Maneuvers and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
or
Amazon Prime Free Trial required. Sign up when you check out. Learn More
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading Maneuvers on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Maneuvers: The International Politics of Militarizing Women's Lives [Paperback]

Cynthia Enloe
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
List Price: CDN$ 33.22
Price: CDN$ 30.88 & FREE Shipping. Details
You Save: CDN$ 2.34 (7%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Want it delivered Wednesday, September 3? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition CDN $17.23  
Paperback CDN $30.88  
Save Up to 90% on Textbooks
Hit the books in Amazon.ca's Textbook Store and save up to 90% on used textbooks and 35% on new textbooks. Learn more.
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

Feb. 1 2000
Maneuvers takes readers on a global tour of the sprawling process called "militarization." With her incisive verve and moxie, eminent feminist Cynthia Enloe shows that the people who become militarized are not just the obvious ones—executives and factory floor workers who make fighter planes, land mines, and intercontinental missiles. They are also the employees of food companies, toy companies, clothing companies, film studios, stock brokerages, and advertising agencies. Militarization is never gender-neutral, Enloe claims: It is a personal and political transformation that relies on ideas about femininity and masculinity. Films that equate action with war, condoms that are designed with a camouflage pattern, fashions that celebrate brass buttons and epaulettes, tomato soup that contains pasta shaped like Star Wars weapons—all of these contribute to militaristic values that mold our culture in both war and peace.

Presenting new and groundbreaking material that builds on Enloe's acclaimed work in Does Khaki Become You? and Bananas, Beaches, and Bases, Maneuvers takes an international look at the politics of masculinity, nationalism, and globalization. Enloe ranges widely from Japan to Korea, Serbia, Kosovo, Rwanda, Britain, Israel, the United States, and many points in between. She covers a broad variety of subjects: gays in the military, the history of "camp followers," the politics of women who have sexually serviced male soldiers, married life in the military, military nurses, and the recruitment of women into the military. One chapter titled "When Soldiers Rape" explores the many facets of the issue in countries such as Chile, the Philippines, Okinawa, Rwanda, and the United States.

Enloe outlines the dilemmas feminists around the globe face in trying to craft theories and strategies that support militarized women, locally and internationally, without unwittingly being militarized themselves. She explores the complicated militarized experiences of women as prostitutes, as rape victims, as mothers, as wives, as nurses, and as feminist activists, and she uncovers the "maneuvers" that military officials and their civilian supporters have made in order to ensure that each of these groups of women feel special and separate.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

From Kirkus Reviews

paper 0-520-22071-4 A wide-ranging look at the global militarization of women's lives, whether they are soldiers or spouses of men serving in countries from Bosnia to Indonesia. Enloe (Government/Clark Univ.; The Morning After, 1993), a feminist who believes the military is a patriarchal entity intent on masculinizing society, often undercuts the point of her argument in scattershot attacks on her targets. And while she has a case to make, her bias shows. She assumes that the military, if not malign, is certainly suspect, and she never considers why wars are fought or whether any wars are just. Rather, she concentrates on describing the patriarchy at work fostering militarized masculine values, as it not only conducts wars but manages peace. She defines militarization as ``a specific sort of transforming process but the list of what can be militarized is virtually endless: toys, jobs, the profession of psychology, fashion, faith, voting, local economies, condoms, and movie starsthe latter because they are co-opted to perform for troops and sustain morale. In her most persuasive chapter, she notes how various militaries have required medical examinations for prostitutes and condoned off-base prostitution or, more notoriously, as the Japanese army did with the ``comfort women, seized women from conquered countries to serve the army's needs. Citing documents and examples from numerous countries, Enloe describes the evolving role of military wives, and the military's handling of rape, which is, she contends, part of its strategy in Bosnia and Serbia. She believes that female soldiers, mothers of soldiers, and nurses, who are used to maintain ``the patriarchal multilayered arrangements of masculinities and femininities,'' too often accept a patriarchal agenda that keeps them powerless and alienated. Enloes graceless writing fuzzes all but her most telling points, and her assertions, though bold, are not always sufficiently discussed or convincingly demonstrated. -- Copyright ©1999, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Demonstrate[s] with particular sensitivity and insight how core political institutions shape women's identities and interests. . . Beautifully written, in a lively, accessible manner, [MANEUVERS] teach[es] students that it is possible to combine rigorous, hard-hitting analysis with compassion and engagement."--"Women's Review of Books

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
For several years I kept a can of Heinz tomato and noodle soup on the kitchen counter. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

5 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Important feminist study on militarisation Oct. 13 2000
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Cynthia Enloe adds to her series of writings looking at the effects of militarisation on women's lives - from the laundresses, camp followers, comfort women and sex workers to feminist military personnel and those who fight the home front.
Like Jan Jindy Pettman's "Worlding Women - a feminist international politics", Enloe's latest book seeks to look at international relations from a gendered perspective - and succeeds admirably.
The author relies a lot on secondary sources (citing a lot of newspaper stories), but weaves together the strands of militarisation on women's lives in a compelling and readable style. The book is full of fascinating anecdotes that illustrate the broader themes of the multifacted impact of contemporary militarisation (I particularly enjoyed the discussion on why British military officers from all services and US Air Force and Navy officers are allowed to carry umbrellas, but they are fobidden as too girlie for the US Marines and US Army! )
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Important feminist study on militarisation Oct. 13 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Cynthia Enloe adds to her series of writings looking at the effects of militarisation on women's lives - from the laundresses, camp followers, comfort women and sex workers to feminist military personnel and those who fight the home front.
Like Jan Jindy Pettman's "Worlding Women - a feminist international politics", Enloe's latest book seeks to look at international relations from a gendered perspective - and succeeds admirably.
The author relies a lot on secondary sources (citing a lot of newspaper stories), but weaves together the strands of militarisation on women's lives in a compelling and readable style. The book is full of fascinating anecdotes that illustrate the broader themes of the multifacted impact of contemporary militarisation (I particularly enjoyed the discussion on why British military officers from all services and US Air Force and Navy officers are allowed to carry umbrellas, but they are fobidden as too girlie for the US Marines and US Army! )
5.0 out of 5 stars Thoughtful and Thought Provoking March 3 2014
By D. Polk - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is a great book... one of my favorites. Judging by the other comments, it may be somewhat unpopular to take an antiwar stance when there's plenty of lobbying occurring to get women IN the military. However Enloe addresses this point eloquently when she explains that "feminism" can support the military industrial complex when it is used to support such structures as, well, the military itself.
6 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Could Be Much Better March 12 2008
By James Burns - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Dr. Enloe's work is a frenetically paced tour of the seedy gendered underside of militarization throughout the world. While she raises good questions concerning the effects of militarization on women throughout the world, too often her work displays an unfamiliarity with the military facts that she uses to bolster her arguments. These factual inaccuracies and omissions, e.g. overstating the casualties at Gettysburg and in the Vietnam war by a factor of ten or the omission of the fact that the JROTC is completely voluntary, discredit otherwise valuable perspectives on the less-publicized effects of the growth of the national security state.
Secondly, the assumptions that the author makes are based primarily on secondary sources. It is obvious that she has not spent much, if any, time observing first hand the gender dynamics that play themselves out in military units. Instead, Dr. Enloe constantly shifts between levels of analysis in an attempt to prove her points. This theoretical instability makes it difficult for the reader to connect the evidence that is used to support the author's conclusions.
Lastly, in one of her other works, Dr. Enloe asks the question "Where are the women?" In this work, she fails to follow up on her scant observations concerning the differences that exist among, for example, the branches of the US military. Instead, the different services are alternately treated as separate organizational cultures or as a single military monolith depending on the point that she is trying to make. This is the books greatest folly. It is absurd to assume that an organization as large as the US military speaks, acts, and thinks with one mind. More research and observation of military units would show that the differences between branches is only the starting point in the analysis of military organizational culture with respect to gender analysis. There are a myriad of divisions even within particular services, such as the difference between all male combat arms units on the one hand, and combat support and combat service support units on the other, just to name one.
All of these factors combine to demonstrate an unfamiliarity with the inner workings of militaries which undermines the credibility of Dr. Enloe's arguments and which prove to be the biggest failure of this particular book. I would recommend her book, "Bananas, Beaches, and Bases" for a more coherent statement of feminist ideas concerning international relations.
10 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The true "feminist agenda" Dec 31 2000
By Chapulina R - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Cynthia Enloe is the author most quoted by opponants of women in the armed forces, because she presents the real Feminist viewpoint, which is staunchly anti-war and ambivelant toward the military. Enloe's arguments, supported by N.O.W., are coopted by "anti-feminist" foes of servicewomen as proof of their own contention that women have no place in the military. Paradoxically, after quoting Enloe, those same crusaders then lambast a so-called "feminist lobby" for promoting gender integration in combat operations. No doubt they confuse Feminism with some "politically-correct" positions of Congressional military panels, which are, ironically, often ignored or opposed by N.O.W. But Enloe's books go much further than simply stating Feminism's pacifist ideals. In "Maneuvers", she accuses the military of deliberate victimization of women worldwide. She makes a number of good points concerning the cruelties of war toward civilian women, but her antimilitary bias shows and is sometimes rather venomous. She gives no thought whatsoever to the conditions which make warfare an unpleasant reality and the armed forces a necessity. Nor has she any real concern for American military women or their reasons for wanting to serve. By relating selected incidents of harassment or violence against servicewomen, she presents a negative and mostly false impression of the American military's widespread and willful victimization of its female members. Read "Maneuvers" for the Feminist counter of Brian Mitchell's "Flirting With Disaster", but don't expect balance in the views of either author.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback