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Maus I: A Survivor's Tale: My Father Bleeds History Paperback – Aug 12 1986


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Pantheon (Aug. 12 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0394747232
  • ISBN-13: 978-0394747231
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 16.6 x 1.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 318 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (104 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #27,699 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
I went out to see my Father in Rego Park. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Silver on June 23 2008
Format: Paperback
Maus I & II represent a fascinating account of the Holocaust from the perspective of one survivor and his son. The idea of using different animals to represent different types of people ends up creating a very human story - even more so when the author doesn't shy away from revealing the moral weaknesses of his own protagonists (including himself).

The two previous reviews criticising the portrayal of Poles as pigs miss the point entirely. In fact, the Poles are not portrayed uniformly. Some good, some bad - but in any case, as they were remembered by the main protagonist, free of any attempts at being "nice" or diplomatic. (After all, a politically correct zealot could also object to the image of Jews as mice.)

Since Maus came out in the early 90's, other artists have created stories using the same idea of animals representing character types - such as Canales' and Guarnidos' "Blacksad" series - with a much greater range of artistic expression and abilities. But Maus remains an original, and as far as an account of one of the most monumental and dark historical events in history, it is entirely unique.
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By RIP on June 25 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For a recounting of the Holocaust of WWII from a survivors experiences was a phenomenal tale of survival and hope for the future. The triumph of the human spirit under such horrific conditions and suffering was a very poignant part of the story from my point of view and gives a true glimpse into human nature and what humanity is at its truest nature when put in such trying and in essence horrific conditions. You see the best and the worst of all people based on their on quest for survival and potential morality but that is never truly explored in the story.

I do have to admit, and maybe I read too much into this, but their is a racist over tone in the artwork of Spiegelman in the types of animals used to represent the varying races/people in the tale. Jews were mice, Germans and Pollacks as pigs, and the French as frogs. Like I said I may be reading more into it than is really there, nonetheless I say anyone who is a lover of literature or fantastic comics should buy this book.
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Format: Paperback
The story starts with how the main charecter and his wife met and follows how they survived WWII. The story is told thru a father to his son. The son is the man who wrote the book. This makes it a combination Biography and historical drama. What makes it more powerful is the fact that the story is true.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Newbia on June 14 2004
Format: Paperback
I'm Jewish and easily depressed, so I expected to be very moved by this tale. But I wasn't. I was freaked out-Art portrays Jewish life well and I was honestly scared for the characters-but not moved. I did not cry. Then again, I'd probably give it four stars if it weren't for my high expectations. I'm definitely definitely going to buy the next installment though.
I disagree with people who say Polish people are portrayed negatively in this book, aside from the fact that he portrays them as pigs. Most of the Poles in this book were nice-they hide in the house of a Polish lady, there housekeeper is Polish. Of course, at one point you have Polish people being anti-semitic but what do you expect? No Poles actually hurt the Spiegelman's, though they do occaisonally put them in jeopardy by yelling that there is a Jew in the yard. I think the animals are meant to portray stereotypes. Vladek has disdain for the Poles, and Art shows that by making them pigs. That doesn't mean that the Poles are bad, that's just how Vladek is.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ty Peters on May 25 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is one that caught me in its clutches instantly! For those who are interested in the Holocaust and are sick of stories of Anne Frank(no offense), this is perfect! Summary: The author of this book, Art Speigelman, goes to visit his father, Vladek, and learn of his story of living in Hitler's Europe. Art also tries to understand his father's changes that have happened due to his experiences. Art's stepmother, Mala, complains that Vladek is too uptight and doesn't care about her. Vladek complains that all Mala cares about is his money. Art's struggles show how even the children of the survivors have to survive. Review: This book took me away. For a story of the Holocaust, this hits a home run. Never before have I read a book like this. A tale like this deserves to be read by everyone.
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Format: Paperback
MAUS surprised me. Before I read it, I expected I might admire and respect it as an important comic, but I figured the subject matter was altogether too heavy and serious to permit it to be in the least bit enjoyable.
Boy, was I was wrong. MAUS is not only a an amazing use of the comic idiom-an affecting chronicle of what is surely THE most uncomical event in the 20th Century-it is also a gripping and psychologically astute portrait of a family tottering on the sizable wake of that event.
Art Spiegelman has managed to create something equally important and entertaining with MAUS. If you've been scared away by the heaviness of the subject matter, don't let yourself be. It's heavy, for sure, but it's also a great bit of storytelling.
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By mik green on March 10 2004
Format: Paperback
I recently read the book entitled Maus: A survivors tale; 1 My father bleeds history. It was a really good book. I especially liked how it was it was written like a comic book, so it was really easy to read and entertaining at the same time. My favorite part was when Artie's father, Vladek would stand up for himself, I liked it because it gave me a really good feeling inside myself, that sort of inspired me to do something constructive or that would help someone. In conclusion if I were you and had not read this book I would definitely go to my local library or neigh/borhood bookstore and borrow/buy this book because it is totally worth your time and money. So basically I am telling you to make sure you read this book!
Mik Green
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