Marx & Satan (1986) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
CDN$ 0.01
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Our books ship from the USA and delivery time is 2 to 3 weeks.  Minimal damage to cover and binding. Pages show light use. With pride from Motor City. All books guaranteed.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Marx & Satan Paperback – Dec 1986


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 33.95 CDN$ 0.01

Summer Clearance on Books Books That Make You Think




July 15th is Prime Day

Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Living Sacrifice Book Co (December 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0891073795
  • ISBN-13: 978-0891073796
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 12.7 x 19.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 113 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #430,841 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By David Marshall on May 22 2004
Format: Paperback
As a grad student in China studies, I once made the mistake of referring to Marx and Satan in the footnote of a paper for a very by-the-book scholar. He circled the title in heavy red ink and wrote in the margin with even heavier sarcasm: "Might the book have a bias?"
Richard Wurmbrand certainly did have a bias, though not the one the "one star" reviewers below accuse him of. No, this is not "anti-Semitic drivel;" Wurmbrand was himself a Jew, persecuted by the fascists for his race, who loved his people. No, he is not a "reactionary fanatic," nor does this book represent "the scarier mindscapes of the Bible Belt." Wurmbrand is actually from Romania, which is I believe some distance from Texas, and you read his many fascinating books, you will find he was actually quite thoughtful. But yes, he was biased against communism. He spent many years in slave labor camps, was tortured, and saw friends die. (A slave labor camp, I might point out, is rather a scarier place than a Southern Baptist church; tens of millions of people died in such places in the last century.)
Despite the provocative title of this book, such experiences did not render Wurmbrand bitter or unhinged. His argument here is not a vitriolic piece of ad hominem; rather it is a serious suggestion, backed up, it seems, by a fair amount of circumstantial evidence.
It is commonly argued that Marx had nothing to do with the crimes of communism. Even if Wurmbrand's central thesis does not convince you, the evidence he offers does at least show the spiritual or psychological continuity between Marx and the crimes committed in his name.
The book has its flaws, true. The evidence Wurmbrand offers is not overpowering.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By "beggarbooks" on May 7 2002
Format: Paperback
If you have ever been curious about Karl Marx's background then by all means read this indisputably original book!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on April 20 2004
Format: Paperback
This book dives right into something that is ignored by even most critics of Marx - his satanic roots.
Marx, like Engels, both were involved in satanic teachings of "the communist rabbi" Moses Hess. He wrote a number of satanic poems. In fact, his doctoral thesis was entitled "I hate all the gods." Marx was delving into satanism long before he knew anything about economics. He had no knowledge of the plight of the working man or "proletariat" at that time.
One of the critics of this book says that it is just anti-semetic and rediculous. Interestingly, if you look at that same critic's other reviews, his other reviews are for the band T.S.O.L which is an L.A. "death rock" band which he favorably compares to early Christian Death. His other reviews are for the band "Death Church" (which he likes) and "Jesuseater."
It's pretty hard to take a guy like that serious in a review of a book about satanism and Marx.
Anyway, this book sheds quite a bit of light on the topic of Marx's turn to satanism during his school years. Marx's poetry about desiring to destroy the world and take the place of the creator is downright haunting.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By zonaras on Dec 26 2003
Format: Paperback
"The good of the workers was only a pretense. Where proletarians do not fight for Socialist ideals, Marxists will exploit racial differences or the so-called generation gap. The main thing is, religion must be destroyed."
_Marx and Satan_ by Richard Wurmbrand is a small book that advances the theory that Karl Marx was a member of a Satanic cult. To this affect, Wurmbrand, a Lutheran pastor who had been imprisoned by Communist authorities in Romania, cites many examples of Marx's poetry and personal writings. He also delves into the backgrounds of other members of the early communist/socialist movements, notably Frederick Engels and Moses Hess. Marx was born a Jew, however he was baptized at age seven for his family's business reasons. It appears that Marx may have been devout in his early years, but he later turned against Christianity with a vengeance. Marx's poetry contains references to overthrowing God and having himself [Marx] reign in His stead. Despite his current reputation in liberal academia as a champion of the rights of the poor, Marx made many disparaging comments about the poor and unenlightened. Despite his pretenses as being a champion of the exploited classes, the poor have generally in history been the ones least likely to change their "primitive" worldview in the face of drastic social change. Most of those committed to Communist/Marxist ideology in America are those from well-educated, upwardly mobile types who think they are "enlightened" about humanity's true condition. Marx called the Slavs and Russians of Eastern Europe scum and reactionary people. Curiously, he polemicizes against his own people the Jews, characterizing them as supporters of tyrants and as capitalist exploiters.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.


Feedback