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Man on the Moon (Widescreen)


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Man on the Moon (Widescreen) + Me, Myself & Irene (Special Edition) (Bilingual)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Diane Lane, Viggo Mortensen, Liev Schreiber, Anna Paquin, Tovah Feldshuh
  • Directors: Tony Goldwyn
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, DTS Surround Sound, DVD-Video, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Dubbed: French
  • Subtitles for the Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Universal Studios Home Entertainment
  • Release Date: April 12 2005
  • Run Time: 118 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (141 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00003CWTL
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #9,702 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Product Description

Carrey/Devito/Love ~ Man On The Moon

Amazon.ca

"There is no real you," jokes Lynn Margulies (Courtney Love) to her boyfriend, Andy Kaufman (Jim Carrey), as he grows more contemplative during a battle with cancer. "I forgot," he says, playing along, though the question of Kaufman's reality is always at issue in Milos Forman's underappreciated Man on the Moon.

The story of Kaufman's quick rise to fame through early appearances on Saturday Night Live and the conceptual stunts that made his club and concert appearances an instant legend in the irony-fueled 1970s and early '80s, Man on the Moon never makes the mistake of artificially delineating Comic Andy from Private Andy. True, we get to see something of his private interest in meditation and some of the flakier extremes of alternative medicine, but even these interludes suggest the presence of an ultimate con behind apparent miracles of transformation.

Screenwriters Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski (The People vs. Larry Flynt) allege that transformation was Kaufman's purpose--more than a shtick but less than a destiny. As we see him constantly up the ante on the credibility of his performance personae (the obnoxious nightclub comic Tony Clifton; the insulting, misogynistic professional wrestler), Forman makes it harder and harder to detect Kaufman's sleight of hand. But it's there, always there, always the transcendent Andy watching the havoc he creates and the emotions he stirs.

Carrey is magnificent as Kaufman, re-creating uncannily detailed comedy pieces etched in the memory of anyone who remembers the real Andy. But while Carrey's mimicry of Kaufman is flawless and funny, the actor probes much deeper into an enigmatic character who, in life, was often a moving target even for those closest to him. --Tom Keogh


Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By David G. Smith on April 15 2004
Format: DVD
My favorite Kaufman routine is one in which he is in a club and he is being heckled by a guy. The guys says "You suck, Kaufman" and Kaufman gives some line back to him. Kaufman takes care of the heckler, classic comedian style. And then the heckler days "yOU'RE NOT FUNNY, kAUFMAN. tHE TRUTH IS, YOU PAID ME TO DO THIS...Am I right? Am I right Kaufman, didn't you pay me...to heckle you? So you would look good, huh?" And this bit goes on for an uncomfortable amount of time. Kaufman seemed to be about layers of uncomfortability...about making the audience feel something other than laughs..
Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski are fun screenwriters, (though I am not sure they are still working) having produced script for Larry Flynt and Ed Wood....they are not always concerned with tradition, and find great hools in telling the story. They then seem like the perfect choice for writing the story of Andy Kaufman, the most non traditional of performers...and certainly the first five minutes of the film does not dissapoint...Kaufman(Jim Carrey) stands in a movie screen, tells everybody it is his movie and the weirdness ensues.
Ok.
Well, then the next two hours never captures this same kind of "what is real?" feeling. I mean, don't get me wrong. I enjoyed this movie, and Carrey does an amazing job of recreating Kaufman onstage...but I thought there were a few problems...one is that no one knew Kaufman that well, and therefore it is almost impossible to create a bio pic for someone you can't actually identify with. Therefore we are saddled with forties bio cliches" I Want to Be The greatest of all times" and the fantastic"I want To Play Carnegie Hall", and the obligatory "guy finds cyst on his neck".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Patricia R. Andersen on Jan. 31 2004
Format: VHS Tape
I was a fan of Andy Kaufman until he started the women wrestling schtick. I, of course, did not realize his remarks and his wrestling were all a put-on by this master con man until much later. By then, it was much too late and he had already died from cancer.
You won't really learn much about Andy Kaufman from this movie - bits and pieces, but from the look of his life, no one really knew a lot about him. You never are told why his dad is so upset Andy is playing in his room by himself. You never get a grasp of what made Andy Kaufman constantly invent characters that people even loved or hated. His "Latka" character was brillant as well as funny. His "Tony" character was the portrait of an obnoxious lounge singer. He appeared to use everybody and everything as a huge prop to complete practical jokes. This may have been gunny to Andy, but lots of times, he was the only one who got the joke.
Jim Carrey is fantastic as Andy Kaufman. Seeing Carrey do the "Mighty Mouse" bit brought me back to the first time I seen the bit - fearing that Kaufman had simply became a victim of stage fright and than laughing as he pantomined the "Mighty Mouse" song.
Andy Kaufman was a complex and troubled man. He seemed determined to elicit extreme reactions from people, good or bad were the same to him. Just provoking the reaction was what he seemed to crave.
I have to admit, I still don't understand Andy Kaufman and I still am not a big fan of his, but the movie was very thought provoking. On one hand, he is seen meditating, trying to become a more spiritual person - on the other hand he is seen being a total jerk to his co-workers for no apparent reason or at least no reason that is elaborated on in the movie. If you want a look at a complex performer, I recommend this movie highly.
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By Greg Curtis on Dec 12 2008
Format: DVD
Man on the Moon, the story of Andy Kaufman, is a fascinating film about one of the most bizarre comedians of the 1980's. As played by Jim Carrey in an eerily faithful interpretation, we learn that Kaufman and his writing partner, Bob Zmuda, were more interested in making themselves laugh by dreaming up new ways to irritate and shock people.

True, Andy Kaufman's persona was so peculiar that many people may avoid the film entirely, but Jim Carrey's portrayal is not to be missed. While his performance in The Truman Show was hardly a stretch and highly overrated, not awarding him an Oscar this time around will be the biggest misdeed since Henry Fonda lost out for The Grapes of Wrath.

As the film traces Kaufman's rather quick rise to fame, the script weaves together a series of vignettes depicting his antics on Saturday Night Live, the Merv Griffin Show and David Letterman.

But Kaufman is best known for the five seasons he starred on Taxi, playing foreign man-boy Latka Gravas. Although he hated sitcoms, calling them "the lowest form of entertainment", it was a role Andy reluctantly accepted when created specifically for him. These sequences feature members of the show's original cast (minus Tony Danza), playing themselves 20 years ago.

Former Taxi castmate Danny DeVito, however, instead plays a major role as Kaufman's agent, and the always compelling Courtney Love is rather wasted in the film's second half as Andy's girlfriend. In other inspired casting, viewers will notice a virtual plethora of familiar character actors and television personalities from the past and present.
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