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Manhunt Hardcover – Mar 12 1986


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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Random House; 1st Edition edition (March 12 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0394552938
  • ISBN-13: 978-0394552934
  • Product Dimensions: 23.9 x 16 x 3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 726 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,295,420 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Library Journal

If the story of Edwin Wilson, the ex-CIA agent who came to serve Muammar el-Qaddafi as a freewheeling dealer in explosives and the technologies and tactics of terror, were laid before a reader as fiction, it would be rejected as too bizarre, too grotesque, too unbelievable. And yet the story of Wilson, and of his capture and conviction (featured recently on 60 Minutes ), is not only true but also provides food for thoughtas Maas's absorbing but somewhat blandly written account suggestsabout the subterranean role of America's national security agency. Yet, in light of the Watergate-CIA revelations, perhaps the Wilson story is not so strange after all. Fascinating reading for lovers of spy thrillers; recommended for public libraries. Henry Steck, Political Science Dept., SUNY Coll. at Cortland
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc.

About the Author

Peter Maas was the writer of THE VALACHI PAPERS, SERPICO, MARIE:A TRUE STORY, UNDERBOSS:SAMMY THE BULL GAVANO'S STORY OF LIFE IN THE MAFIA, KILLER SPY, and THE TERRIBLE HOURS --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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By A Customer on April 19 2003
Format: Paperback
Maas is a good story teller and he keeps your attention the whole while as he takes you from the beginnings of Wilson's thirst for money at age 8 to his acquisition of prime property in the Washington, D.C. area as a result of his secretive and illegal dealings with foreign powers. Though CIA senior officers were members along with him in phoney corporations he set up to conduct his "import-export" business), any official connection to the CIA while all this was going on isn't clear. Yet the prospect of any CIA connection to Wilson's shipments of thousands of pounds of C-4 (plastique) to Libya and Mohamar Kaddafi is, indeed, very troubling. As the author pointed out, when jets started falling out of the air (Lockerbie) and discos blowing up (Rome), you couldn't help but feel that if not for Wilson, many of these things might not ever have happened. It seems that whereever 20th century evil was to be found, the CIA was either right there, or not too far behind.
This doesn't give you any great insights into the inner workings of the world of spooks, but it is certainly an interesting read and does afford at times a look at how the Justice and State Departments work--or fail to work.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 9 reviews
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
good read April 19 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Maas is a good story teller and he keeps your attention the whole while as he takes you from the beginnings of Wilson's thirst for money at age 8 to his acquisition of prime property in the Washington, D.C. area as a result of his secretive and illegal dealings with foreign powers. Though CIA senior officers were members along with him in phoney corporations he set up to conduct his "import-export" business), any official connection to the CIA while all this was going on isn't clear. Yet the prospect of any CIA connection to Wilson's shipments of thousands of pounds of C-4 (plastique) to Libya and Mohamar Kaddafi is, indeed, very troubling. As the author pointed out, when jets started falling out of the air (Lockerbie) and discos blowing up (Rome), you couldn't help but feel that if not for Wilson, many of these things might not ever have happened. It seems that whereever 20th century evil was to be found, the CIA was either right there, or not too far behind.
This doesn't give you any great insights into the inner workings of the world of spooks, but it is certainly an interesting read and does afford at times a look at how the Justice and State Departments work--or fail to work.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
The Dirty Business of Spying Nov. 28 2009
By Seth Hettena - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Forget James Bond, Peter Maas' Manhunt shows what a dirty business espionage can be.

Edwin P. Wilson sent more than 40,000 pounds of C-4 explosive, firearms, and ex-Green Berets to Muhammar Qaddafi's regime and establishing a terrorist training school in Libya. Those very same explosives were used to support enemies in attacks aimed at the former colonial powers.

Did the CIA know about it? You bet. At his Virginia estate, Wilson hosted Ted Shackley, a legendary spook, and other budding Iran-Contra figures like Thomas Clines and Maj. Gen. Richard Secord.

Wilson was their patsy. The blurb describes him as the Great Gatsby of the spy world, but he really was a dangerous blowhard who remained outside the reach of U.S. law for years with the help of the fortune he amassed selling arms overseas. A dedicated prosecutor, Larry Barcella, and his team of federal agents finally coaxed him out.

Wilson went to prison arguing that he was working for the CIA all along, and after 20 years, he assembled enough evidence to convince a federal judge that he might be telling the truth. A prosecutor named Ted Greenberg had suborned a perjured CIA affidavit denying that Wilson had anything to do with the agency.

What's amazing about Manhunt, published in 1986, is that this isn't much of a surprise to the reader.

Bottom line: Well-written and extremely well reported, Maas' Manhunt should be on the shelf with other nonfiction spy classics like Wilderness of Mirrors.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Detailed suspense Aug. 17 2006
By William D. Tompkins - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The author is a great storyteller and provides an inordinate amount of details concerning the rougue CIA that is being tracked. It really is amazing how Mr. Maas was able to pull this all together in a great read like this.
A Good, Educational Read Aug. 30 2015
By Aaron - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I benefited from this book.

'Manhunt' is a classic of its genre: the profile of an "upstanding citizen" gone wrong. Much can be learned from such cases, on multiple levels and dimensions, and this one in particular does not disappoint. The book offers the reader valuable, substantial insight into the mind and times of a man who, once upon a time, had shown every outward indicator of legitimacy and correctness, only to betray those appearances entirely. The account of Mr. Edward P. Wilson raises so many relevant (and timeless) questions: How does such duplicitous behavior come about? What goes into such a life experience? And, most importantly: Just how common is this scenario in the world, in which we erroneously judge human books by their covers? Good questions, indeed, and 'Manhunt' takes us that much closer, in some small way, to answers. And, to top it all off, we are presented with a good, old-fashioned drama, with a plot and cast of characters straight from a spy novel. From a literary standpoint, I found the book to be easy to read, with a solid, functional narrative that didn't get in the way of the information.

So, a big thank-you to 'Manhunt's' author, subjects, and publisher. I am grateful for your work.
Reading about Qadaffi after he's gone... Dec 3 2012
By puravidalover - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Reading about Qadaffi after he's gone and with the coming of the Arab Spring gives the reader a new perspective on the dictator's regime and those who dealt with him. Edward P. Wilson was, unfortunately, one of those who dealt with him and got rich on million dollar weapons deals tainted with the dictator's blood or the blood of his victims. Maas does a very good job in bringing to the reader the nefarious activities of Wilson against a background of legitimacy as these activities were filled with the involvement of former CIA associates and employees. Wilson finally meets his match in a dedicated US attorney. Maas is certainly very good in retelling the narrative including realistic dialog of the various characters involved.


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