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Medulla


Price: CDN$ 19.20 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
11 new from CDN$ 11.45 11 used from CDN$ 0.22

Frequently Bought Together

Medulla + Vespertine (Vinyl) + Post
Price For All Three: CDN$ 69.51

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  • In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • Vespertine (Vinyl) CDN$ 41.14

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    FREE Shipping. Details

  • Post CDN$ 9.17

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Aug. 31 2004)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Elektra Entertain.
  • ASIN: B0002JUXB0
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #15,785 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Pleasure Is All Mine
2. Show Me Forgiveness
3. Where Is The Line
4. Vokuro
5. Oll Birtan
6. Who Is It
7. Submarine
8. Desired Constellation
9. Oceania
10. Sonnets / Unrealities XI
11. Ancestors
12. Mouths Cradle
13. Mivikudags
14. Triumph Of A Heart


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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

By gene on Nov. 12 2013
Format: LP Record Verified Purchase
Thank you very much for the prompt service and doing business you. The sleeve of vinyl is perfect. And i presume that the vinyl is also perfect. I have not opened for it is a gift.
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Format: Audio CD
Having known Björk's music for a while, it is easy for me to understand where Medúlla's perspective comes from. Her endless need to reinvent herself, spinning world after world out of each project's sonic ashes, makes sense to the listener that hears the intimacy in songs like 'Pagan Poetry' and 'Jóga,' or the raw intensity in 'Hidden Place' and 'All Is Full of Love.' To the casual ear, though, this latest album may sound more like a series of a capella experiments, warmups, and even alarming mistakes. It is a fascinating listen, but an alienating one for the uninitiated.
Her spectacular first single, the Athens Olympics debuted siren call 'Oceania,' may have impressed many and confounded a great many others (Poor Katie Couric!), but her decision not to release it commercially is telling of her idiosyncratic view of music in general. Songs like 'Triumph of a Heart' and 'Mouth's Cradle' are both instantly recognisable as patent Björk magic and incredible sonic journeys, but digressions like 'Ancestors' and 'Miðvikudags' (Icelandic for Wednesdays) may confuse or even frighten. Her interest in paganistic, primal grunts and whistles is compelling to hear about, but disarming to listen to. That, in general, is the sense one will be left with after listening to most of these songs, sadly. But there are a number of worthy gems to be found, 'The Pleasure Is All Mine' and the e e cummings-based 'Sonnets/Unrealities XI' being remarkable examples.
Björk is a leader in her field and a master of innovation. But Medúlla is a departure many fans will have a difficult time following along with.
Look for the second single, 'Who Is It,' to come out on October 25.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Sept. 13 2004
Format: Audio CD
Granted this is not a C.D. that you can turn on at your next cocktail party or throw in your walkman during your morning run. If you want that, listen to something else. As for all the long time Bjork fans who want another Homogenic you are not going to get it. Shes been there and done that. Any worth while musician, artist or even actress for that matter must progress and inspiration is not a static phenomena.
Medulla is an amazing album, one to be listened to with giant headphones at 2 in the morning with some sort of snack food in hand. This album is tribal yet cosmopolitan, somber yet ecstatic, avant-garde yet organic, beautiful and rough. The Inuit influence is glaring and perhaps those unfamiliar with the art form will be very perplexed but why not expose yourself to a new experience, you can only be the better for it.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Sept. 2 2004
Format: Audio CD
On Medulla, Bjork has included some of her best and some of her worst work to date. While the majority of these songs are magnificent [particularly Mouth's Cradle, Oceania, and Who Is It] there are two tracks in particular that I wish I could delete. Both Submarine [which sounds like it is being performed by a deranged barber shop quartet] and Ancestors are examples of eccentric nonsense... absolutely horrible!
That said, despite the lack of "instruments" the album has a definite pop sensibility that is reminiscent of Homogenic and to a lesser extent Post, and is a world away from the dainty sound of Vespertine. Also unlike Vespertine is that there are easily indentifiable singles on this album. The Pleasure Is All Mine, Where Is The Line, Who Is It, Oceania, Mouth's Cradle, and Triumph Of A Heart could all potentially climb the charts the same way songs like Hyperballad, I Miss You, and Bachelorette managed to in the late 90's.
Like all of Bjork's albums, Medulla is initially challenging but quickly becomes familiar as your ears grow accustomed to the wild key changes and its whimsical movements. Its sound is electronic but primal at the same time... a blend of ancient and modern.
For those of us who were let down by Vespertine, Medulla harkens back to when Bjork wrote catchy, melodic pop music. It is not as full-on in your face as Homogenic [5 stars] or Post [4 stars], but Medulla still manages to charm.
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on March 29 2007
Format: Audio CD
Ever heard of mouth music? It's a traditional technique for producing music with nothing except rhythmic vocals -- literally, just music from the mouth. Quirky Icelandic Bjork isn't a Celt, but she takes the term "mouth music" to new heights in the enchantingly challenging "Medulla," an album whose music is based on the voice.

Bjork embarks on her strangest and most experimental musical journey here. Not just one kind of song, but many -- majestic medieval-flavored music to pop to hymns to an eerie vocal ballad backed by throat singing. Bjork even beatboxes with a choir behind her, giving a sort of classical hip-hop sound to the music. Can't get that just anywhere.

"Medulla" isn't entirely devoid of instrumentation... the non-vocal variety, that is. There's a pretty piano solo to "Ancestors," and the deep bassline of "Submarine." Keyboards pop up occasionally But those are the exception -- most of the time it's Bjork's soft vocals, singing, grunting, whistles, and various gutteral sounds -- sort of a dolphin-on-acid noise. It's wonderfully weird.

After the pretty but vaguely monotonous "Vespertine," Bjork just bursts out with her new sound. What's strangest is the effect it has when one is listening to it -- it's powerful and visceral, lulling you one moment and making you shiver the next. At times it's unnerving -- the grunts range from sexy to ghastly, and are enough to make you squirm -- but it never fails to provoke a response.

"Medulla" isn't a full departure from her past material. The opening number has echoes of "Vespertine," while "Where is the Line" hints at "Homogenic." But the heart and soul of "Medulla" rests in an entirely new zone, far away from the icy grandeur of her past trip-hop.
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