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 15.7 x 3.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 658 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #142,677 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ian Robertson TOP 100 REVIEWER on Jan. 26 2011
Format: Hardcover
Forward thinking authors Tapscott and Williams take readers on a world tour of events, innovations and changes inspired by our newly interconnected lives. Some of the examples will be familiar (e.g. most of the media ones), others will have readers scurrying to the internet to learn more, and all are used to paint an optimistic view of the future. The book's charm and its weakness is that the authors are unabashed cheerleaders for the potential unleashed by the internet, and their prognostications are as much based on hope as on analysis. Fortunately, readers could ask for no better guides than Tapscott and Williams. A quick, easy, edifying and thought provoking read, with only a slight reality check in the last dozen pages with respect to the potentially negative aspects of connectivity.

The book starts with 'five principals for the age of networked intelligence': collaboration, openness, sharing, integrity, and interdependence, and uses those as a base to examine the changes they have brought and might further bring to media, science, health care, government, climate change, and finance. The book is strong as a whole, but suffers from three weaknesses.

First, some of the conclusions are curious, for example newspapers' demise are deemed inevitable because news has become a commodity and distribution is no longer relevant. This may be true, but music companies' - who face very similar issues - are singled out for a different fate in that they merely need to adapt to on-line streaming to face their challenges. The authors seem to miss the possibility of artists connecting directly with their audience via the internet, bypassing music companies' distribution platforms altogether.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ian Gordon Malcomson HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Jan. 23 2013
Format: Paperback
Continuing to play the role of innovative thinkers and visionaries in their latest book, Tapscott and Williams believe that America must adopt a more collaborative approach to resolving its deepening economic crisis. This study is a very astute and intelligent attempt at showing how trust can be restored on many different fronts when people come together on a large scale with a common purpose of sharing big ideas for the benefit of all. The qualities to make this ideal world happen are found in our ability to allow new ideas to surface to challenge Corporate America's grip on things. By encouraging the `little guys' to form networks through the Internet for the purpose of exchanging information, new companies are emerging that produce more efficient forms of energy, cheaper forms of communication, and more reliable services. The planet's problems are too great to be left in the hands of corporate moguls who have a blighted history of getting it wrong more times than not. To prove the point that this vision is not just a lot of pie-in-the-sky, Tapscott and Williams look at a number of fields where future intellectual collaboration is critical for the effective harnessing of knowledge in the pursuit of economic development that benefits more than just the few. Healthcare, education, finance, government regulatory control, globalization, patents, intellectual property, mass media, and entertainment are all areas that are slowly yielding to the power of the Internet to bring people together in the hopes of shaping a better world. This book is full of illustrations as to how people are already starting to become better watchdogs of government and industry, how news can be more easily accessed, and how individuals are becoming more aware of rights and responsibilities.Read more ›
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Robert Morris HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Oct. 18 2010
Format: Hardcover
Those who have read Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything (2008) already know this about Don Tapscott and Anthony Williams: they favor the "open" organizational model based on three basic principles: transparency, inclusiveness, and collaboration. Refinements of that model can (and often do) reflect the influence of Charles Darwin (e.g. the concept of a process of natural selection) and Joseph Schumpeter (e.g. the concept of creative destruction). Those who wish to learn more about the model itself are urged to check out two books by Henry Chesbrough, Open Innovation and pen Business Models.

What differentiates this book from its predecessor? Tapscott and Williams have extended their scope, as indicated in this passage when they observe that "a powerful new form of economic and social innovation" is sweeping across all sectors and, indeed, all continents, "one where people with drive, passion, and expertise take advantage of new Web-based tools to get more involved in making the world more prosperous, just, and sustainable." In a phrase, "global wikinomics." That is to say, Tapscott and Williams have extended the scope and depth of mass collaboration to include any/all social networks that agree to be connected and interactive.

A agree with them that there is indeed an "historic opportunity to marshal human skill, ingenuity, and intelligence on a mass scale to reevaluate and reposition many of our institutions for the coming decades and for future generations." This will require massive and - here's the greatest challenge - simultaneous collaborative transformation of all traditional institutions (e.g. social, political, educational, and financial).
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