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Making Wild Wines & Meads: 125 Unusual Recipes Using Herbs, Fruits, Flowers & More Paperback – Jan 8 1999


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Making Wild Wines & Meads: 125 Unusual Recipes Using Herbs, Fruits, Flowers & More + The Compleat Meadmaker: Home Production of Honey Wine From Your First Batch to Award-winning Fruit and Herb Variations + Making Your Own Mead: 43 Recipes for Homemade Honey Wines
Price For All Three: CDN$ 43.56

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Storey Publishing, LLC; Revised edition edition (Jan. 8 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1580171826
  • ISBN-13: 978-1580171823
  • Product Dimensions: 23.2 x 15.4 x 1.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 136 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #80,277 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mnara on Jan. 11 2010
Format: Paperback
When my partner and I bought this book, we were starting our first batch of wine from the fruit trees on our new property. We hoped that this book would help us explore our options beyond just the grape. And that it did! This book has a wonderful selection of recipes from fruit, veggies, and even herbs. We learned about what meads and melomels were, and we were certainly inspired by the unique combinations offered in the book. My personal favorites:
-strawberry rubarb wine
-rosehip wine
-spiced beet wine
-parsnip wine
-pea pod wine
-tomato wine
-potato wine
-lemon-thyme metheglin
-sack mead

However, I would not recommend this book to a beginner. While the pages are laid our clear and simple, the instructions were not detailed enough for my partner and I. With the help of another book we were able to use recipes in this book to have success in wine making, but I found this book was not instructional enough for all our needs and questions.

Another strange aspect of the book was that all the recipes are for 3.8 L "jugs" rather than the typical 19 to 57 L carboy. We ended up doing a lot of math with this book, because we had to convert all the measurements to the standard wine making equipment we had purchased.

While I think this book will be a great tool for the future as we learn more about wine making, I would not suggest it for beginners. BUT, if you're experienced and eager to experiment, this book is for you!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 18 2000
Format: Paperback
From the novice vinter to a more experienced hand, this book is one of the better ones I have seen. At the start, the author describes and explains the homewine-making process, the equiptment necessary, the "lingo", and gives a desent time-line for completion. The recipies are usually simple and are for one-gallon batches. Some are a little weird, but it does say "unusual" in the title. A definate recommendation for anyone who is avidly homebrewing wine or mead.
Wassail!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By James on May 13 2004
Format: Paperback
Very Very little in this boon on the how-to of wine making but if you're an experienced wine maker and you're looking for a recipe book for mead and wine this is the one to get. Tons of stuff.
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By Joe on April 20 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good book with lots of helpful tips on how to make wines/meads, made me more confident in trying for the first time.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 38 reviews
47 of 48 people found the following review helpful
Making Wild Wines & Meads: 125 Unusual Recipies Using Herbs, April 18 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
From the novice vinter to a more experienced hand, this book is one of the better ones I have seen. At the start, the author describes and explains the homewine-making process, the equiptment necessary, the "lingo", and gives a desent time-line for completion. The recipies are usually simple and are for one-gallon batches. Some are a little weird, but it does say "unusual" in the title. A definate recommendation for anyone who is avidly homebrewing wine or mead.
Wassail!
26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
Finally! Nov. 4 2004
By John Paul - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Many years ago when I started making my own wine, I had receipes for fruit wines including Pineapple, Strawberry and even a Strawberry/Vanilla wine. I lost that small book and went without for many years. If you have any interest in making fruit and herb wines (They Make Great Gifts!) then try this book. It will keep you busy for quite some time.
33 of 36 people found the following review helpful
Not very wild Aug. 26 2010
By countrydreamer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The title suggest "wild recipes" and I thought that recipes would be presented which you can make mainly with wild or backyard ingredients, maybe even using wild yeasts. Instead it is a pretty usual wine making book. Nearly all recipes ask for fruit juice concentrate, even for very unusual concentrates. I have no idea where to get these concentrates, certainly not in the next supermarket.
For this reason, I think that the title is very misleading as it suggests real "back to the basic" recipes.
22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
Inspiring but some details are missing Dec 14 2004
By Lisa - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I got this book for my first winemaking book, and used one of

the blackberry wine recipes for my first batch. The recipes

are just recipes, without the minute detail, and it was hard

to turn back and forth from the recipes to the 'how to' intro

to get the general detailed steps, and there were a couple of

steps that I wasn't sure exactly what to do. Also, there are

tips I could have used, for example the siphoning; the book

makes it sound simple but it was very frustrating, and there

are tools available to start the siphon that I hope will be

very useful.

The book is very inspiring and the recipes are diverse and

interesting, I expect to use it again.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
A basic overview with a couple of neat twists Dec 29 2008
By Sterlingspider - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I'm going to break my review of this book into two components, the instructions (which gets a 3) and the recipe section (which gets a 5).

Instructions:
Simple and straightforward, this would be a great book for someone starting out in the hobby (though probably not as a first and only book on the subject). As far as the instructions are concerned I would recommend this to anyone who has read a more detailed book on home brewing and maybe felt a little overwhelmed, but who isn't ready to give up on it. The directions are stolid, basic, "tried and true" instructions with a few procedural options thrown in, but not enough to overwhelm (and believe me, brewing can get AWFULLY overwhelming). If you're old hat at home brewing don't expect any mystical revelations, but it is probably worth taking a skim-through to get a feel for the author's intentions.

The section on sterilization was unexpectedly thin. Considering all the items they recommend you get from a brew supply already, household bleach should not be the focus of the sterilization section.

Recipes:
This is where for me this book shines. The recipes take up about 2/3 of the book and range everywhere from the tried and true classics (grape, peach, strawberry, honey) to the really outré (beet wine anyone? how about snap pea? or crabapple?). For an experienced brewer with a few books under their belt there might not be so many forays into the "wild" as the title might suggest, but the recipe list would look pretty out-there to someone primarily used to grape table wines.

There are variations of most of the wines to account for different tastes without filling half the book with tiny alterations of the same recipe. They provide both a sweet and dry variation of many recipes, and several include versions which account for different varieties of the same fruit or levels of ripeness. There is a separate mead section but many of the wines also use honey as the main sugar additive, so there's a lot of opportunity for experimentation if that is an interest of yours.

Some brew science is still a bit deeper then I'm personally interested in going right now, and sometimes it's awfully nice to be able follow a pre-tested recipe to approximate the results I'm looking for rather then having to calculate every single additive based on tables and graphs. I think that alone will keep this book near the top of my reference pile for this hobby.

Yield for each of these recipes is one gallon, which is a nice economical size for testing out something. The cost of fresh fruit and honey can add up fast, and in the worst case scenario it can be no fun having to get rid of five gallons of something that turned out badly after what could even be several years of work and patience. While authors assume sulfiting as a baseline procedure, they continually remind that this is optional and do discuss the necessary preparation differences in each recipe. This is highly appreciated for those of us who prefer not to use sulfites.

In the end I still think the best judge of an instructional book is if reading it makes me start a mental wish-list of what to buy the next time I play with that specific hobby, and I've already started working out the contents of my next brew-store order.

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